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874 results

Article

Robotics in the Elementary and Preschool Classroom

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 27, no. 4

Pages: 12–17

Information and communications technology (ICT), Montessori method of education, Robotics in education, Technology and children

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Abstract/Notes: Part 3 of a series

Language: English

Article

Robotics in the Elementary and Preschool Classroom

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 27, no. 1

Pages: 26–33

Information and communications technology (ICT), Montessori method of education, Robotics in education, Technology and children

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Abstract/Notes: Part 1 of a series

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Embedding Video-Based Modeling Handwriting Instruction in a Montessori Preschool Phonics Program

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, and Early Intervention, vol. 7, no. 2

Pages: 151-160

Americas, Information and communications technology (ICT), Montessori method of education, North America, Technology and children, United States of America, Writing - Instruction and study

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Abstract/Notes: A video-based modeling handwriting program for lowercase letter formation was embedded in a Montessori preschool phonics curriculum in one of two Montessori classrooms for 16 weeks. Children could view the DVD on request during phonics lesson time. Phonics skill and letter sequencing patterns improved for the children in both classrooms. The children with access to viewing the video-based modeling showed greater improvement in letter legibility. As part of early intervening services, occupational therapy practitioners may be called upon to make recommendations that benefit all the children in a classroom. Video-based modeling was compatible with the Montessori phonics curriculum and effective for this group.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/19411243.2014.930618

ISSN: 1941-1243

Article

Zur Frage der schöpferischen Phantasie bei vorschulpflichtigen Kindern (Zusammenfassung eines Vortrages) [On the question of creative imagination in preschool children (summary of a lecture)]

Publication: Die Neue Erziehung, vol. 14

Pages: 678-679

Imagination in children, Montessori method of education, Preschool children, Preschool education

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Language: German

Article

Computers, Language Development, and Literacy and the Preschool Level

Publication: NAMTA Bulletin

Pages: 1-5

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

Article

A Comparison of Froebel and Montessori in Their Approaches for Preschool Mathematics / Froebel과 Montessori의 유아 수학교육론의 비교

Available from: RISS

Publication: 德成女大論文集 / Duksung Women's University Journal, vol. 8

Pages: 109-130

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Abstract/Notes: Froebel and Montessori are compared in their approaches for teaching preschool children the concept of number, numerical calculation, vulgar fraction and geometrical concepts. Froebel's approach is largely metaphysical whereas Montessori's is largely sensorial. But their approaches are not diametrically opposed to each other but rather cmoplementary to each other from the educational view point. Their different claims or views should be closely studied and objectively evaluated through various experiments, before any of them are seriously incorporated in our educational practices.

Language: Korean

Report

Preschoolers' Attitudes Toward Their Respective Early Childhood Programs

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of preschool children toward their program experiences and school adjustment, in order to ascertain whether differences existed among program type, age, and gender variables. A total of 90 preschool boys and girls 3 to 5 years of age from a church-related program, a Montessori program, and a Head Start program participated in the study. Children were surveyed using a self-report instrument, and teachers rated the children's adjustment to school environments. Results indicated that the attitudes toward program experiences of those children in the church-related program were different from those of children in the Montessori and Head Start programs. Results suggest that, in view of the increased emphasis on early childhood programs and the establishment of numerous preschool programs, such programs for young children should be evaluated from many points of view, including that of the preschool child.

Language: English

Published: [S.I.], 1986

Doctoral Dissertation

Formative Evaluation of a Bilingual Montessori Preschool Program

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Assessment, Bilingual education, Bilingualism, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation

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Abstract/Notes: This study describes and evalutes the first year of a bilingual Montessori early childhood program implemented at two sites in central Texas. In-depth descriptions are provided of two program components--oral language development and classroom management. Hypotheses related to changes in students' language proficiency and classroom behavior were tested, using the James Language Dominance Test to measure comprehension and production of Spanish and English, and the Coping Analysis Schedule for Educational Settings to assess changes in students' behavior. The description of the oral language development component of the program includes instructional activities for vocabulary enrichment, isolating the sounds of language, and clarifying the functions of words. Adaptations of the Montessori method for implementation in a bilingual setting are presented, along with the discussion of two unexpected findings--the inhibition of the use of Spanish by many Mexican American children, and the association of one language or the other with a particular set of materials. The description of the classroom management component of the program includes the preparation of the environment, observation and record-keeping practices, the basic techniques for presenting materials, and "grace and courtesy lessons." Maria Montessori's views on the nature of education, the role of the teacher, and the concept of discipline and behavior change are discussed and compared to more modern theorists. The results of the formative evaluation reveal that children made significant improvements in English and Spanish comprehension and production. Behavior changes observed included positive shifts in percentage of time spent in self-directed activity, in paying attention to the task at hand, and in positive social interaction. The results of the study are basically descriptive, since only the children in this program were tested and observed. The results indicate that the program goals for the first year were met, and point to a number of possible changes for program improvement, including the use of more Spanish, the recruitment of more Spanish-dominant students, the development of separate sets of materials for Spanish and English instruction, and the sharing by teachers of their particular classroom management strategies.

Language: English

Published: Austin, Texas, 1980

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Seeking Racial and Ethnic Parity in Preschool Outcomes: An Exploratory Study of Public Montessori Schools vs. Business-as-Usual Schools

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 16-36

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori pedagogy is a century-old, whole-school system increasingly used in the public sector. In the United States, public Montessori schools are typically Title I schools that mostly serve children of color. The present secondary, exploratory data analysis examined outcomes of 134 children who entered a lottery for admission to public Montessori schools in the northeastern United States at age 3; half were admitted and enrolled and the rest enrolled at other preschool programs. About half of the children were identified as White, and half were identified as African American, Hispanic, or multiracial. Children were tested in the fall when they enrolled and again in the subsequent three springs (i.e., through the kindergarten year) on a range of measures addressing academic outcomes, executive function, and social cognition. Although the Black, Hispanic, and multiracial group tended to score lower in the beginning of preschool in both conditions, by the end of preschool, the scores of Black, Hispanic, and multiracial students enrolled in Montessori schools were not different from the White children; by contrast, such students in the business-as-usual schools continued to perform less well than White children in academic achievement and social cognition. The study has important limitations that lead us to view these findings as exploratory, but taken together with other findings, the results suggest that Montessori education may create an environment that is more conducive to racial and ethnic parity than other school environments.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v9i1.19540

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori-Based Activities as a Transgenerational Interface for Persons With Dementia and Preschool Children

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, vol. 9, no. 4

Pages: 366-373

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori-based activities for persons with dementia have been used to successfully provide opportunities for programming between older adults and preschool children in shared site intergenerational care programs. Such intergenerational programming allows older adults with dementia to fulfill roles of teacher or mentor to younger children or as collaborative workmates for persons with more advanced dementia while providing children with positive one-on-one interactions with older adults. We review several studies using this approach; describe characteristics of the programs, participants, and results obtained; and provide recommendations for those interested in extending this line of work.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/15350770.2011.618374

ISSN: 1535-0770

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