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526 results

Master's Thesis

Mixed-Age Grouping in Kindergarten: A Best Case Example of Developmentally Appropriate Practice or Horace Mann's Worst Nightmare?.

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This practicum study examined kindergarten teachers' perspectives regarding mixed-age groupings that included kindergarten students. The study focused on pedagogical reasons for using mixed-age grouping, ingredients necessary for successful implementation of a multiage program that includes kindergartners, and the perceived effects of a multiage program on kindergartners. Participating were 48 public and private school kindergarten teachers from Ohio and Kentucky who taught in multiage settings. Questionnaire results indicated that teachers believed schools implemented multiage programs because they viewed them as benefiting children; encouraging appropriate, student-centered, practices; reducing pressures for competition; developing peer learning; facilitating flexible student pacing; and promoting a family-like climate. Necessary components for successful implementation of mixed-age grouping included developmental curricula, pre-implementation discussions, parental knowledge and

Language: English

Published: Canton, Ohio, 1997

Report

Ungraded Primary Programs: Steps toward Developmentally Appropriate Instruction

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This volume presents case studies of 10 ungraded primary programs. Also discussed are the obstacles, accomplishments, advantages, and disadvantages of ungraded primary programs experienced by the faculties of these schools; their recommendations for future implementation; and the literature on multi-age grouping and ungraded primary programs. Case studies were used to: (1) illustrate concepts, procedures, and materials being used by schools that had initiated ungraded primary programs; (2) provide contact information for these schools so that other educators could call on them for assistance; and (3) assess commonalities in effective ungraded primary programs. Each case study of an ungraded primary program describes the philosophy and goals, and program background and implementation. Each program's practices regarding grouping and organization, curriculum and instruction, student assessment, and remediation and enrichment, are described. In addition, the teacher's role, the

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., Apr 1991

Article

Montessori: The Original D.A.P.? [Developmentally Appropriate Practice]

Publication: PNMA Newsletter

Pages: 4

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Abstract/Notes: Presentation at Washington Association for the Education of Young Children. Newsletter of the Pacific Northwest Montessori Association (Kirkland, Washington).

Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Comparison of Montessori and Non-Montessori Teachers' Beliefs About Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Preschools

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: In this study, 173 preschool teachers (80 non-Montessori teachers and 93 Montessori teachers) were given a survey at two early childhood professional conferences that examined their beliefs about Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP). The purpose of this study was to (a) investigate preschool teachers' beliefs about Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) and Developmentally Inappropriate Practice (DIP); (b) discover the similarities and differences in the factor structures of the Teacher's Beliefs Scale (TBS) between the study conducted by Charlesworth, Hart, Burts, Thomasson, Mosley, and Fleege in 1993 and the current study about DAP; (c) discover the similarities and differences of Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) and Developmentally Inappropriate Practice (DIP) beliefs between Montessori teachers and preschool teachers; and (d) investigate the factors that are related to teachers' beliefs about DAP and DIP. The Teacher Beliefs Scale (TBS) was used to assess preschool teachers' beliefs about DAP and DIP. Factor analysis was used to support the validity of TBS in the current study. Multiple t-tests were used to identify the differences in developmental appropriate/inappropriate beliefs between Montessori and non-Montessori teachers. Multiple regression analyses were used to explain the relationship between variables of 173 Montessori and non-Montessori preschool teachers. Results of the study showed that a majority of preschool teachers agreed with 22 Developmentally Appropriate Practices (DAP) and 12 Developmentally Inappropriate Practices (DIP). Responses to seven items were different from the original study (Charlesworth et al., 1993). There was a significant difference on Inappropriate Activities and on Appropriate Child Choice between non-Montessori and Montessori teachers. There was a relationship between teachers' beliefs about DAP and teachers' educational backgrounds, teaching experiences, ethics, and DAP understanding level in the current study.

Language: English

Published: Greeley, Colorado, 2003

Article

Early Childhood Education: A Historical Defense of DAP [Developmentally Approrpiate Practice]

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 4

Pages: 56

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Abstract/Notes: A BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY OF DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE PRACTICE By David Elkind Redleaf Press Paperback, $29.95 This new book, by Early Childhood expert David Elkind, trains its lens on 11 "Giants in the Nursery"-historical figures who played a major role in the evolution of developmentally appropriate practice (DAP).In the Prehistory chapter, there are oversimplifications and unclear writing: "Although the humanistic leaders of society tried to use the printing press to their own advantage, it could not put back in the bottle the cultural genie the printing press had released" (p. 15).The organizing theme of DAP is good, although some of Elkind's statements about it seem puzzling to me, such as "DAP provides the most integrated curricula of socialization, individualization, work, and play than does any other approach to education" (p. 5).

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Developmentally Appropriate: Do the NAEYC Standards Underestimate the Abilities of Young Children?

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 5, no. 3

Pages: 12

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Making Sense of Multiage: Socio-Emotional Benefits and Instructional Strategies Developmentally Appropriate Practice

Publication: Journal of Early Education and Family Review, vol. 10, no. 1

Pages: 6-14

Nongraded schools

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Abstract/Notes: Examines the social and emotional benefits for children in early childhood multiage classrooms and the strategies teachers implement to promote those developmental domains. Explores findings about the social and emotional advantages for students, and presents advantages and disadvantages from the multiage perspective. Reviews findings on instructional strategies and implications for teaching and research. (SD)

Language: English

ISSN: 1084-6603

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Developmentally Appropriate Education for 4-Year-Olds

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Theory into Practice, vol. 28, no. 1

Pages: 47-52

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Abstract/Notes: This article elaborates on three principles which are the foundation of the developmental approach to early childhood education. These principles are multiage grouping, nongraded curricular materials, and interactive teaching. (IAH)

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/00405848909543378

ISSN: 0040-5841, 1543-0421

Article

A Study on Disabled Children's Psycho-Social Rehabilitation in Montessori Education / Montessori 교육에 있어서 장애아 심리 · 사회적 재활에 관한 고찰

Available from: RISS

Publication: 재활심리연구 / The Korean Journal of Rehabilitation Psychology, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 123-141

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Abstract/Notes: This study deals with the psycho-social rehabilitation in Montessori education system which centered on Montessori s theoretical background principles and model of psycho-social rehabilitation in Montessori method. The psycho-social rehabilitation principles in Montessori education method focused on the normalization theory, self-correctional education, the theory of individualized education, activities of daily living and occupational training. The basic reality of these enable social integration of disabled children. The Montessori Education is a practical educational method. This is applicable to both disabled and normal children alike, and suggests integrated education models for handicapped children. Montessori s methods are applied to all field of the children with physical or mental problems and emphasize social behavior with help and cooperation, personal growth, social maturity, independence and responsibility.

Language: Korean

ISSN: 1738-5563

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Low-Level Functional Deficits in Learning-Disabled Children

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Academic Therapy, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 231-234

Children with disabilities, Learning disabilities

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/105345127200800210

ISSN: 0001-396X

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