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511 results

Article

Remote Learning

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 32, no. 3

Pages: 15

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Conference Paper

mLearning in Primary Education: An Online Teacher Training Proposal Based on Montessori Education Principles

Available from: IATED Digital Library

12th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies

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Abstract/Notes: Mlearning is learning through digital mobile environments, making it possible to acquire, interrelate and share new knowledge through mobile devices. There is a consensus on the growth of the use of these devices for different educational actions. According to Sarrab, Elgamel & Aldabbas (2012), there are different recreational and pedagogical uses based on mlearning. According to De Araújo Junior et al (2019), these uses are based on the possibility of combining more than one methodology and learning strategies in line with students’ learning characteristics and needs. To this end, mlearning seeks to integrate learning theories, especially constructivist and behavioral theories to also create collaborative working environments (Crompton, Burke & Gregory, 2017). The greatest advantage of mlearning is the possibility of it being applied pedagogically beyond the school environment, with the participation of families and with various proposals for interaction between teacher-student, student-student, and teacher-student-families. This whole range of possibilities has created a new field of study. By overcoming the design approach on mlearning environments and their different effects (Devinder Singh & Zaitun, 2006), a new line of research is becoming relevant: the role of teachers and their training in the use of this technology. Sanchez-Prieto & Hernández García (2019) point out that despite its advantages, the number of teachers using this technology is still very limited. A bibliographic review of 7 scientific articles related to the use of mlearning in primary classes within different educational contexts identified that teachers still lack, not only technical and/or pedagogical but also comprehensive training, making it difficult for them to become familiar with this technology and applying it as another teaching tool in their primary classes. Considering the needs found regarding digital teacher competence, the basis of digital interaction between teacher-student-families and the assessment, selection, and design of didactic contents, this study is an integral part of the Koulu I +D project (Mobile learning in primary education) number ID19-XX-003, aims to present a proposal for teacher training taught within an online learning environment. It does so regarding the basis, application and use of mlearning in primary classes based on the principles of Montessori education: personal choice of the student, collaborative learning, self-direction, the teacher as a guide and learning by discovery. To this end, the training model is based on these points to guide the work using mlearning by considering the characteristics and needs of primary education, regardless of the tool’s typology. The training proposal is based on providing the necessary teaching knowledge to conduct the pedagogical work at the comprehension, application and assessment levels of mlearning in primary classes. The training was designed as an online format to overcome the first barrier for some teachers: the use of technology. The defined points of training to meet the demands of the application in primary classes are: Digital teacher competence, Montessori and Mlearning Pedagogy, Pedagogical tools and the possibilities of primary education and mlearning Assessment in primary education.

Language: English

Published: Online Conference: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2020

Pages: 7979-7983

DOI: 10.21125/edulearn.2020.2004

ISBN: 978-84-09-17979-4

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Remote Learning – The Future of Education: Effective Instructional Strategies Used by Parent Educators and Recommendations for Building Capacity

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Comparative education, Remote learning

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Language: English

Published: Amherst, Massachusetts, 2022

Doctoral Dissertation

The Potentiality of Play: The Shifting Design Language of Play-Based Learning

Available from: Edinburgh Napier University

Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Play, Student-centered learning

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Abstract/Notes: This thesis, underpinned by cross-cultural design ethnography (DE) and research through design (RtD), re-reads play-based learning constructs as design practice. In doing so, it charts the shifting relationship between design and theories of play-based learning. The work frames the design of play-based learning processes, from their emergence in historical learning environments such as the Montessori method to current pedagogies of STEAM learning. This evolutionary focus will be of interest to a wide range of stakeholders such as pedagogues, designers, and policy makers, each of whom contribute to where, what and how children are taught. This thesis presents the following arguments: Firstly, it frames and re-reads key historical play pedagogues as designers and design thinkers, whose work has shaped and influenced the evolution of play-based learning through the inception of play artefacts, spaces, and structures. This thesis further elucidates that design-thinking has been at the heart of play-based learning, demonstrated through the design of modular and standardised pedagogic objects and spaces of historic learning environments. The design evolution within this framework helps to enlighten the development of tinkering and iterative prototyping as twenty-first century affordances of learning through play. Secondly, this thesis uses observation-based design ethnography of the Montessori method, to argue that Montessori’s restrictive pedagogy can be counterproductive to learning through intuitive processes of exploration and iteration. Thirdly, by adapting the practice-based research method of research through design (RtD), the thesis demonstrates and proposes that twenty-first century design affordances of tinkering and iteration can be suitably integrated to enrich historic play-based learning environments such as the Montessori method. In each of these arguments, the ways in which pedagogic theories of play are interwoven with the language of design thinking are revealed. By bringing into focus the triad of play, pedagogy, and design, an additional educational landscape of twenty-first century cultural learning environments is explored. Cultural learning environments (CLEs) such as museums and public galleries extend the scope of play-based learning beyond formalised spaces of schools and bring into relief, the predominance of design while incepting platforms, ateliers, and activities to initiate learning through play.

Language: English

Published: Edinburgh, Scotland, 2021

Article

Task-based Language Learning in Bilingual Montessori Elementary Schools: Customizing Foreign Language Learning and Promoting L2 Speaking Skills

Available from: Universität Bern (Switzerland)

Publication: Linguistik Online, vol. 54, no. 4

Pages: 69-83

Bilingualism, Language acquisition

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Abstract/Notes: Foreign language learning has been a part of German elementary schools for several years now. Montessori schools focusing on individual learning, i.e. mostly independent from the teacher and based on auto-education, interest, and free choice, are also asked to teach an L2. The original lack of a concept of L2 learning for this environment has brought forth different approaches. Bilingual education seems to be feasible and applicable in Montessori education. The downside to this is that even in a bilingual classroom the Montessori way of learning may not allow for very much oral production of the foreign language. The role of L2 production (cf. Swain 1985, 1995, 2005) for language acquisition has been theoretically claimed and empirically investigated. Output can have a positive influence on L2 learning (cf. e.g. Izumi 2002, Keck et al. 2006). This also applies to interaction (cf. Long 1996), where negotiation of meaning and modified output are factors supporting L2 development (cf. e.g. de la Fuente 2002, McDonough 2005). Task-based Language Learning (TBLL) presents itself as one way to promote oral language production and to provide opportunities for meaning-negotiation. Especially tasks with required information exchange and a closed outcome have been shown to be beneficial for the elicitation of negotiation of meaning and modified output. This paper argues that TBLL is a promising approach for the facilitation of L2 production and thus the development of speaking skills in a Montessori context. It also hypothesizes that TBLL can be implemented in a bilingual Montessori environment while still making the Montessori way of learning possible. Different tasks on various topics, examples of which are presented in this article, can lay the foundation for this. Offering such tasks in a bilingual Montessori elementary classroom promises to foster language production and the use of communication strategies like negotiation of meaning, both being facilitative for L2 acquisition. This hypothesis remains to be tested in future research.

Language: German

DOI: 10.13092/lo.54.284

ISSN: 1615-3014

Article

A Neuroscience-Based Learning Technique: Framework and Application to STEM

Available from: World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology

Publication: International Journal of Educational and Pedagogical Sciences, vol. 14, no. 3

Pages: 197-200

Montessori method of education, Neuroscience, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Existing learning techniques such as problem-based learning, project-based learning, or case study learning are learning techniques that focus mainly on technical details, but give no specific guidelines on learner’s experience and emotional learning aspects such as arousal salience and valence, being emotional states important factors affecting engagement and retention. Some approaches involving emotion in educational settings, such as social and emotional learning, lack neuroscientific rigorousness and use of specific neurobiological mechanisms. On the other hand, neurobiology approaches lack educational applicability. And educational approaches mainly focus on cognitive aspects and disregard conditioning learning. First, authors start explaining the reasons why it is hard to learn thoughtfully, then they use the method of neurobiological mapping to track the main limbic system functions, such as the reward circuit, and its relations with perception, memories, motivations, sympathetic and parasympathetic reactions, and sensations, as well as the brain cortex. The authors conclude explaining the major finding: The mechanisms of nonconscious learning and the triggers that guarantee long-term memory potentiation. Afterward, the educational framework for practical application and the instructors’ guidelines are established. An implementation example in engineering education is given, namely, the study of tuned-mass dampers for earthquake oscillations attenuation in skyscrapers. This work represents an original learning technique based on nonconscious learning mechanisms to enhance long-term memories that complement existing cognitive learning methods.

Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Improving Early Reading Skills of First-Grade Students with Learning Disabilities Using Montessori Learning Strategies

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, People with disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: This study focused on helping students with learning disabilities to improve their listening comprehension and acquire early reading skills of decoding, reading and understanding what a word and two- or -three-word phrases say. Since reading at the advanced stage involves comprehension of sentences and paragraphs, in this study, building the foundation of reading at the word level is the logical place to start. With that skill in place, combining words into a phrase and understanding what it means will be the next step. Meanwhile, helping the students understand what was read to them through questioning builds their listening comprehension skills, which will be a great help in reading comprehension once the students have advanced enough to read sentences and paragraphs. The target group used for this study included six 1st graders with learning disabilities, who had difficulties with reading and comprehending. These 1st graders with learning disabilities were not taught one-on-one due to large class size. They had no knowledge of phonics. They could not relate the sounds they heard to the letters of the alphabet. The curriculum-based assessment (CBA) model was the alternative assessment model that was used to assess the students. The 12-week intensive study focused on two variables: a dependent variable and an independent variable. The dependent variable was reading at the word and phrase level, and the independent variable was word sound, blending vowels, consonant blending, and consonant and vowel blending. The scientific methodology was the single subject model, a 1-minute assessment. Each student was assessed for 1 minute each day for 3 days. The results of the assessment were used to determine the baseline before the intervention implementation. This methodology is also known as "AB Design." AB refers to a two-phase design, the baseline phase and the intervention phase. The intervention phase was introduced after the baseline phase was established and recorded in data format. Intervention data were recorded as well. The data collected were graphed in two phases. The results showed that the students were able to learn how to read and acquire comprehension within the 12 weeks. The reading strategies that were used in this study were based on Montessori's methods, which is a methodology in learning how to decode words which leads to automatic reading. These strategies are being used in Montessori schools throughout Dade County public schools, but not particularly with special education students. The results of this study were positive.

Language: English

Published: Cincinnati, Ohio, 2003

Doctoral Dissertation

An Intergrated Learning Programme for the Knysna Montessori School

Available from: SEALS (South East Academic Libraries System)

Africa, Knysna Montessori School (Knysna, South Africa), Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: In line with Montessori methodology, the Knysna Montessori School runs its programmes in an integrated and holistic manner. Learning programmes are based on a blend of various Montessori learning programmes and the Revised National Curriculum Statement (RNCS). Classes are divided into three year-age groupings; and integrated learning programmes are in place within the pre-school, (including grade R), the grade 1 to 3 class, and the grade 4 to 6 class. However, the grade 7 to 9 Montessori class has been running in a more traditional and less integrated manner since its inception in 2004. That has motivated the undertaking of this study. The main aim of this qualitative study has been to determine how to best arrange the RNCS according to Montessori principles, that is to say, in a holistic and integrated manner, with the intention of presenting a learning programme for the grade 7 to 9 class. This aim was based on a constructivist philosophical foundation and addressed in conjunction with interpretivism and critical theory. The grounded theory research paradigm was followed. In this paradigm research findings are grounded in the data gathering and the analysis. Three methods of data collection were applied, namely a literature review, interviews and document analysis. A literature review was conducted to gain a better overview and understanding of the RNCS and Outcomes-Based Education (OBE). Furthermore, through the literature review, an in-depth understanding of the Montessori method of education, adolescent development and integrated and holistic education have been achieved. Interviews were conducted with staff from the Knysna Montessori School, with the purpose of gathering information on the Knysna Montessori School and its current application to the RNCS, from pre-school to grade 6. An availability and purposive sampling method was applied, in order to determine which staff members to interview. Finally, document analysis was done. The learning areas for the senior phase (grades 7 to 9) of the General Education and Training Band (GET) of the RNCS were coded and analysed in order to discover emergent themes within the RNCS and how these link with the Montessori curriculum arrangement for this age group. It became apparent that Montessori classrooms, both prior to and for the senior phase, are divided into three areas, namely language, mathematics and cultural studies. Based on this knowledge, as well as the documentary analysis, an integrated learning programme, grounded in the data analysis, was designed. It was found that the RNCS matches well with Montessori’s curriculum arrangement. Thus, this learning programme is in line with Montessori’s curriculum arrangement for the senior phase of the GET band. Such a curriculum arrangement integrates the learning outcomes and assessment standards from arts and culture, economic and management sciences, life orientation, natural sciences, social sciences and technology into different studies. These are globally referred to as cultural studies. However, specific attention was also given to moral education, self-expression through music, art and drama, entrepreneurship, career education and sport. The conclusion was reached that an integrated learning programme, based on Montessori principles and in line with the RNCS requirement, is possible for the Knysna Montessori School.

Language: English

Published: Port Elizabeth, South Africa, 2010

Article

Early Signs of Specific Learning Disabilities in Early Childhood

Available from: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE)

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood Special Education (INT-JECSE), vol. 12, no. 1

Pages: 84-95

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Abstract/Notes: Since comprehensive evaluation of academic skills cannot be extensively conducted in early childhood, specific learning disabilities cannot be diagnosed in preschool-aged children. To evaluate academic skills, children must be school-aged and interventions cannot begin in the preschool period. However, specific learning disabilities in children may also be noticed during preschool. Preschool teachers need to determine which kids are at risk of having specific learning disabilities so that they can be detected early and an intervention provided. Preschool teachers need to be aware of the early signs of specific learning disabilities to distinguish between typically developing children and those at risk of having specific learning disabilities. In this review, studies describing the preschool characteristics of students at risk of having specific learning disabilities are examined, and the early signs of specific learning disabilities and early intervention processes are described based on the literature. Research suggests that the signs of specific learning disabilities can be seen in early childhood. The need for preschool teachers and families to be sensitive to the characteristics of children at risk of specific learning disabilities in the context of early intervention is discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.20489/intjecse.722383

ISSN: 1943-023X

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Behavioral Effects of Outdoor Learning on Primary Students

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: Children have an innate sense of curiosity about nature. “When children come in contact with nature, they reveal their strength” (Montessori, 1967, pg. 69) and therefore, outdoor education can be a useful learning tool for students. Whether being outdoors or bringing the nature-based activities inside, children have the opportunity to work with all of their senses. A growing number of schools around the United States have begun adding outdoor learning to their curriculum (Lieberman & Hoody, 1998) to bring a positive outcome to students’ behavior. Outdoor learning provides another environment that children can thrive in and hopefully benefit from. As many students struggle with learning confined to an indoor learning environment, like most classrooms, changing the environment offers students a uniquely rich context to frame student learning and provides them with movement, stimulation and grabs their attention so they can focus better (Bjorge, Hannah, Rekstad and Pauly, 2017). “If students are more focused, it is less likely for them to cause disruptive behaviors” (Bjorge, et. al, p. 4). This positive change in behavior is beneficial for everyone including students, teachers, and parents. By incorporating outdoor learning regularly in a classroom, children are given the freedom to move and explore on a sensorial level that may promote positive learning abilities. Using the outdoor environment as a classroom setting can have an impact on children who are not successful in an indoor classroom setting. According to existing research, (Bjorge, et. al, 2017; James, J.K. and Williams, T., 2017; Lieberman & Hoody, 1998) student motivation and concentration behaviors, as well as overall well-being, can be greatly impacted and improved through outdoor learning opportunities.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

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