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873 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Real Thing: Preschoolers Prefer Actual Activities to Pretend Ones

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Developmental Science, vol. 21, no. 3

Pages: e12582

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Abstract/Notes: Pretend play is a quintessential activity of early childhood, and adults supply children with many toys to encourage it. Do young children actually prefer to pretend, or do they do it because they are unable to engage in some activities for real? Here we examined, for nine different activities, American middle-class preschoolers' preferences for pretend and real activities. The 100 children we tested (M = 58.5 months, range 36 to 82 months) overwhelmingly preferred real activities to pretend ones, and this preference increased from age 3 to age 4, then remained steady through age 6. Children provided cogent justifications for their preferences. The results are discussed with reference to other domains in which children show reality preferences and with respect to the content of preschool curricula.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/desc.12582

ISSN: 1467-7687

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

'The Coke side of life': An exploration of preschoolers' construction of product and selves through talk-in-interaction around Coca-Cola

Available from: Emerald Insight

Publication: Young Consumers, vol. 10, no. 4

Pages: 314-328

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Abstract/Notes: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to propose the activity‐based focus group as a useful method with which to generate talk‐in‐interaction among pre‐schoolers. Analytically, it aims to illustrate how transcribed talk‐in‐interaction can be subjected to a discourse analytic lens, to produce insights into how pre‐schoolers use “Coca‐Cola” as a conversational resource with which to build product‐related meanings and social selves. Design/methodology/approach Fourteen activity‐based discussion groups with pre‐schoolers aged between two and five years have been conducted in a number of settings including privately run Montessori schools and community based preschools in Dublin. The talk generated through these groups has been transcribed using the conventions of conversation analysis (CA). Passages of talk characterized by the topic of Coca‐Cola were isolated and a sub‐sample of these are analysed here using a CA‐informed discourse analytic approach. Findings A number of linguistic repertoires are drawn on, including health, permission and age. Coca‐Cola is constructed as something which is “bad” and has the potential to make one “mad”. It is an occasion‐based product permitted by parents for example as a treat, at the cinema or at McDonalds. It can be utilised to build “age‐based” social selves. “Big” boys or girls can drink Coca‐Cola but it is not suitable for “babies”. Originality/value This paper provides insight into the use of the activity‐based focus group as a data generation tool for use with pre‐schoolers. A discourse analytic approach to the interpretation of children's talk‐in‐interaction suggests that the preschool consumer is competent in accessing and employing a consumer artefact such as Coca‐Cola as a malleable resource with which to negotiate product meanings and social selves.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1108/17473610911007148

ISSN: 1747-3616

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Meditation, Rangoli, and Eating on the Floor: Practices from an Urban Preschool in Bangalore, India

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: YC - Young Children, vol. 65, no. 6

Pages: 48-55

Asia, India, South Asia

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Language: English

ISSN: 1538-6619

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Teachers Observe to Learn: Differences in Social Behavior of Toddlers and Preschoolers in Same-Age and Multiage Groupings

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: YC - Young Children, vol. 61, no. 3

Pages: 70-76

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Language: English

ISSN: 1538-6619

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Preschool Democracy - Ideas from Montessori

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: The Social Studies, vol. 75, no. 4

Pages: 178-181

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/00377996.1984.10114444

ISSN: 0037-7996, 2152-405X

Autodisciplina en niños de edad preescolar a través del método Montessori (4-7 años) [Self-discipline in preschool-age children through the Montessori method (4-7 years)]

Americas, Latin America and the Caribbean, South America, Venezuela

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Language: Spanish

Published: Caracas, Venezuela, 1983

The Choice and Use of Toys by Montessori Preschoolers: The Relation with Sex, Age, SES, and Conceptual Tempo

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Language: English

Published: West Lafayette, Indiana, 1972

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Exploring South African preschool teachers' roles and responsibilities with executive functions

Available from: AOSIS Publishing

Publication: South African Journal of Childhood Education, vol. 12, no. 1

Pages: Article 1141 (9 pages)

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Executive function, Montessori method of education, Preschool education, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: South African studies based on school readiness found that most children who commence formal schooling (from Grade 1) lack the basic skills needed to adapt within the learning environment – these include having challenges to follow instructions, work autonomously or focus on a task. The national guideline for teaching children between birth to 9 years does not specify how early childhood education programmes can facilitate or strengthen executive function (EF) skills through structured play. Structured play, can be understood as play activities that require guidance and instructions for completion. During the activities, the participants have to follow instructions in order to attain the outcome. Hence, there is a need to explore how EF skills can be developed through structured play. From our understanding, EF is an individual’s cognitive ability to regulate thoughts and actions needed to complete a task. Executive function skills assist learners to adjust and work effectively later (Grade 1) in a formal learning environment to perform academically. The study was conducted at preschool sites that follow different educational approaches. They are Montessori, National Curriculum Framework (NCF), Reggio Emilia and Independent Schools Association of Southern Africa (ISASA) preschools. The preschools are situated in affluent suburbs of Pretoria, Gauteng. In this article, learners refer to children aged 4 years in the Grade RRR class. A qualitative multiple case study design was utilised. We interacted with two teachers from four schools who followed different educational approaches. The data collection techniques included individual semi-structured interviews, lesson observation and document analysis, whilst photographs and field notes were taken when the teacher-participants interacted with learners during a planned learning experience. The generated data sets were inductively analysed and interpreted using the theoretical frameworks of sociocultural theory and metacognition. The interpreted data sets revealed that the preschool teacher-participants can facilitate EF using games, songs, movement exercises or racing competitions. The participants explained that indoor, outdoor and learning experiences facilitated EF skills such as self-regulation, working memory and cognitive flexibility during structured play. There is a need for preschool teachers to identify EF in the curriculum and know how to link and intentionally include the skills in daily learning experiences. This will ensure learners acquire EF and apply it in formal learning environments. The contribution to the body of scholarship is the development of guidelines for teachers to intentionally and explicitly develop EF skills using structured play. We confer that teachers play a role in enabling fun, engaging and hands-on activities that promote the acquisition of EF in the early years.

Language: English

DOI: 10.4102/sajce.v12i1.1141

ISSN: 2223-7682

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Potential for Using Visual Elicitation in Understanding Preschool Teachers' Beliefs of Appropriate Educational Practices

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: South African Journal of Education, vol. 32, no. 4

Pages: 393-405

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, East Africa, Kenya, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: We explore the use of video and photo elicitation in a research study undertaken to understand the way in which preschool teachers perceive and construct their provision of children’s educational experiences. We explore the value of visually elicited interviews based on video footage and photographs captured during teaching and learning in four classrooms in two preschool settings in Kenya. Through visually elicited interviews, both the teachers and the researcher constructed meaningful conversations (interviews) to explore preschool teachers’ practical experiences and their beliefs, understanding and interpretation of developmentally appropriate educational practices. This paper targets the possible value of and contribution made by visual data generation procedures, as well as their inherent challenges, in order to add to the body of knowledge on visually elicited interviews.

Language: English

DOI: 10.15700/saje.v32n4a661

ISSN: 2076-3433

Book

Montessori and Regular Preschools: A Comparison

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Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C.: National Institution of Education, 1984

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