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616 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Design Thinking, Leadership, and the Grammar of Schooling: Implications for Educational Change

Available from: University of Chicago Press

Publication: American Journal of Education, vol. 126, no. 4

Pages: 499-518

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Abstract/Notes: A growing number of schools across the globe have implemented design thinking (DT) as an instructional approach to increase student engagement, motivate creative thinking, and teach students to problem solve. Although offering significant opportunity to students, implementing DT can involve pushing against the traditional “grammar of schooling.” Drawing on in-depth qualitative case study data, we present findings on a previously low-performing, underenrolled middle school that underwent a dramatic shift when becoming a magnet school focused on DT. We explain the intentional leadership actions that facilitated structural and cultural changes, including building a collaborative leadership structure. Interactions between the principal and the teachers led to the emergence of practices that supported innovation schoolwide. At the same time, internal and external challenges rooted in the grammar of schooling arose, requiring educators to respond to sustain the momentum for change. Implications for policy and practice are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1086/709510

ISSN: 0195-6744, 1549-6511

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Education for Sustainability at a Montessori Primary School: From Silos to Systems Thinking

Available from: Cambridge University Press

Publication: Australian Journal of Environmental Education, vol. 28, no. 2

Pages: 162-164

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Oceania, Sustainability

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Abstract/Notes: This research investigated Education for Sustainability (EfS) at an independent Montessori primary school, located in the Perth metropolitan area of Western Australia. A longitudinal case study involving analysis of data from a 20-year period was conducted to determine the effectiveness of EfS. Historical information about EfS at the school from 1990 to 2005 was examined, with the main focus of the study being on the impact of the Australian Sustainable Schools Initiative (AuSSI) between 2005 and 2009. AuSSI promotes a whole school, whole systems thinking approach to EfS.Three school-based issues in EfS were studied. First, the research aimed to determine what elements of EfS were in operation in the school prior to involvement in AuSSI. Second, student outcomes including engagement with whole systems thinking, attitudes and values, knowledge and understandings, and skills and behaviours related to EfS, were investigated during the first 5 years of participation in AuSSI. Third, teacher perceptions of the EfS program, including engagement with whole systems thinking, were examined during this same time period. A case study approach was employed to enable in-depth investigation of EfS in the life of the school prior to, during and post implementation of AuSSI. This approach facilitated revelation of participants’ lived experiences, their perceptions and understandings of EfS, as well as detailed information about student outcomes in EfS. Case study methodology was also compatible with the culture and processes of the participating school and provided an opportunity for utilising a whole systems thinking approach. Data was gathered from a range of sources, through surveys, interviews, observation and document analysis over a 5-year period. The total participants included 11 teachers and 75 students. The research identified particular antecedents of EfS in the Montessori method of education that existed in the school prior to AuSSI, including the whole child approach, together with the Montessori learning environment, curriculum and values. Following participation in AuSSI, student attitudes and values, knowledge and understandings, and skills and behaviours related to EfS were enhanced for all year levels. However, after 3 years, when specific EfS actions and projects ceased, student EfS outcomes were limited. Furthermore, students’ thinking and behaviour indicated a ‘silo’, rather than whole systems thinking approach to EfS. Teachers perceived the EfS program as highly effective in the initial 3 years after joining AuSSI. Key elements that enhanced EfS included EfS staff champions who had access to EfS networks, leadership support, and active school community involvement in all EfS processes. However, after 3 years of being an AuSSI school, the culmination of reduced leadership support for EfS, lack of staff training, vague designation of staff with EfS responsibilities and inadequate community involvement, resulted in cessation of the EfS program. Teacher perceptions on whole systems thinking revealed alignment between Montessori philosophy, EfS and whole system thinking was more in theory than in practice. Through an in-depth longitudinal case study of a school this research highlighted the importance of whole school EfS professional learning, embedding EfS and whole systems thinking across the curriculum at all year levels, whole school support, and the usefulness of a sustainability continuum that recognises the complex, dynamic interplay of issues involved in a school's EfS journey. It is strongly recommended that improvements to pre-service teacher education in EfS are implemented, and a review of the AuSSI toolkit is conducted to refine EfS evaluation processes and to target the specific EfS needs of teachers at different stages of schooling, as well as to enhance understanding and implementation of the whole systems thinking approach. Finally, EfS professional learning for all school staff in all schools is warranted to enhance depth of EfS engagement.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1017/aee.2013.8

ISSN: 0814-0626, 2049-775X

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Rethinking the Uses of Concrete Materials in Learning: Perspectives from Development and Education

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Child Development Perspectives, vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 137-139

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Abstract/Notes: The idea that concrete materials benefit children’s learning has a long history in developmental psychology and education, dating back to M. Montessori (1917), J. Piaget (1970), and J. S. Bruner (1966). Too often, however, scholars use these traditional views to give concrete materials a blanket endorsement. The articles in this issue go beyond traditional views and advance our understanding of the conditions under which students do and do not benefit from using concrete materials. They suggest that some processes involved in using concrete objects are not restricted to children of a certain age but rather apply across ages. They also highlight the need for systematic investigations into the type and amount of direction students need when working with concrete materials in the classroom.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/j.1750-8606.2009.00093.x

ISSN: 1750-8606

Article

Learning Styles: Thinking vs. Feeling

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 4

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

What Terms Should We Use? The Teacher's Responsibility to Acknowledge Changes in Scientific Thinking

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 15, no. 3

Pages: 24-25

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Can Thinking Be Taught:?

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 12

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Thinking Outside the Box: Marketing Montessori in the Modern World

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 4

Pages: 48-53

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Abstract/Notes: Newton Montessori School, in Newton Centre, MA, took out ads on Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) trains as a way of marketing to commuters taking public transportation to and from work each day. Connecting and promoting real-life events on social media can increase awareness about your school and community. "[At our events], we make sure to include a drawing for a 'Montessori' prize aimed at parents-last year, we raffled off a copy of [the book] How to Raise an Amazing Child the Montessori Way and a gift certificate to [the materials company] Small Hands-it is a good way to collect email addresses from people who stop by the tent," said Kibler. [...]the most powerful marketing tool may be the simplest-word of mouth.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

How the Montessori Method Relates to "Left- and Right-Brain Thinking."

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 9, no. 4

Pages: 15–17

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Thinking in New Ways about Teaching Practice

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 10, no. 2

Pages: 7

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Abstract/Notes: Teachers Research Network

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

What Do You See That Makes You Say That? Visual Thinking in Montessori Environments

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

Publication: Montessori International, no. 99

Pages: 20-21

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

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