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951 results

Article

Bringing French into the Classroom through Games

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter

Pages: 14–15

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Language: English

Book Section

Montessori Language Practices Meet the Needs of All Learners: The Montessori Early Childhood Inclusive Classroom: Creating a Cherished Experience

Available from: Rowman and Littlefield

Book Title: The Inclusive Classroom: Creating a Cherished Experience through Montessori

Pages: 83-102

Children with disabilities, Classroom environments, Inclusive education, Language acquisition, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Prepared environment, Special education

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Language: English

Published: Lanham, Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-4758-5635-4

AudioRecording

Folk Tunes and Music of the Masters Adapted for the Classroom

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Abstract/Notes: SIDE A: Band I –– March (Old French Bugle Call) – Run (Russian Folk Tune) – March (Serbian Folk Tune) – Run (Puerto Rican Folk Tune) – March (Jewish Folk Tune) – Run (German Folk Tune) – March (Dutch Folk Tune) – Run (Lithuanian Folk Tune) – March (Soldier's March, Schumann) – Run (Danish Folk Tune) // Band II –– Gallop (Venezuelian Folk Tune) – March (Ukranian Folk Tune) – Run (Pillow Dance, J. Strauss Sr.) – March (from "Carmen", Bizet) – Gallop (Styrian Folk Tune) – March (Hungarian Folk Tune) – Run (from "Orpheus in the Underworld", Offenbach) // Band III –– Slow Walk (French Lullaby) – Gallop (Irish Folk Tune) – March (German Folk Tune, Theme in 4th Movement, Beethoven: Septet Op. 20) – Run (Czech Folk Tune) – Slow Walk (Italian Lullaby) – Gallop (Greek Folk Tune) – March (French Folk Tune, Theme for Variations Suite #5, Handel) – Skip (Swiss Folk Tune) // SIDE B: Band I –– Trot (Ecossaise: Schubert) – Slow Walk (American Lullaby) – Gallop (from: "Fidelio", Beethoven) – March (Polish March Song) – Trot (from: "Trio op. 14 #1", Mozart) – Slow Walk (Basque Folk Tune) – Run-March (English Folk Tune) – Skip (Norwegian Folk Tune) – Slow Walk (Neapolitan Folk Tune) // Band II –– Waltz Step (Portuguese Folk Tune) – Run March (Polish Folk Tune) – Trot (from: "The Masked Ball", Verdi) – Waltz Step (American Cowboy Song) – Gallop (from: Sonatina op. 100, Dvorak) – Slow Walk (The Little Boat: Mendelssohn) – Trot (Finnish Folk Tune) – Waltz Step (Catalonian Folk Tune) – March-Run-March (German Folk Tune) – Slow March (from "Iphigeni En Tauride", Gluck) // Band III –– Polka (American Folk Tune) – Waltz Step (Slovenian Folk Tune) – Skip (Scotch Folk Tune) – Slow March (from: "Caro Mio Ben", Giordani) – Polka (Danish Folk Tune) – March (French Folk Tune, arr. in L'Arlesienne Suite #2, Bizet) – Run (from: Quartet Op. 74 #2, Haydn) – Waltz Step (Czechosolovakian Folk Tune)

Language: English

Archival Material Or Collection

Summer School, Montessori method, interior classroom

Available from: University of Pennsylvania - University Archives (JSTOR)

Montessori schools, Montessori schools - Photographs

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Abstract/Notes: Teachers and students in the University of Pennsylvania's Summer School, observe children learning basic mathematical concepts using Montessori methods at the University's Psychological Clinic, ca. 1915.

Language: English

Article

The Slowdown of the Multiage Classroom: What Was Once a Popular Approach Has Fallen Victim to NCLB Demands for Grade-Level Testing

Available from: ERIC

Publication: School Administrator, vol. 62, no. 3

Pages: 22

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author discusses multiage education. Multiage education hailed as recently as 10 years ago as a promising way to restructure schools and boost student achievement but now has fallen on hard times. Interest in the issue has waned, with new research on the topic virtually nonexistent and attendance at national multiage conferences a fraction of what it once was. Schools across the country are cutting existing multiage programs, or choosing not to begin new ones. Even the state of Kentucky, which in 1990 heralded ungraded primary education as a linchpin of its sweeping school reform effort, has seen the scope of its multiage initiative reduced by half. Some trace the decline of multiage education to No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and its emphasis on standardized, grade-level testing. A list of additional resources and Web sites concludes this article.

Language: English

ISSN: 0036-6439

Article

Our Long, Winding Road to Multiage Classrooms

Available from: ERIC

Publication: School Administrator, vol. 62, no. 3

Pages: 24

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Abstract/Notes: As teachers and schools are held more accountable for students passing the tests within a designated time frame, the pressure on teachers requires them to work and plan smarter. It takes incredibly talented and dedicated teachers to pull off the multiage program while still meeting all of the state's testing requirements. Educators must continue to work with lawmakers so they understand that teaching and testing with no regard to a child's developmental stage is not a true measure of a student's ability. This article describes a pilot grade 5/6 mutiage classroom. The class was a heterogeneous group. The teacher developed a two-year-long plan to teach her students.

Language: English

ISSN: 0036-6439

Article

The Outdoor Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 4

Pages: 17

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Bringing the Classroom Outside

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 1

Pages: 19

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Do Multiage Classrooms Help Students Succeed?

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: General Music Today, vol. 12, no. 1

Pages: 28-31

Academic achievement, Americas, Early childhood care and education, Music - Instruction and study, Nongraded schools, North America, Student attitudes, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Reviews research about the effects of multiage grouping particularly focusing on the differences in achievement and attitudes between students in multiage and single-grade classes and the implications of those differences. Maintains that the value of multiage instruction rests in its ability to foster positive self-esteem and enhance student attitudes toward school. (CMK)

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/104837139801200107

ISSN: 1048-3713

Report

Effects of the Multiage Classroom on Children

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This study examined the impact of the multiage classroom on second, third, and fourth graders in an Elkhart, Indiana elementary school. One classroom from each grade participated in the multiage classroom. The classroom of 70 students was combined for at least 1 afternoon per week during the 1995-96 school year. During February, the classroom was combined for four afternoons per week. Results indicated that students in the multiage group had better attendance than the general school population. To determine the effects of the multiage classroom on social skills, the teachers maintained a journal on six students who had not shown appropriate social behaviors in the regular classroom. A point system was implemented in which these students were rewarded with points for three desirable social skills. Four of the six target students demonstrated appropriate social skills during the time observed. Parents' responses to surveys suggested that the parents accepted the program and had a positive attitude toward it. At the beginning and end of the study period, children were surveyed orally on their attitudes to the multiage classroom. Results were mixed with regard to whether they liked to be in a multiage class. Sociometric techniques revealed that, across the time of the study, second and third graders' willingness to work with children of other ages increased, and the fourth graders' willingness declined. Appendixes contain the parent and student surveys. (KDFB)

Language: English

Published: Elkhart, Indiana, Apr 24, 1996

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