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Book Section

Nurturing a Democratic Community in the Classroom

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: Making Sense of Education: Fifteen Contemporary Educational Theorists in Their Own Words

Pages: 63-69

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Abstract/Notes: Thayer-Bacon tells her story in a conversational tone that traces her personal and professional roots as she describes various chapters of her life: first as a philosopher, how she became involved in education, and then how that involvement became a career as a philosopher of education, in a large teacher education program, and now at a research institution. She sketches her philosophical contributions, as a pragmatist, feminist, postmodernist, and cultural studies scholar, to philosophy, philosophy of education, and education.

Language: English

Published: Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer, 2012

ISBN: 978-94-007-4017-4

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of Creative Movement Presentations on Dance Participation and Student Attitudes Towards Dance in a Montessori Early Childhood Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education, Movement education

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Abstract/Notes: This action research study examined the impact of creative movement presentations on dance participation and student attitudes towards dance in one outdoor Montessori early childhood classroom during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants were 13 kindergarten and lower elementary students, ages 5-8, and the researcher, their teacher. Students were presented creative movement activities eight times during circle time over four weeks. They were also given opportunities to dance freely once a week for six weeks and asked three times to respond to statements regarding their attitudes towards dance; pre-intervention, mid-intervention, and post-intervention. Data was collected using observations of dance participation, field notes about circle time presentations, and student self-assessment regarding their attitudes towards dance. There was some improvement in attitudes towards dance and an increase in dance participation. Many children expressed enjoyment and the researcher felt inclined to continue providing free dance opportunities and creative movement presentations at circle. The researcher encourages other educators to incorporate dance opportunities in class free time and curriculum lessons.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

Thesis

Individual Experiences with Montessori and Traditional Classrooms: A Qualitative Comparison

Available from: Kalamazoo College Digital Archive

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Abstract/Notes: Theories about education date back to the seventeenth century as philosophers began to debate the practicality of formal education. Through these conversations, certain beliefs about the human nature and the child rose to the forefront and influenced the creation of school curriculums. Further research regarding the psychology of the child proved many of these assumptions to be false. The aim of the present study is to analyze two current educational systems (i.e., the traditional curriculum and the Montessori curriculum) to determine their efficacy in creating a positive experience for the student. To do this, interviews were conducted with 10 college-aged adults (M= 23 years); five who went through a traditional school program and five who went through a Montessori program. The qualitative data were analyzed using the Grounded Theory Approach to reveal three common influences: quality of the teachers, freedom of choice/autonomy, and size of the class. While these factors are not curriculum specific, further exploration of the core Montessori principles reveal that the method has a greater potential of facilitating a positive experience as the curriculum inherently considers the child's development at every stage. Further research should consider analyzing the academic implications of each program.

Language: English

Published: Kalamazoo, Michigan, 2013

Report

Attitudes toward Multiple Aged Classrooms of Third, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Grade Students

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigated students' attitudes toward multi-age classrooms, specifically examining differences in attitudes based on gender and grade level. The Multiage Attitude Survey was administered at the end of the school year to students in two multi-age classrooms: one classroom with 11 third-grade and 10 fourth-grade students, the other with 11 fifth-grade and 13 sixth-grade students. Results revealed no significant difference in attitudes based on gender. However, differences were found in grade level attitudes. Correlations between grade level and negative attitudes toward multi-age classrooms indicated that the higher grade-level students (fourth graders and sixth graders) had more negative attitudes toward the multiple groupings than did younger students in each classroom.

Language: English

Published: [S.I.], 1993

Article

Do Didactic Materials Belong in the Infant & Toddler Classroom?

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 35, no. 1

Pages: 26-33

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Setting the table, feeding themselves, cleaning the table, washing dishes, cleaning spills, blowing their nose, helping with laundry, watering the garden, washing the tables, cleaning the windows, recycling trash/food, pouring their milk, and preparing food-these activities are all totally engaging to the older infant and toddler. Since we work in a Montessori community, there are always spare Sensorial materials in the closets. [...]Montessori Early Childhood adult learners have approximately 35-40 hours of classroom time studying the Sensorial materials, an additional 15 or more hours of practice (alone and with other adults), and extensive practice with children during their practicum in preparation for an examination before certification. While we Infant & Toddler educators focus on the skill of observation of the child's development to meet the infant's and toddler's needs, Early Childhood educators have thoroughly engaged in the study of when, how, and in what sequence to present didactic materials to engage the child from 3 to 6.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Communication and Collaboration Across Student Support Teams and Montessori Classroom Teachers

Available from: Northeastern University Libraries

Collaboration, Montessori method of education - Teachers, Montessori schools, Teachers, Teachers' assistants

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Abstract/Notes: Communication and collaboration between classroom teachers and student support teachers are critical in supporting student outcomes, and effective and productive lifelong relationships. The purpose of this action research study was to investigate the current process of obtaining student support at a Montessori school to improve the communication and collaboration between classroom teachers and student support teachers to and strengthen and clarify the process and to better support one another as educators who use two different methodologies of instruction to support students struggling with academic or social-emotional issues in the classroom. Participants and data collected in Cycle 1 consisted of interviews with classroom teachers, student support teachers, and school administrators. Additionally, a document review of current resources and forms used at the research site were analyzed. Action steps including the creation of new materials and training. Cycle 2 launched a co-created framework for scaffolding the communication between classroom and their student support team partners outside of the classroom. Findings included a desire to collaborate, a need for support and training, and the necessity of systems and structures in the institution that can exist regardless of faculty and staff turnover. Implications for the organization included opportunities to re-engage teachers with professional development, training, and structure to support their work with students and each other.

Language: English

Published: Boston, Massachusetts, 2023

Article

Helping Children with Attentional Challenges in a Montessori Classroom: The Role of the Physician

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 2

Pages: 355-423

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: Maureen Murphy-Ryan offers a clinical look at attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Her thorough definition of ADHD and the diagnoses that may occur simultaneously offer teachers an awareness of what this could look like in a classroom. However, it is only with professional medical input that a true diagnosis can be made and appropriate interventions can be put in place. Behavioral interventions are outlined, as well as the extremely sensitive issue of medication. By partnering these support systems with the Montessori environment and creating a conversation that includes the needs of the child and family, there is a greater chance to successfully help children find their focus. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Finding the Hook: Montessori Strategies to Support Concentration," October 6-9, 2016, in Columbia, MD.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Technology in the Montessori Classroom: Benefits, Hazards, and Preparation for Life

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 2

Pages: 99-107

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: Greg MacDonald cites much research on the pros and cons of technology for children of all ages and gives the reader the information and space to sort out what their own policy will be. He supports the use of computers in elementary classrooms if there is a practical purpose, a group project, or no alternative approach available, such as for digital art work. Greg suggests that sensorial avenues should be "explored and exhausted" before turning to digital devices. [This paper was originally published in the "AMI/USA Journal," 3rd Edition, 2015. Reprinted with permission.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis

Assessment and Instructional Decision-Making in Montessori Early Childhood Classrooms

Available from: American Montessori Society

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Language: English

Published: Moraga, California, 2008

Article

Enacting Attention: Concentration and Shared Focus in Montessori Classrooms

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 24, no. 4

Pages: 18-20,22-26

Work periods

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Abstract/Notes: Concentration is a "sine qua non," a hallmark, of a Montessori Casa program. Yet, it happens that some children do not concentrate. They do not engage with the materials in the classic pattern of normalization. They are not challenged by ADD, ADHD, or a variant of sensory integration spectrum disorder. Instead of working alone, they prefer the company of others; they prefer to learn with others. One may wonder if their natural intelligence is interpersonal. Based on studies of brain development and findings from recent ethnographic research, this article describes a type of attention called "shared focus." Ethnographic research was conducted in Casa classrooms, located in four Montessori schools, during a 3-year period, beginning in 2008. The research involved observing classrooms and interviewing school staff, teachers, and children. "Children who do not concentrate" was a common concern raised by the teachers in those classrooms. A review of brain development research suggests concentration is a type of attention. Children may use a type of attention called shared focus when, for example, they laugh and run together on the playground, and when they leave their parents during morning arrival. Some children may also more naturally use this type of attention instead of concentration during the work period. (Contains 1 table.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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