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170 results

Article

To Touch the Spirit of the Child: A Multicultural Perspective

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 23, no. 1

Pages: 122-138

Cultural pluralism, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Multicultural education, Multiculturalism, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals, Spirituality, Teacher-student relationships

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Abstract/Notes: Describes educational thinkers who pursue the intangibles in relation to children's education, and argues these intangibles are equally important as developing cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills. Enumerates the universal needs of the educational process as including dialog (good listening and observation), bonding, and a spiritual perspective on the human condition.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

A Montessori Multicultural Environment with Southeast Asian Refugee Children

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 12, no. 2

Pages: 13-23

Americas, Asia, Cultural pluralism, Displaced communities, North America, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals, Refugees, Southeast Asia, United States of America

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Book

Dall'idealismo alla biologia culturale: saggi di pedagogia e filosofia

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Language: Italian

Published: Roma, Italy: Cias, 1986

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Culturally Congruent Education and the Montessori Model: Perspectives from Hawaiian Culture-based Educators

Available from: American Montessori Society

Americas, Culturally responsive teaching, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate why some Hawaiian language and culturebased (HLCB) educators perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their goals and values and to determine the salient features of the Montessori approach used by HLCB teachers who received Montessori training. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 40 HLCB participants, including 15 key informants who had at least 180 hours of Montessori training. Data also included classroom and school visits and analyses of school documents. Data analysis revealed six themes and two linkages that related the themes and their elements. Four themes were related to why HLCB educators have perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their values and goals. These were (a) similar views regarding their work as a lifestyle, (b) common pedagogical practices, (c) shared values and beliefs as educators, and (d) an overlapping world-view. One theme described the distinctions between the approaches. The final theme included challenges to implementing and maintaining HLCB programs. The findings suggest that researchers and teacher educators interested in culturally congruent education should take into account the underlying world-view of both the research paradigm and the participants involved, and that school reform should be comprehensive, culturally congruent, and generated from within communities and other stakeholders. They also indicate that culturally congruent, place-based education may enhance academic self-efficacy and could serve as a bridge between seemingly disparate educational approaches.

Language: English

Published: Manoa, Hawaii, 2006

Master's Thesis (M.A. In Education)

How Montessori Educators in the US Address Culturally Responsive Teaching

Available from: American Montessori Society

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate how Montessori educators in a public school setting in California address the pluralistic nature of their students’ cultural, racial and linguistic backgrounds. The Montessori method of education has been an alternative approach to education used around the world for 100 years. In the U.S., teachers’ backgrounds are often culturally and linguistically different from those of their students. How aware of these differences are Montessori teachers as they use the materials, curriculum, and method of the Montessori approach to education? The participants were six Montessori elementary teachers from the same public school, including the researcher. The participants met weekly for one hour focus group meetings which were audio recorded and transcribed by the researcher. Other data included researcher’s field notes in the form of reflections written after focus group meetings. Data was analyzed for generative themes and are presented here framed in theory from the literature on critical pedagogy and the Montessori method of education.

Language: English

Published: San Francisco, California, 2007

Article

Il computer a scuola: una moda o un'esigenza culturale?

Available from: Atlante Montessori

Publication: Vita dell'Infanzia (Opera Nazionale Montessori), vol. 33, no. 11-12

Pages: 52-56

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0042-7241

Article

L'informatica e la tecnologia nello sviluppo culturale ed educativo della società

Available from: Atlante Montessori

Publication: Vita dell'Infanzia (Opera Nazionale Montessori), vol. 33, no. 11-12

Pages: 5-8

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0042-7241

Report

Ancona Montessori Research Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children. September 1, 1968 to August 31, 1969. Final Report

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Americas, Cognitive development, Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This paper, part of a long term study, reports the effect of a modified Montessori preschool experience on cognitive development, school-related behaviors, and social interactions and perceptions of disadvantaged children. Each of thirty-five disadvantaged Negro children (31 in nursery classes and 4 in elementary classes) was pair-matched with a middle class child. In the disadvantaged group, 17 children were attending nursery classes for the first time. Pre- and posttests were made of cognitive ability, on the Stanford-Binet, Piaget tests of length conservation, and sociometric features. Also, children were rated by testers on performance and by teachers rated classroom behaviors. Data from previous years on some of the children were used in reference to long term change. Part I (nursery school) test results show that neither first nor second-year children significantly increased their I.Q. scores. Both disadvantaged and middle class children scored similarly on task orientation. Middle class children showed more friendship choices forming across social-class lines. Part II (elementary school) results present limited support for the theory that children who continue in Montessori, rather than public, school will show better school achievement. Data included school records of more than 30 children. A future study will investigate diffusion effects on mothers and younger siblings, and testing with measures more directly relevant to Montessori curriculum. (NH)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., Aug 31, 1969

Article

Potenziale umano: il respiro culturale della proposta montessoriana

Publication: Nuove ipotesi: Quaderni di cultura pedagogica per la ricerca e l'aggiornamento (Università degli Studi di Palermo. Istituto di Pedagogia), vol. 7, no. 3

Pages: 311-317

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Language: Italian

Article

Introducing Cultural Subjects to Toddlers

Publication: Infants and Toddlers, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 5–8, 13–16

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Language: English

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