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518 results

Article

England's First Children's House [East Runton]

Publication: Montessori Quarterly, vol. 29/30

Pages: 3–4

England, Europe, Great Britain, Montessori method of education - History, Northern Europe, United Kingdom

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Language: English

Book Section

Children's Well-Being and Teachers' Benevolence as the Road to Higher Performance?: Cognitive Neuroscience and Montessori in Preschools

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Book Title: Education, Parenting, and Mental Health Care in Europe: The Contradictions of Building Autonomous Individuals

Pages: 63-78

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Abstract/Notes: There is now a broad international consensus that investing in early childhood education and care represents the highest “return on investment” in terms of economic and social development. The pursuit of the dual objective of efficiency and equity has resulted in a reorientation of preschool curricula towards preparation for compulsory schooling, emphasizing the acquisition of the “fundamentals” (reading, writing, and arithmetic) most useful for future academic success. The chapter offers first a comparative analysis of how this “schooling process” unfolded in French and Belgian nursery schools and in the Danish kindergarten. It attests to the persistence of specific cultural and political traditions relating to both the respective roles of the state and families in early childhood education, as well as of conceptions of childhood and relations between adults and children. Second, based on field research conducted in French-speaking Belgium, it discusses the idea that the search for children's well-being and performance at the same time creates tensions in the exercise of the teaching profession. It then shows that it is possible to understand the success of the discourse of cognitive neuroscience and so-called alternative pedagogical methods, including Montessori, because these discourses seem to propose a way to overcome these tensions.

Language: English

Published: New York, New York: Routledge, 2024

ISBN: 978-1-00-337720-7

Article

Protecting Young Children in Time of War

Publication: Infants and Toddlers, vol. 7, no. 1

Pages: 13–14

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Abstract/Notes: Includes introductory Letter to the Editor

Language: English

Article

Seeing the Classroom from the New Children's Point of View

Publication: Point of Interest, vol. 8, no. 10

Pages: 1–4

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Language: English

Article

Children's Memories Of Their Montessori Experience

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 23, no. 2

Pages: 30-33

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Abstract/Notes: This article discusses the results of a survey conducted at the Princeton Montessori School (PMS) in New Jersey, a school serving age levels from infants through middle school. The author designed a series of five to six questions about memories of activities, teachers, and friends for all current K-8 students with a minimum of 1 year of Montessori schooling and for former students for whom she had contact information. The study suggests that the Montessori approach as practiced at the PMS works. Results in areas of "memories of classroom" and "favorite works" are consistent in supporting the use of concrete materials for internalization of abstract concepts. Responses from all areas of this study at PMS provide support for Montessori educators' implementation of the principles of independence, freedom to choose, socialization, and movement in their classrooms. Students participating in the study liked food work because they could eat, move around, and share. They enjoyed and remember the concrete materials, especially the math materials because of their beauty and concrete quality. All levels enjoyed being outdoors and those in the Elementary and Middle School programs, in particular, liked having specials, not only because of the activity, but because they developed skills while having fun.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation

Knowledge and attitudes of Montessori teachers of young children as a context for guiding normalization and self-construction process

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was (1) to investigate the degree of agreement between AMI trained Montessori teachers' knowledge and attitudes and Montessori's recommendations for guiding the process of normalization among young children and (2) to discover the reasons for differences from those recommendations. Normalization is the central process in the Montessori method. Except for a study by this investigator (Zener, 1993) guiding the process of normalization had not been researched since Montessori's work some forty-five to eighty-five years ago. Therefore, this investigation also provided current teacher experiences of guiding the process of normalization. One hundred sixty five Montessori teachers attending various regional and national conferences were surveyed with knowledge and attitude scales. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10% of the participants. Mean scale scores from 4.0 to 5.0 on a five degree Likert scale and a SD less than 1.0 were projected as satisfactory levels of agreement with Montessori's recommendations. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the scales, and content analysis was used to analyze the interviews. T-tests and ANOVAS indicated that demographic variables were not significant to the results. The study concluded that AMI trained Montessori teachers reflected a satisfactory degree of agreement with the recommended knowledge and attitudes (M = 4.25, SD =.31 and M = 4.50, SD =.34 respectively). Knowledge and attitude correlated (p $<$.01). Reasons for differences among teachers' knowledge and attitudes about guiding the process included using other aspects of Montessori theory, disagreement with Montessori, difficulty in carrying out the theory in practice, misinterpretations of scale items, and misunderstandings about Montessori's recommendations for guiding the process of normalization. Implications for children, teachers, parents, school administration, and teacher education included validation of teachers for the high level of consistency in their reflections on guiding the process of normalization. Recommendations for future research included developing a more complete theoretical understanding of the process of normalization, particularly the importance of respecting children's spans of concentration.

Language: English

Published: College Park, Maryland, 1994

Article

Mediating Children's Conflicts - Peer Mediation

Publication: Montessori Australia eArticle, vol. 2018, no. 2

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Language: English

Article

Teaching Young Children to Resist Bias: What Parents Can Do

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 7–9

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Book

Montessori: Prescription for Children with Learning Disabiities

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Learning disabilities, Montessori method of education

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Language: English

Published: New York, New York: Putnam, 1978

ISBN: 0-399-11802-0

Book

The New Children: Talks with Dr. Maria Montessori

Available from: HathiTrust

Developmental psychology, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy

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Abstract/Notes: Reprinted in part from the Times Educational Supplement.

Language: English

Published: New York, New York: Frederick A. Stokes, 1920

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