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419 results

Master's Thesis

Circle Time Norms in Early Childhood Montessori Programs: A Survey of Montessori Teachers Across the United States

Available from: MINDS@UW River Falls

Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education - Teachers, North America, Rituals, Teachers, Three-hour work cycle, United States of America, Work periods

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Abstract/Notes: This study examined the nature of circle time within early childhood Montessori classrooms in the United States of America. We explored literature pertaining to the history and development of circle time as well as circle time research in preschool and kindergarten settings. Unable to find writings or research specific to Montessori circle time practices, we crafted a 30-question survey for early childhood Montessori teachers to determine basic information about their circle time approaches. The survey asked participants about demographic information, circle time logistics, circle time activities, reactions to circle time, planning and preparation, and the morning work cycle. Using social media and direct emails, we gathered over 300 responses from 50 states and the District of Columbia; a total of 276 participants completed the full survey. Results focused on five different areas: time - the frequency, duration, and scheduling of circle time; attendance - who joined circle time and for how long; teacher preparation - participants’ training and planning approaches; circle time programming - the most common and popular activities; the morning work cycle – its relation to circle time. Results revealed that 92% of survey participants have circle time every day or most days; most participants hold circle time as the last event of the morning for generally 20 minutes or less; the most common circle time events were show and tell, calendar work, vocabulary lessons, Grace and Courtesy lessons, read aloud discussions, dancing and movement, snack time, general conversation, read aloud (stories), and birthday celebrations. Most participants had a work cycle that lasts less than three hours. This study promotes reflection on the importance and meaning of circle time in Montessori classrooms in relation to its apparent absence in Dr. Montessori’s writings.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2021

Article

Circle Time

Publication: Infants and Toddlers, vol. 10, no. 3

Pages: 15–17

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Understanding Circle Time Practices in Montessori Early Childhood Settings

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 1-27

Circle time, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Teachers, Montessori schools, Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: Circle time is commonplace in traditional preschools, yet there are few references to the practice in Montessori’s writings or in major Montessori organizations’ and teacher education standards. This article investigates whether circle time is frequent in Montessori 3–6-year-old classrooms using data from a widely distributed Qualtrics survey. The results, from 276 respondents spanning all 50 states, provide insight into the circle time practices of United States-based preschool Montessori teachers, also known in Montessori classrooms as guides. We present novel information regarding circle time duration and frequency, types of circle time activities, Montessori guides’ circle time training and planning, whether children’s circle time attendance is free choice or compulsory, and the nature of circle time in programs associated with Association Montessori Internationale versus American Montessori Society. Results revealed that 92% of survey participants have circle time every day or most days; most participants hold circle time for 20 minutes or less; the most common circle time events were show-and-tell, calendar work, vocabulary lessons, Grace and Courtesy lessons, read aloud discussions, dancing and movement, snack time, general conversation, read aloud (stories), and birthday celebrations. We found that many of the most frequent circle time activities do not align with children’s preferences, teacher preferences, or Early Childhood best practices. Our work invites Montessorians to engage in the work of reconstructing the traditional practice of circle time to better align with Montessori hallmarks of choice, development of the will, and joyfulness.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v9i2.20962

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Circle Time

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 76

Pages: 24–26

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

The Magic of Circle Times and Community Meetings

Publication: Tomorrow's Child, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 19–20

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Best of Times, Worst of Times, Changing Times

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 12

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Circletime [Songs for classroom management]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 17, no. 1

Pages: 12

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Language: English

Article

Circletime [Poems]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 17, no. 3

Pages: 12

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Language: English

Article

Circletime

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 18, no. 2

Pages: 12

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Abstract/Notes: songs and poems about summer

Language: English

Article

Circletime [Songs]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 17, no. 2

Pages: 12

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Language: English

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