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48 results

Article

Little Europeans

Publication: Montessori Courier, vol. 2, no. 3

Pages: 14–15

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Language: English

ISSN: 0959-4108

Article

Europe Time

Publication: Montessori Courier, vol. 4, no. 4

Pages: 4–6

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Language: English

ISSN: 0959-4108

Article

Montessori Head Teacher Finalist in European Awards [Rosie Pressland]

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 10, no. 3

Pages: 4

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

International Links [NAMTA Centenary Exhibit; Tibetan Children's Village; Montessori Europe Congress, 2006; Rome Centenary Congress]

Publication: Montessori International, no. 80

Pages: 52

Asia, Displaced communities, India, Refugees, South Asia, Tibet

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

The Kindergartens of Eastern Europe

Publication: Montessori Education, vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 22–23

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Language: English

ISSN: 1354-1498

Article

Montessori... 'The Most Interesting Woman in Europe': An Educational Revolution; A Social Movement

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1965-1973), vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 13-26

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Ōbei de no montessōri kyōiku / 欧米でのモンテッソーリ教育 [Montessori Education in Europe and the United States]

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku / モンテッソーリ教育 [Montessori Education], no. 8

Pages: 57-70

Asia, East Asia, Japan

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Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Article

Missions to Europe [Croatia, Romania, Lithuania]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 8, no. 4

Pages: 10

Croatia, Eastern Europe, Europe, Lithuania, Northern Europe, Public Montessori, Romania, Southern Europe

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

International Notes [Europe, Russia, China, India, New Zealand, Central/South America]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 20, no. 3

Pages: 11

Americas, Asia, Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Central America, China, East Asia, Eastern Europe, Europe, India, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori movement

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Three Approaches from Europe: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia

Available from: ECRP Website

Publication: Early Childhood Research and Practice, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 1-14

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Abstract/Notes: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia are three progressive approaches to early childhood education that appear to be growing in influence in North America and to have many points in common. This article provides a brief comparative introduction and highlights several key areas of similarity and contrast. All three approaches represent an explicit idealism and turn away from war and violence toward peace and reconstruction. They are built on coherent visions of how to improve human society by helping children realize their full potential as intelligent, creative, whole persons. In each approach, children are viewed as active authors of their own development, strongly influenced by natural, dynamic, self-righting forces within themselves, opening the way toward growth and learning. Teachers depend for their work with children on carefully prepared, aesthetically pleasing environments that serve as a pedagogical tool and provide strong messages about the curriculum and about respect for children. Partnering with parents is highly valued in all three approaches, and children are evaluated by means other than traditional tests and grades. However, there are also many areas of difference, some at the level of principle and others at the level of strategy. Underlying the three approaches are variant views of the nature of young children's needs, interests, and modes of learning that lead to contrasts in the ways that teachers interact with children in the classroom, frame and structure learning experiences for children, and follow the children through observation/documentation. The article ends with discussion of the methods that researchers apply to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

Language: English

ISSN: 1524-5039

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