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136 results

Article

A Failed Circulation: The Montessori Method and Teaching Materials in Republican China (1912-1949)

Available from: DOAJ

Publication: Revista Tempos e Espaços em Educação, vol. 11, no. 26

Pages: 77-90

Asia, China, East Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori method arrived in China at the time when Chinese scholars wanted to established Chinese version kindergartens with modern and scienti c teaching method and tools. rough translation and expert coming to China, Chinese scholars introduced Montessori thought into China. However, the study on Montessori method only stopped at the step of translating Montessori’s theory and trying to reshape the didactic materials. In spite of two short-lived success examples in the 1920s and 1930s, it was never large-scale applied in China. Except the expensive of the didactic tools, lacking spokesman and teachers were the main reason for the failure of the method.

Language: English

DOI: 10.20952/revtee.v11i26.9011

ISSN: 2358-1425

Article

The Spread of Montessori Education in Mainland China

Available from: Journal of Montessori Research and Education

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research and Education, vol. 3, no. 1

Pages: 1–8

Asia, China, East Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This paper is a historical account of the spread of Montessori education in mainland China. It surveys the general picture of early childhood education (ECE) in China and discusses the factors leading to the popularity of Montessori education in the 1990s. Although first introduced into China in the early 1900s, for reasons explained, Montessori education was unsuccessful in catching on as an education method in the early part of the 20th century. Following policy changes and growing interest in western education methods, Montessori education reemerged in the 1990s and has remained a sought-out education method since. In this paper, localization is also discussed as a prominent concern expressed in the Chinese research is ensuring Montessori education promotes and instills values consistent with Chinese society. As is shown, elements of the Montessori method are consistent with Chinese culture, creating a cooperative relationship between these two systems. Of equal importance, Montessori education emphasizes the cultivation of collective identity and societal relationships similar to Chinese culture, the slight difference between them being that Montessori also emphasized the construction of the individual as well.

Language: English

DOI: 10.16993/jmre.17

ISSN: 2002-3375

Article

Exploration of Implementation Practices of Montessori Education in Mainland China

Available from: Nature

Publication: Humanities and Social Sciences Communications, vol. 8

Pages: Article 250

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Abstract/Notes: This descriptive research work highlights the implementation practices of Montessori education in mainland China and the concerns over Montessori education’s localization in mainland China. Localization can be understood as the adaptive process Montessori education undergoes in order to fit within Chinese culture. Two hundred and ten in-service Montessori teachers and administrators in China were surveyed to discover information concerning implementation practices in the following areas: mixed-aged classrooms, whether classrooms were co-teaching, student-to-teacher ratios, and morning and afternoon work cycles. The study found that the majority of classrooms were mixed-aged, reflecting high-fidelity Montessori practices. However, it also found that classrooms are co-teaching, have lower student–teacher ratios, and shortened work cycles, reflecting a departure from high-fidelity Montessori implementation. While localization should be considered to safeguard Montessori education’s sustainability, Chinese Montessori educators should also reflect on these findings as high implementation fidelity has been linked to better student outcomes.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1057/s41599-021-00934-3

ISSN: 2662-9992

Article

Early Childhood Curriculum Reform in China

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Chinese Educaton and Society, vol. 44, no. 6

Pages: 5-23

Asia, China, East Asia, Educational change

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Abstract/Notes: Two waves of reform have been conducted in China since the 1980s to transform its early childhood curriculum into a Western-style, progressive model. Western curricula and programs such as the Montessori method, the project approach, the Reggio Emilia method, and the high/scope method have been imported and adopted all over the country. But the top-down reforms and these “imported” ideas have been challenged by scholars and practitioners. Aiming to understand how practices in kindergartens measure up with the reform objectives, the present study investigated the teachers’ beliefs and practices in five Shenzhen kindergartens’ literacy instruction. Altogether, ten early childhood classrooms were observed for one school week, and the ten classroom teachers were interviewed about the observed Chinese teaching practices. The teachers and teaching assistants of the ten classes (N = 20) were also surveyed about their teaching beliefs and practices. The results indicated a remarkable belief-practice gap as well as a policy-practice gap. Most of the curriculum reform ideas were expressed by the teachers in their self-reported beliefs but had not been implemented in their teaching practice. The traditional Chinese model with the teacher directing the whole-class session was still dominating. Slight differences were also found among the ten classes, which reflect the cascading effects of curriculum reform. These findings suggest that curriculum reforms should take into consideration the culture, language, teachers, parents, resources available, and the prevailing education system.

Language: English

DOI: 10.2753/CED1061-1932440601

ISSN: 1061-1932, 1944-7119

Article

Teacher Professional Learning Whilst in Quarantine: A Case Study from China

Available from: International Academic Forum (IAFOR)

Publication: IAFOR Journal of Education, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 127-144

Asia, China, East Asia, Montessori method of education - Teacher training, Teacher training

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Abstract/Notes: Transforming two early education centres in China to incorporate the educational philosophy of Maria Montessori is a huge task. To induct teaching staff into Montessori’s philosophy, pedagogy, and curriculum when their past educational experiences have been formed by a rigid, traditional model added to the challenge. To further complicate matters the transformation took place during lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the staff participated in a completely voluntary capacity whilst in isolation. For this research project the authors collected data through direct observations, surveys, questionnaires, individual teacher interviews, and focus group interviews. How online professional learning for 35 staff members was planned, organised, modified, and undertaken is outlined. Practical and technical issues involved in moving from face-to-face to online teaching are also included. Teachers reported that the professional learning program had prepared them well for when the centres reopened and the children returned.

Language: English

DOI: 10.22492/ije.9.2.08

ISSN: 2187-0594

Article

Montessori in China

Publication: Montessori Matters

Pages: 12–14

Asia, China, East Asia, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Zhongguo meng tai suo li zhuanjia xiehui / 中国蒙台梭利专家协会 [China Montessori Experts Association]

Publication: Jiao yu fa zhan yan jiu / 敎育發展硏究 [Research in Educational Development], vol. 2015, no. 6

Pages: 86

Asia, China, East Asia

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Abstract/Notes: <正>中国蒙台梭利专家协会(CHINA MONTESSORI EXPERTS ASSOCIATION)简称

Language: Chinese

ISSN: 1008-3855

Article

Mrs. Howard Gould Sails for China

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: Oakland Tribune (Oakland, California)

Pages: 18

Ah Ying - Biographic sources, Asia, China, East Asia, Katherine Clemmons Gould - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education, Wong Sun Yue Clemens - Biographic sources

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Abstract/Notes: "Mrs. Howard Gould, wife of the multi-millionaire railroad magnate, left for China today aboard the Nippon Maru to aid in introducing the Montessori educational methods there and to urge agricultural training for the youth of the land. She is accompanied on the voyage by Ah Yoke, a 7-year-old Chinese girl, who has received considerable musical instruction under the guidance of Mrs. Gould's sister, Mrs. Wong Sun Yue of this city. The child will be placed in a school at Peking, where she will pursue her studies. Early Next year Mrs. Gould and little Ah Yoke will be joined by Mrs. Wong, who now is receiving special instruction from Mme. Montessori to introduce the latter's system of child training in the Orient."

Language: English

Article

Mrs. Howard Gould Sails for China

Available from: California Digital Newspaper Collection

Publication: Los Angeles Herald (Los Angeles, California)

Pages: 1

Americas, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "After a brief stay in this city, Mrs. Howard Gould, wife of the multi-millionaire railroad magnate, left for China today aboard the Nippon Maru to aid in introducing the Montessori educational methods In the infant republic and to urge agricultural training for the youth of the land."

Language: English

Article

Tzong-Ze-Dong (House of Mercy) Chusan Island, Chekiang Province, China

Publication: The Montessori Magazine: A Quarterly Journal for Teachers, Parents and Social Workers (India), vol. 1, no. 4

Pages: 33-35

Asia, China, East Asia

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Language: English

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