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807 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Improving Outcomes for Refugee Children: A Case Study on the Impact of Montessori Education Along the Thai-Burma Border

Available from: IEJ Online

Publication: International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives, vol. 14, no. 3

Pages: 138-149

Asia, Burma, Displaced communities, Myanmar, Refugees, Southeast Asia, Thailand

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Abstract/Notes: There are 25 million displaced children worldwide, and those receiving schooling are often educated in overcrowded classrooms. Montessori is a child-centred educational method that provides an alternative model to traditional educational approaches. In this model, students are able to direct their own learning and develop at their own pace, working with materials rather than in supervised groups or with direct teacher instruction. Because most children are working alone, teachers have more time to work one-on- one with children even when student-teacher ratios are quite large. This gives teachers increased opportunity to tailor their teaching to the specific needs and strengths of each student. We conducted an evaluation of Montessori classroom conversion for displaced students on the Thai-Myanmar border. We administered the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) to 66 children before and after classroom conversion and across treatment and control classroom conditions. We then conducted difference in difference testing. All domains showed meaningful improvements in ASQ scores, with the Montessori students gaining 18 points relative to the traditional students (p = 0.33). However, only the personal-social domain of the ASQ was statistically significant (8.8 point gain for the Montessori students relative to the control, p < 0.05) in our underpowered sample.

Language: English

ISSN: 1443-1475, 2202-493X

Article

Computer-Based Education in the Montessori Classroom: A Compatible Mixture?

Publication: Technological Horizons in Education Journal (THE Journal), vol. 10, no. 6

Pages: 105-109

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Language: English

ISSN: 0192-592X

Conference Paper

Montessori Education and Its Relevance to Educational Reform

Available from: ERIC

Montessori School/Public Schools: A Conference on the Future of Public Montessori Programs (New York, Oct 17-19, 1991)

Educational change, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: This article describes the general principles of the philosophy of Montessori education. The basis of Montessori education is a student-centered learning environment--one that includes provision for an inquisitive, cooperative, safe, and nurturing atmosphere for learning. Students' psychosocial needs must be addressed before their cognitive needs, so that students will enjoy learning and become life-long learners. Montessori education has developed two sets of practices with regard to teacher preparation and classroom environment that facilitate student-centered environments. Montessori teacher education programs focus on training teachers in observational skill and child development. Teachers are educated in developmental levels and in matching appropriate skills and activities to levels. Appropriate materials facilitate the development of physical, intellectual, and social independence. Characteristics of the Montessori classroom include: teachers who are educated in the Montessori method; partnership with the family; a multi-aged, multi-graded, heterogeneous grouping of students; a diverse set of Montessori materials, activities, and experiences; a schedule that allows time for problem solving; connections between knowing and creating; and a classroom atmosphere that encourages social interaction for cooperative learning, peer teaching, and emotional development. The paper concludes with comments regarding the positive aspects of multi-age grouping.

Language: English

Published: New York City, NY: American Montessori Society, Oct 1991

Pages: 7 p.

Article

IMAC Presents Testimony before U.S. Department of Education

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 1, 4

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

Reflections on the Internationality of Montessori Education

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 20, no. 3

Pages: 40-44

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Abstract/Notes: One of the major components of Dr. Montessori's plan for peace education is a curriculum that de-emphasizes nationalism. The "big picture" of the cultural curriculum encourages the perspective that people are citizens of Earth first, and only secondarily American, Japanese, Polish, or other nationalities. Through the fundamental needs material, children learn that all people on all continents throughout history had and have the same basic needs. In preindustrial times, geographic context, together with local natural resources, determined how different groups of people met their needs. And because this is still true, the Montessori geography curriculum is not limited to land and water forms and political borders, but necessarily extends to the people who inhabit other places. It teaches that other people are much like everyone else in terms of basic needs, but that they may meet those needs in very different ways; and children learn to respect those differences. Such a perspective is developed in Montessori settings even where little ethnic, religious, or social diversity exists, as long as a quality program is in place. Additionally, planetwide problems that Montessori may not have specifically anticipated, such as global warming, necessitate new attitudes and curricula that form and emphasize an "ecopsychological" awareness. This article examines the relevance of Montessori education to international schools: When properly integrated, Montessori complements and enhances many aspects of an international school, but when misapplied or partially applied, the obstacles that result can be quite difficult to overcome.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Peace and Education: A Resolution

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 11, no. 3

Pages: 16–17

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Montessori 교육에서 자유개념과 작업 [Freedom Concepts and Tasks in Montessori Education]

Available from: RISS

Publication: Montessori교육연구 [Montessori Education Research], vol. 2

Pages: 149-165

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Language: Korean

ISSN: 1226-9417

Book Section

Play and Learning in Early Childhood Education: The Contribution of High Scope, Reggio Emilia, and Montessori Pedagogical Approaches

Available from: IGI Global

Book Title: Early Childhood Education From an Intercultural and Bilingual Perspective

Pages: 147-163

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Abstract/Notes: The key role of toys and play in early years education has been highlighted by several childhood pedagogues such as Froebel, Montessori, Weikart, and Malaguzzi, among many others. It is consensual among the international educational community that children now spend far more time being instructed an...

Language: English

Published: Hershey, Pennsylvania: IGI Global, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-5225-5167-6

Report

Montessori Pre-School Education: Final Report

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Americas, Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In order to investigate the effectiveness of Montessori preschool education as compared with non-Montessori preschool education, Phase I of this study matched 2 groups, each of 21 preschool children, on intelligence quotient and certain socio-economic factors. One group attended a Montessori preschool and the other a non-Montessori preschool. The children were administered tests near the beginning and end of the preschool year to determine any differences in achievement due to the preschool training. In Phase II a trained researcher interviewed the primary grade teachers who by then had some of the preschool children of Phase I in their classrooms. Ratings of these teachers provided information on the personality and ability of 3 groups of children, (1) former Montessori preschool children, (2) former non-Montessori preschool children, and (3) non-preschool children. The children were rated on 8 major traits which contained 27 stimulus variables. Phase I data indicated that Montessori preschool children gained significantly more in verbal ability than non-Montessori preschool children. Phase II data indicated that Montessori children were superior to the children of the other 2 groups in reading readiness, interest in learning, independence, interpersonal relations, leadership, and learning ability. No differences were found in creativity or ability to adjust to the traditional-type school.

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., Jun 1967

Article

Reforming Public Education: The IMS Montessori Approach

Available from: Internet Archive

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 29, no. 4

Pages: 1, 4

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

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