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Book

The Authentic American Montessori School: A Guide to the Self-Study, Evaluation and Accreditation of American Schools Committed to Montessori Education

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Language: English

Published: New York, New York: American Montessori Society, 2002

Book

The Faxon Montessori Magnet Elementary School, 1990-1991. Summative Evaluation

Academic achievement, Americas, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Elementary school students, Faxon Montessori (Kansas City, Missouri), Language skills, Magnet schools, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Nongraded schools

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Abstract/Notes: This report documents the progress made by the Faxon Montessori Magnet School in Kansas City, Missouri, during the three years of its implementation of the Montessori philosophy. During the 1990-91 school year, the school served children from three years of age through third grade. School enrollment information was analyzed and data were obtained from classroom observation; from parent, teacher, and student questionnaires; and from achievement tests. Analysis of enrollment information revealed that: (1) enrollment was at 93 percent of capacity; (2) enrollments varied by grade level; and (3) minority students comprised 61 percent of the student population. Classroom observation indicated that students were engaged in independent learning activities and activities that enhanced motor skills. Teacher-initiated management was minimal. Results from the questionnaires indicated that program participants were satisfied with most aspects of the program. However, teachers were dissatisfied with the amount of administrative support they received. Achievement scores of kindergarten, first-grade, and second-grade students on the reading, math, and language subtests of the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills were above district and national norms. Third graders scored above district, and below national, norms on the Missouri Mastery and Achievement Tests. Thirteen data tables and seven figures are included, and an appendix presents a description of the goals and activities of the Faxon Montessori extended day program. (BC)

Language: English

Published: Kansas City, Missouri: Kansas City School District, 1991-08

Book

Understanding Assessment and Evaluation in Early Childhood Education

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Language: English

Published: New York, New York: Teachers College Press, 2005

Edition: 2nd

Report

An Evaluation of ESEA Title III Projects, Fiscal Year 1972. Interim Report

Available from: ERIC

Early childhood education

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Abstract/Notes: This report contains descriptions and progress of five projects in the District of Columbia partially or wholly funded by ESEA Title III: (1) The Columbia Road Preschool Pilot Project, a second-year experimental effort designed to serve as a model school providing an experimental setting for early childhood educational programs; (2) The Montessori Preschool Project, designed to adapt the Montessori method and to develop a model for a public school setting; (3) Continuing Education and Services for School Age Mothers, for which an interim report has not been included in this evaluation report; (4) Development of a Complete School Program for Rubella Children Beginning During the Pre-School Period, a project of the Special Education Department of the D.C. Public Schools, designed primarily to provide educational opportunities for young hearing impaired children who might also have other handicaps concomitant with maternal Rubella; and, (5) The Parent-Partners Traineeship Proposal for a Parent Education Program, designed to foster parent-pupil partnership in order to reinforce and extend the educational experiences of children. [Several pages of this document are not clearly legible, but it has been reproduced from the best available copy.] (RJ)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., May 1972

Master's Thesis (M. Ed.)

Pre-School Education in the ACT: An Evaluation and Comparison of the Traditional, the Montessori and the Weikart Approaches

Available from: University of Canberra

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Abstract/Notes: Since the 1980s, a variety of pre-school approaches has existed within the ACT Public School System. These approaches are in theory based on different educational ideologies and principles. The Field Study Project evaluates and compares three different educational models; existing classroom processes and procedures, and student achievements in a 'traditional', a modified Montessori and a Weikart pre-school currently operating in the ACT Public School System. Using selected criteria, an analysis of the three educational models, an ecological survey and student assessments were carried out to make the evaluations and comparisons. The analysis of the three educational models indicate different program orientations and instructional preferences in the different models. The ecological survey results suggest that the 'traditional', the modified Montessori and the Weikart approaches identify with the models they are based on. Nevertheless, educational trends and orientations are similar in the three programs, which are predominantly cognitively oriented. In contrast, teaching styles differ slightly. It is significant that the teacher in the 'traditional' program fulfills a more nurturing role, while her colleagues in the modified Montessori and the Weikart programs fulfill more instructional roles. The evaluation and comparison of the student assessments seems to indicate that there are no significant differences in achievement in drawing, specific cognitive tasks and in self-concept development between matched groups of learners in the three pre-schools. The findings support the notion that middle class children enrolled in approved pre-schools develop cognitive abilities regardless of the type of program they attend. The evaluation and comparison of the three existing approaches in the ACT suggests that the pre-school organisation in

Language: English

Published: Canberra, Australia, 1985

Book

The Multiage Evaluation Book

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Abstract/Notes: Multiage is an instructional design whereby students from two or more grades are blended together into a learning community that progresses with the same teacher(s) for two or more years. This book was designed to help teachers and administrators explore, implement, and evaluate their multiage program. The book is presented in four parts. The first three parts share a consistent format and include a series of checklists and charts for participating educators to complete. Part 1, "Exploring the Multiage Classroom," examines the multiage classroom, reasons for its implementation, and the kinds of instructional practices commonly associated with it. Part 2, "Implementing the Multiage Classroom," presents the steps involved in planning the instructional design associated with a multiage classroom. Part 3, "Evaluating the Multiage Classroom," provides assistance in establishing an evaluation process for the multiage instructional design, clarifying the elements to be evaluated and how

Language: English

Published: Peterborough, New Hampshire: Crystal Springs Books, 1999

ISBN: 1-884548-26-1

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

ACEs: Evidence, Gaps, Evaluation and Future Priorities

Available from: Cambridge University Press

Publication: Social Policy and Society, vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 415-424

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Abstract/Notes: There is strong evidence linking adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and poor outcomes in adulthood both in terms of mental and physical health. Gaps in both the evidence base and research priorities still exist. These include understanding how to identify and assess risk in children who have experienced ACEs, and also the development and, importantly, the evaluation of interventions. Outstanding gaps include whether there are sensitive periods during childhood, the role of resilience/protective factors, the causal relationships, biological mechanisms and relative risk of ACEs for particular negative outcomes. ACEs affect individual children differently and chronic exposure appears to increase the risk of poor outcomes in adulthood, meaning interventions should also be tailored to the individual children, families and communities. Generally, there needs to be better evaluation of interventions and dissemination of this information to ensure that their use is evidence based. More input from affected communities, clinicians, funding bodies and Government departments is required to identify research priorities and ensure gaps in the evidence base are addressed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1017/S1474746419000149

ISSN: 1474-7464, 1475-3073

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

An Evaluation of Montessori and Day Care Programs for Disadvantaged Children

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: The Journal of Educational Research, vol. 68, no. 3

Pages: 95-99

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This study compared Montessori and day care compensatory programs for disadvantaged children. Students in the treatment programs were compared to a disadvantaged control group and an advantaged middle-class control group on eight tests of cognitive skill and on a composite factor score derived from the eight tests as a single summary index. Analysis indicated that treatment differences existed on six of the nine analyses. Both preschool programs were effective in raising levels of performance beyond those of other disadvantaged Students and both approached middle class levels of performance, yet the treatment groups did not differ from each other.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/00220671.1974.10884719

ISSN: 0022-0671

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Master Gardener Classroom Garden Project: An Evaluation of the Benefits to Children

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Children's Environments, vol. 12, no. 2

Pages: 256-263

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Abstract/Notes: The Master Gardener Classroom Garden Project provides many inner-city children in the San Antonio Independent School District with an experiential way of learning about horticulture, gardening, themselves, and their relationships with their peers. To evaluate the benefits of participation in the Classroom Garden Project, data was collected on 52 second and third grade students. Qualitative interviews indicate that participation in the gardening project has had many positive effects on the school children. The children have gained pleasure from watching the products of their labor flourish, and have had the chance to increase interactions with their parents and other adults. In addition, the children have learned the anger and frustration that occur when things of value are harmed out of neglect or violence.

Language: English

ISSN: 2051-0780

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Children’s Automatic Evaluation of Self-Generated Actions is Different from Adults

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Developmental Science, vol. 24, no. 3

Pages: e13045

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Abstract/Notes: Performance monitoring (PM) is central to learning and decision making. It allows individuals to swiftly detect deviations between actions and intentions, such as response errors, and adapt behavior accordingly. Previous research showed that in adult participants, error monitoring is associated with two distinct and robust behavioral effects. First, a systematic slowing down of reaction time speed is typically observed following error commission, which is known as post-error slowing (PES). Second, response errors have been reported to be automatically evaluated as negative events in adults. However, it remains unclear whether (1) children process response errors as adults do (PES), (2) they also evaluate them as negative events, and (3) their responses vary according to the pedagogy experienced. To address these questions, we adapted a simple decision-making task previously validated in adults to measure PES as well as the affective processing of response errors. We recruited 8- to 12-year-old children enrolled in traditional (N = 56) or Montessori (N = 45) schools, and compared them to adults (N = 46) on the exact same task. Results showed that children processed correct actions as positive events, and that adults processed errors as negative events. By contrast, PES was similarly observed in all groups. Moreover, the former effect was observed in traditional schoolchildren, but not in Montessori schoolchildren. These findings suggest that unlike PES, which likely reflects an age-invariant attention orienting toward response errors, their affective processing depends on both age and pedagogy.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/desc.13045

ISSN: 1467-7687

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