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631 results

Conference Paper

Freeing the child's response-ability: Celebrating the natural genius of children

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Language: English

Published: Boston, Massachusetts: AMI-USA, 2000

Pages: 64-67

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Effects of Three Different Educational Approaches on Children's Drawing Ability: Steiner, Montessori, and Traditional

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: British Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 70, no. 4

Pages: 485-503

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Abstract/Notes: Although there is a national curriculum for art education in the UK there are also alternative approaches in the private sector. This paper addresses the issue of the effect of these approaches on children's drawing ability. Aim. To compare the drawing ability in three drawing tasks of children in Steiner, Montessori and traditional schools. Sample. The participants were 60 school children between the ages of 5;11 and 7;2. Twenty children were tested in each type of school. Method. Each child completed three drawings: a free drawing, a scene and an observational drawing. Results. As predicted, the free and scene drawings of children in the Steiner school were rated more highly than those of children in Montessori and traditional schools. Steiner children's use of colour was also rated more highly, although they did not use more colours than the other children. Steiner children used significantly more fantasy topics in their free drawings. Further observation indicated that the Steiner children were better at using the whole page and organising their drawings into a scene; their drawings were also more detailed. Contrary to previous research Montessori children did not draw more inanimate objects and geometrical shapes or fewer people than other children. Also, contrary to the prediction, Steiner children were significantly better rather than worse than other children at observational drawing. Conclusion. The results suggest that the approach to art education in Steiner schools is conducive not only to more highly rated imaginative drawings in terms of general drawing ability and use of colour but also to more accurate and detailed observational drawings.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1348/000709900158263

ISSN: 2044-8279, 0007-0998

Report

The Evaluation and Implications of Research with Young Handicapped and Low-Income Children at the Institute for Research on Exceptional Children at the University of Illinois

Available from: ERIC

Americas, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, North America, Poor children, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This study to determine effects of preschool training of mentally retarded children from low-income families asks three major questions: 1. Does preschool training displace the rate of development of such children? 2. Does rate of growth continue at an accelerated rate, or does it return to the original rate of development during primary school years? 3. Are the results similar for children living in different environments? Five intervention programs are outlined: 1. Traditional nursery school; 2. Community Integrated program; 3. The Montessori method; 4. Karnes structured cognitive plan; and 5. The Bereiter-Englemann(B-E). As a result of the program, some children in the demonstration center no longer function in the retarded range. Behavior has improved and several have entered a public school or preschool for normal children. It is suggested that mothers of infants might accomplish more at home with guidance, since professional tutoring is not feasibly practical, and children with higher IQ need special early programming to attain their potential. (RG)

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 1973

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Children’s Preference for Real Activities: Even Stronger in the Montessori Children’s House

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 1-9

Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In the United States, children are often given the opportunity to engage in pretend activities; many believe this kind of play benefits children’s development. Recent research has shown, though, that when children ages 4 to 6 are given a choice to do the pretend or the real version of 9 different activities, they would prefer the real one. The reasons children gave for preferring real activities often concerned their appreciation of the functionality; when children did prefer pretend activities, their reasons often cited being afraid of, not allowed to, or unable to do the real activity. Given that children in Montessori classrooms have more experience performing real, functional activities, in this study we asked if this preference for real activities is even stronger among children in Montessori schools. We also asked children to explain their preferences. The data are from 116 3- to 6-year-old children (M = 59.63 months, SD = 12.08 months; 68 female): 62 not in Montessori schools and 54 in Montessori schools. Children explained their preferences for pretendand real versions of 9 different activities. Children in Montessori schools preferred real activities even more than did children in other preschools, but all children explained their choices in similar ways. The implications of these results are discussed with regard to play in preschool classrooms.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i2.7586

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Montessori Elementary Is Different: What Children Study, What Children Do

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 15, no. 2

Pages: 8-10

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori Children Grow Up: Why I Was a Montessori Child and Why My Children Are Now

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 28, no. 2

Pages: 8–10

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Setting Children up for Social Mastery: Building young Children's social Capacity - looking through a Teaching and Learning lens

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Procedia: Social and Behavioral Sciences, vol. 93

Pages: 1696-1703

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.sbspro.2013.10.102

ISSN: 1877-0428

Article

Children in Space: Building with Children in Mind: An Architectural Perspective

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 3–6

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

English with Non-English Children in a Montessori House of Children

Publication: Around the Child, vol. 14

Pages: 40-48

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Language: English

ISSN: 0571-1142

Article

Gardening with Children: Children Helping Nature

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 23

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

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