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853 results

Book

Barnehagemetodikk: plan og arbeid i barnehagen [Kindergarten methods: programs and work in kindergarten / Metodica per la scuola materna: programmi e lavoro alla scuola materna]

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Language: Norwegian

Published: Oslo, Norway: Samlaget, 1993

Edition: 3rd ed.

ISBN: 82-521-4039-4

Article

How to . . . Build and Maintain Public Montessori Programs That Are Truly Excellent: Advice from Teacher Educators

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 14, no. 3

Pages: 16-17

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Envisioning the Whole Third Plane: Montessori Erdkinder and Urban Adolescent Programs Help Each Other

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 31, no. 1

Pages: 57–67

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis

Circle Time Norms in Early Childhood Montessori Programs: A Survey of Montessori Teachers Across the United States

Available from: MINDS@UW River Falls

Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education - Teachers, North America, Rituals, Teachers, Three-hour work cycle, United States of America, Work periods

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Abstract/Notes: This study examined the nature of circle time within early childhood Montessori classrooms in the United States of America. We explored literature pertaining to the history and development of circle time as well as circle time research in preschool and kindergarten settings. Unable to find writings or research specific to Montessori circle time practices, we crafted a 30-question survey for early childhood Montessori teachers to determine basic information about their circle time approaches. The survey asked participants about demographic information, circle time logistics, circle time activities, reactions to circle time, planning and preparation, and the morning work cycle. Using social media and direct emails, we gathered over 300 responses from 50 states and the District of Columbia; a total of 276 participants completed the full survey. Results focused on five different areas: time - the frequency, duration, and scheduling of circle time; attendance - who joined circle time and for how long; teacher preparation - participants’ training and planning approaches; circle time programming - the most common and popular activities; the morning work cycle – its relation to circle time. Results revealed that 92% of survey participants have circle time every day or most days; most participants hold circle time as the last event of the morning for generally 20 minutes or less; the most common circle time events were show and tell, calendar work, vocabulary lessons, Grace and Courtesy lessons, read aloud discussions, dancing and movement, snack time, general conversation, read aloud (stories), and birthday celebrations. Most participants had a work cycle that lasts less than three hours. This study promotes reflection on the importance and meaning of circle time in Montessori classrooms in relation to its apparent absence in Dr. Montessori’s writings.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2021

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

An Evaluation of Montessori and Day Care Programs for Disadvantaged Children

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: The Journal of Educational Research, vol. 68, no. 3

Pages: 95-99

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This study compared Montessori and day care compensatory programs for disadvantaged children. Students in the treatment programs were compared to a disadvantaged control group and an advantaged middle-class control group on eight tests of cognitive skill and on a composite factor score derived from the eight tests as a single summary index. Analysis indicated that treatment differences existed on six of the nine analyses. Both preschool programs were effective in raising levels of performance beyond those of other disadvantaged Students and both approached middle class levels of performance, yet the treatment groups did not differ from each other.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/00220671.1974.10884719

ISSN: 0022-0671

Book Section

The Cognitive Effects of Pre-School Programs for Disadvantaged Children

Book Title: Revisiting Early Childhood Education

Pages: 223-240

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Language: English

Published: New York, New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1973

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Özel Eğitimde Kullanılan Alternatif Programlar (Montessori Yaklaşımı) / Alternative Programs Used in Special Education (The Montessori Approach)

Available from: DergiPark Akademik

Publication: TÜBAV Bilim Dergisi / TÜBAV Journal of Science, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 107-116

Asia, Children with disabilities, Developmentally disabled children, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Special education, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: There are a wide variety of approaches towards education and treatment that have been used in the education of individuals with special needs. One of these approaches is the Montessori Method. The Montessori Method emphasizes that education is a natural process and believes that the child behaves by listening to his or her own inner voice and in this way develops self control and learning. Mentally disabled and autistic children and other children with developmental disorders exist in the same environment with their able peers in special education schools which practice the Montessori Method. Furthermore, the Montessori Method provides the child to find the best and the easiest way of learning through practicing by himself. In the present study, the topics of equipment, arrangement of the educational environment, education and teaching methods, the role of the teacher in education in the Montessori Method and the use of the method in disabled children will be discussed. / Özel gereksinimli bireylerin eğitiminde çok çeşitli eğitim ve öğretim yaklaşımı vardır bunlardan birisi de Montessori yöntemidir. Montessori yöntemi, eğitimin doğal bir süreç olduğunu vurgular ve çocuğun kendi iç sesini dinleyerek hareket edeceğine, böylece hem kendi kendini denetlemeyi hem de öğrenmeyi gerçekleştireceğine inanır. Montessori yöntemini uygulayan özel eğitim okullarında, zihinsel engelli, otistik özellikleri olan çocuklar ve diğer gelişimsel bozuklukları olan çocuklar engelli olmayan akranları ile birlikte aynı ortamda bulunurlar. Ayrıca Montessori yöntemi, çocuğa kendi kendine uygulayarak en iyi ve en kolay şekilde öğrenme yolunu bulmasını sağlar. Bu çalışmada, Montessori yönteminde; araç gereç, eğitim ortamının düzenlenmesi, eğitim öğretim yöntemleri, öğretmenin eğitimdeki rolü ve yönteminin engelli çocuklarda kullanımı konularına yer verilmiştir.

Language: Turkish

ISSN: 1308-4933

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Developmental Appropriateness of High-Quality Montessori Programs

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Young Children, vol. 53, no. 4

Pages: 4-16

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Language: English

ISSN: 0044-0728

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Children with Disabilities Attending Montessori Programs in the United States

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 16-32

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Abstract/Notes: Early childhood education plays a critical role in establishing positive social-emotional behaviors and promoting the development of skills needed to succeed in elementary school. Although inclusion of children with disabilities (CWD) in early childhood classrooms is increasing throughout the world, numerous social, logistical, and political factors continue to present challenges to full inclusion. The Montessori educational approach, established at the beginning of the 20th century and now applied widely throughout Europe and the United States, may present a highly suitable learning context for CWD, particularly given its historical basis in efforts to meet the needs of underprivileged and cognitively delayed children. On a theoretical level, the inclusion of CWD should be an accepted practice for Montessori programs yet reports of the number and characteristics of CWD attending Montessori programs are scarce. This paper reports upon the findings of a survey of U.S. Montessori early childhood programs’ current enrollment of CWD. The survey indicated that CWD represent 3.75% of the infant and toddler (0–3 years) population and 8.49% of the preschool/early childhood (3–6 years) population at responding institutions. Additionally, although school directors indicate that their teachers generally feel confident and competent including CWD in their classrooms, they expressed a need for ongoing professional development and additional support from special education experts to further empower the inclusion of CWD in all aspects of Montessori education.

Language: English

ISSN: 2378-3923

Book

Preschool Directory: Preschools, Montessori Schools, Park District Programs, Day Care Centers

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Language: English

Published: Arlington Heights, Illinois: American Association of University Women, 1983

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