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1048 results

Report

Head Start, Early Head Start, and Montessori

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

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Abstract/Notes: Programs receiving Head Start funding are free to implement a high-quality Montessori program. Montessori programs can use multiple funding streams inside one Head Start classroom. Early Head Start and Head Start regulations allow mixed-age classrooms as long as the requirements for each age group are met or exceeded. Non-profit Montessori programs can be eligible to receive Head Start and Early Head Start funding.

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 2016

Doctoral Dissertation

Head Start Teachers' Descriptions of Inclusion

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Americas, Head Start programs, Inclusive education, North America, Teachers, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: A Head Start program in Southeast Georgia, teachers were struggling to provide appropriate services to students with special needs (SWSN) in inclusive settings. The purpose of this study was to explore Head Start teacher descriptions of their roles and the barriers that inhibit implementation of inclusive education for SWSN. McKenzie and Zascavage’s model of inclusion formed the conceptual framework that guided this study. The research questions for this study addressed teacher descriptions of their roles and the barriers that inhibit the implementation of inclusive teaching strategies. A basic qualitative design was used to capture the insights of 12 purposefully selected Head Start inclusion teachers through semi structured interviews. Themes were identified through open coding. The trustworthiness of the study was established through member checking, rich and detailed descriptions, and researcher reflexivity. The findings revealed that Head Start teachers are challenged in the role of teaching SWSN, and they need time and resource support to prioritize learning needs of this special population and additional training to improve instructional strategies. This study has implications for positive social change through the identification of strategies to overcome the challenges faced by Head Start teachers in inclusive classrooms and the identification of resources and training needs to improve the quality of services provided by Head Start teachers for the benefit of SWSN.

Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2022

Article

Possibility: Head Start - One Reality: MSCM Creates Two Innovative Projects to Serve Baltimore Head Start Children

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 8, no. 3

Pages: 25

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Master's Thesis

The Extent That Montessori Programs Contribute to Students' Academic and Social Gains and How Montessori Programs Differ from Traditional Programs

Available from: Google Scholar

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this paper, through a review of current research, is to compare and contrast the Montessori Method and traditional programs and to identify the extent of the social and academic benefit from each. Researchers have found that there are some academic advantages to both programs. However, the academic gains that a child makes in traditional prekindergarten programs appear to diminish as the child gets older. Socially, children who have attended Montessori programs appear to enjoy school and have better relationships with peers and teachers than those in traditional program. An important thing to note is much of this research is inconclusive because of sampling bias due to study design. It is my recommendation that some of the aspects of Montessori education be incorporated into the traditional programs and that this continue as a supplement to the regular school day. Perhaps if students continue to be provided with additional support as they are in prekindergarten, the academic gains experienced as a result could be longer lasting.

Language: English

Published: Marquette, Michigan, 2009

Report

Evaluation of Prekindergarten Head Start. Year End Report, 1975-1976.

Available from: ERIC

Child development, Children with disabilities, Classroom environment, Classroom environment, Early childhood education, Head Start programs, Nongraded schools, Observation (Educational method), Parent-teacher relationships, Prepared environment, Teacher-student relationships

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Abstract/Notes: The Philadelphia Prekindergarten Head Start program is a child development program for three and four-year-old children from low income families which stresses an interacting and multi-disciplinary attempt to improve the child's physical and emotional health, his family relationships, and his abilities to function better as a person. The program was designed from the beginning to implement five different early childhood educational models (Bank Street, Behavior Analysis, Montessori, Open Classroom, and Responsive Learning). The 1975-1976 evaluation activities for Philadelphia's Prekindergarten Head Start program continued to focus on the major goals for children. There was found to be some range in practices among centers in terms of (1) extent of model implementation, (2) classroom differences within a model, (3) number of parent volunteers, (4) grouping practices, and (5) provisioning. Observation data yielding the above information are summarized according to model and across the total program. The Denver Developmental Screening Test (D.D.S.T.) was administered during October and April to 82% and 84% of the population respectively. In April only 1.8% of the population was identified as having a developmental delay as defined by the D.D.S.T., a decrease of about 40% from the Fall administration. While Prekindergarten Head Start children are from families of low socio-economic status, the April D.D.S.T. results confirmed, as was the case in 1974-1975, that the population screened had improved after a year of program participation so that there were far fewer children "at risk" than were found in the norming population. (Author/MV)

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Jul 1976

Article

Expand the Head Start Program By Revamping Chapter 1

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 18, no. 1

Pages: 131-134

Early childhood education, Head Start programs

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Abstract/Notes: Examines the failure of Project Follow Through and Chapter 1 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to sustain the progress made by Head Start through the school years. Discusses the Head Start Transition Project, established in demonstration sites in each state, which seeks to ease the transition of children from Head Start through the primary grades. (BC)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Report

Two Kinds of Kindergarten After Four Types of Head Start

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Results are reported at the end of the second year of a 3-year comparison of four prekindergarten programs: Bereiter-Engelmann, DARCEE, Montessori and Traditional. A number of classes in each program style were used with 246 four-year-olds in Head Start. Children were tested early in the year, at the end of the year, and at the end of kindergarten on a battery of tests and rating scales, including Stanford-Binet, Preschool Inventory, Curiosity Box, Replacement Puzzle, Dog & Bone, Behavior Inventory and Embedded Figures. The kindergarten experience was systematically varied. One replication of the original experiment entered a Follow Through kindergarten, the remainder of the experimental children entered Regular Kindergarten, a non-academic program. A video-tape monitoring procedure developed previously was used to analyze differences among kindergarten programs. Data were examined from several aspects. (1) Did Follow Through and regular kindergarten classes differ in expected dimensions? (2) Did Follow Through produce greater gains than regular kindergarten? (3) Were there interactions between type of Head Start and type of kindergarten? (4) To what extent were Head Start gains maintained irrespective of type of kindergarten? (5) Were there sex effects or sex interactions? Results are discussed in terms of need for finer analysis of program dimensions as related to specific effects. (Author/AJ)

Language: English

Published: Louisville, Kentucky, 1971

Book

A Comparative Study of the Impact of Two Contrasting Educational Approaches in Head Start, 1968-69

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: As part of a national evaluation of Head Start, a comparison of school readiness and childhood development approaches to preschool education was attempted, but major methodological problems were encountered. It was not possible to find the study samples called for in the original plan, i.e. a child-readiness program of the Bereiter-Engelmann type, and a child development program that was a suitable example. A compromise selection of two Head Start centers included one that was child development-oriented, and one that had a modified Montessori program. A comparison sample was selected from a middle class child development-oriented private nursery school. The children were pre- and posttested on measures of cognitive skills, curiosity, self-concept, and spontaneous language. Individual child observations were also made. However, the original data collection plan was severely curtailed because of lack of time and testing space. The results of the study are not definitive but indicate that the middle class children were more able to benefit in demonstrable ways from a year of preschool education. However, the private program was judged to be of much better quality than the Head Start programs in the study.

Language: English

Published: New York, New York: Bank Street College of Education, 1969

Report

The Effects of Montessori Educational Techniques on Culturally Disadvantaged Head Start Children

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: To determine whether significant differences exist in skill performance as a result of head start experience and to determine whether these differences exist between two ethnic groups, 17 Anglo-American [White] and 62 Mexican American [Latino] culturally disadvantaged children were pre-tested and post-tested during the summer of 1965 in connection with six-week head start programs in Costa Mesa and Fullerton, California. Five teachers using modified Montessori materials stressed three developmental areas, (1) perceptual-motor, (2) social-emotional, and (3) intellectual-academic. Seven instruments were used to test the program's effectiveness--Gesell Maturation Index, Mateer Inversion Test, tests of dominance, teacher rating scale, Goodenough-Harris D-A-P, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, and wide range achievement test. Results showed that certain handicaps do exist among culturally disadvantaged children prior to school experience and that positive gains occurred when enrichment experiences were provided. Greatest gains were in the areas of intellectual-academic and social-emotional skills. Ethnic differences appeared in the linguistic skills limitations of the Mexican American children. Need for medical and dental attention was apparent in both groups. Future provision should be made for continued preschool education and wider dissemination of health services. (LG)

Language: English

Published: Fullerton, California, Sep 1965

Report

Experimental Variation of Head Start Curricula: A Comparison of Current Approaches, Annual Progress Report, June 1, 1969 - May 31, 1970

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Two major questions were raised in regard to four types of preschool programs. (1) Do programs differ in actual operation as well as descriptively? (2) Do programs have significantly different effects on children? Analysis of data obtained on samples of four classrooms in each of three programs (Bereiter-Engelmann, DARCEE, Traditional) and two classrooms in the fourth program (Montessori), showed clear differences. Despite within-program teacher differences on variables assessed by monitoring procedures (observation, television), results provide no evidence that the teachers' (N=14) characteristics were a source of difference among programs. Results also indicate that a brief four to eight week teacher training program supplemented by visits from consultants is adequate for identifiable program implementation. The four programs did have significantly different effects on children's cognitive, social, and/or motivational development. The immediate effects of Bereiter-Engelmann and DARCEE were statistically significant in academic and motivational development. The effects of Bereiter-Engelmann were largely confined to cognitive and academic areas. The effects of DARCEE were more diffuse and most evident in the areas of motivation and attitudes. Sex differences occurred. In general, results indicate that the immediate impact was superior for the two most didactic programs. (WY)

Language: English

Published: Louisville, Kentucky, May 31, 1970

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