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873 results

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

A Comparison Study: The Impacts of Montessori and Conventional Elementary Standards-Based Language Arts Curricula on Preschool Students’ Phonemic Awareness and Reading Readiness Skills

Available from: OhioLINK ETD Center

Comparative education, Curricula, Language acquisition - Phonetics, Preschool education, Reading

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Abstract/Notes: Preschools have become an important beginning step in education. This sequential mixed methods study sought to determine if the Montessori preschool setting provides greater academic achievement in reading readiness, specifically phonemic awareness, in preschoolers as compared to a conventional elementary standards-based preschool setting. Social constructivist theory and sociocultural theory were used as theoretical frameworks. Qualitative data was comprised of interviews with kindergarten teachers who agreed unanimously that preschool had a positive impact on students’ academic ability upon entrance to kindergarten. However, all four teachers had a negative connotation pertaining to Montessori students and the Montessori Method based solely on students’ behavior and students’ lack of conformity. For the quantitative data, multiple two sample t-tests were conducted to determine the effect of preschool experience on all 90 participants’ reading readiness scores upon entrance to kindergarten based upon DIBELS FSF and PSF and their KRA assessment scores, while taking socio-economic status into consideration. T-tests were used to compare the results from 30 Montessori students, 30 conventional standards-based elementary students, and 30 students with no preschool experience. All three sub-groups were matched equally based on socio-economic status. Montessori students outperformed the other two school groups on all three assessments. The difference in scores when separating Montessori students by socio-economic status is the most significant finding to come from this study. Montessori students considered low income had statistically lower scores on all three assessments when compared to Montessori students who are not considered low income.

Language: English

Published: Findlay, Ohio, 2019

Doctoral Dissertation

Executive Function, Social-Emotional Skills, and Academic Competence in Three Preschool Programmes: Pathways to School Readiness

Available from: British Library - EthOS

Academic achievement, Comparative education, Executive function, Preschool education, Social emotional learning

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Abstract/Notes: Research findings indicate that executive function (EF), social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence significantly promote children's school readiness and later success. School readiness broadly refers to a combination of skills necessary to function successfully in school and lack thereof may increase the risk of children's school problems. Therefore, it is essential for school systems to provide appropriate and timely support to the development of these fundamental skills. The present study focused on three particular preschool programmes: Montessori, Reggio Emilia, and the traditional play-based (British Columbia Early Learning Framework: BCEFL) programmes in Western Canada. Although they are popular, there is little empirical research that examines and compares the benefits of these programmes to the development of school readiness skills. As such, the present study aimed to 1) determine the effectiveness of these three preschool programmes in Western Canada on the development of children's school readiness; and 2) examine other sources of influences in the child, family and school in relation to the development of school readiness skills. Overall, 119 preschool children (48 Montessori, 42 Reggio Emilia, 29 BCELF) participated in the study. Observation was conducted once in the autumn of 2015 for each classroom using the CLASS observation tool. Teachers and parents of participating children filled in a series of questionnaires regarding the quality of their relationship with their child and their perceptions of daily EF and social-emotional skills of their child. The researcher also assessed individual children's fluid intelligence, EF, and pre-academic competence. The results showed that 1) although Montessori education appeared to be the most effective in facilitating numeracy skills, no curriculum stood out as notably more effective than any of the others at improving other areas of school readiness skills; 2) well-run classrooms where teachers were effective in time, behavioural, and attention management were most effective in promoting children's numeracy skills; 3) EF, social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence exhibited an overlapping developmental process over time; 4) relational quality in both home and school environments significantly affected the development of school readiness skills, especially social-emotional skills; and 5) adults' perceptions of children's EF and social-emotional skills had a significant consequence for how teachers and parents formed their relationships with their children.

Language: English

Published: Oxford, England, 2018

Article

Maktabgacha Ta'lim Yoshidagi Bolalarni Tarbiyalashda Mariya Montessori Metodikasidan Foydalanish / Use of Maria Montessori Methodology in Education of Preschool Children

Available from: Academic Research in Educational Sciences (ARES)

Publication: Academic Research in Educational Sciences, vol. 2, no. 4

Pages: 1231-1235

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Preschool education

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Abstract/Notes: This article discusses the use of the Maria Montessori method. The humanization of education and the discovery of human potential and the satisfaction of its diverse needs in education, the priority of national values, the harmonization of human society and the environment. Therefore, today a number of advanced methods are used to develop the pedagogy of preschool education. One of these is Maria Montessori technology. It is essentially a "natural" way of life and is known for its perfection in child rearing. "I think about the way we treat children," he said. / Ushbu maqolada Mariya Montessori metodikasidan foydalanish haqida so'z boradi. Ta’limning insonparvarlashuvi va inson qobiliyatlarining ochilishi hamda uning ta'limga nisbatan bo'lgan turli –tuman ehtiyojlari qondirilishi, milliy umumbashariy qadriyatlar ustuvorligining ta'minlanishi, inson jamiyat va atrof muhit o'zaro munosabatlarining uyg'unlashuvidir. Shu bois bugungi kunda maktabgacha ta'lim pedagogikasini rivojlantirish maqsadida bir qancha ilg'or usullar tatbiq etib kelinmoqda. Shulardan biri Mariya Montessori texnologiyasidir. Bu mohiyatan hayotdan o'zlashtirilgan ―tabiiy‖ usul bo'lib, bola tarbiyasida o'zining har tomonlama mukammaligi bilan ommalashgan. ―Bizning bolalarga bo'lgan munosabatimizni o'ylar ekanman –deydi.

Language: Uzbek

DOI: 10.24411/2181-1385-2021-00723

ISSN: 2181-1385

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D. In Communications)

Television as Activity System: "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood" and the Development of Polite Behavior Routines in Preschoolers

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This dissertation examines the role of quality age-appropriate television in children's knowledge of polite behavior routines. The television program used is from the series "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood" and the child subjects are preschoolers in a Montessori school in a midwestern University town. The study asks: What do preschoolers know about appropriate host-guest behaviors and from where does this knowledge come? A developmental investigation of preschoolers' knowledge of polite behavior routines and their learning from the television program is undertaken using the theoretical framework of Soviet activity theory. By framing the interacting elements in the study as an activity system, a study design in five phases emerges. The phases include: observations of children in the classroom environment; a deep reading of the program; interviews with the program's producers; a study of children's learning from the program and knowledge of host-guest behaviors, and; surveys and interviews with parents intended to establish family attitudes and methods for teaching polite behaviors. Results from the five phases are integrated and analyzed within the framework of activity theory. It is concluded that preschoolers have quite a bit of knowledge about how to interact as hosts and guests and that they do imitate and learn from an appropriate television program. Their knowledge of appropriate behaviors and their memory and comprehension for the televised messages increase with age from three to five years. There also appears to be an affective component, involving fear related to strange situations, at work for the youngest children, which may contribute to inhibiting their performance of appropriate behaviors. The television program, the school, and the home, which in this study all reflect middle-class American values, parallel each other in the behaviors they encourage. And although the importance of this kind of television programming is acknowledged, it is concluded that children's abilities in this domain are stretched more by interacting with an adult, that is, learning takes place in the "zone of proximal development" in a role-playing situation, but not simply as a result of viewing.

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 1993

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

A Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Montessori Education on Five Fields of Development and Learning in Preschool and School-Age Children

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Contemporary Educational Psychology, vol. 73

Pages: Article 102182

Child development, Children, Elementary school students, Learning, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Preschool children

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Abstract/Notes: This meta-analysis examines the effects of Montessori Education (ME) on five dimensions of development and learning in preschool and school-age children. It includes data from 33 experimental or quasi-experimental studies comparing ME with other pedagogical approaches (268 effect sizes; n = 21,67). These studies were conducted in North-America, Asia and Europe, and published between 1991 and 2021. Effect size estimated using Hedges’ unbiased g, and a 3-level multilevel meta-analytic approach applied due to the dependency among the effect sizes obtained from the same study. Results showed that ME’s effects on development and learning are positive and vary from moderate to high, depending on the dimension considered: cognitive abilities (g = 0.17), social skills (g = 0.22), creativity (g = 0.25), motor skills (g = 0.27), and academic achievement (g = 1.10). Analyses of different moderators did not reveal differences by school level, type of publication and continent.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.cedpsych.2023.102182

ISSN: 0361-476X

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

A Comparison of Social and Cognitive Development in British Infant and Montessori Preschools

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Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1977

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Analysis of Three Programs for Preschool Disadvantaged Children

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Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, 1968

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

A Comparison of Cognitive and Social Development in British Infant and Montessori Preschools

Cognition, Comparative education, England, Europe, Great Britain, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Northern Europe, Social development, United Kingdom

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Abstract/Notes: British Infant vs Montessori preschool programs, logical structure & number comprehension & cognitive development & social interaction, male vs female, 3 vs 4 yr olds

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1977

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Links Between Screen Time, Montessori Preschool Exposure, and Working Memory

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Cognitive development, Information and communications technology (ICT), Montessori method of education, Technology and children, Working memory

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Abstract/Notes: A high-quality, foundational education offers lifelong benefits for young children. The problem is that working memory in pre-school-aged children is declining and could be impaired by the extraneous cognitive load imposed during engagement with screen media apps and/or preschool programs. Although the pedagogical practices associated with Montessori preschool programs have been found supportive of cognitive load germane to learning and improved working memory, they have not been fully considered in relation to preschoolers' screen media use. The cognitive load created by screen media apps could affect their usefulness as learning tools. The purpose of this quantitative study was to discover any links between preschoolers’ working memory function; passive, active and/or total screen time; and Montessori preschool program exposure. The study was conducted through the lenses of the executive function construct and cognitive load theory. Data on children’s working memory and screen time were collected from a convenience sample of 60 parents: 30 Montessori, and 30 non-Montessori. Parents completed a one-time administration of BRIEF-P and Screen Time Questionnaires on behalf of their child. Findings from multiple regression analysis indicated no link between Montessori preschool exposure or parent-controlled total, passive, or active screen time; and young children’s working memory, although a significant inverse relationship was found between active screen time and Montessori exposure. The results could inform virtual and hands-on pedagogical protocols that support working memory and improve pre-school-aged children’s learning and preparation for life. Each incidence of successful learning for a precious young child is a positive social change.

Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2022

Article

Robotics in the Elementary and Preschool Classroom

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 27, no. 2

Pages: 30–34

Classroom environments, Elementary education, Elementary schools, Information and communications technology (ICT), Montessori method of education, Preschool education, Robotics in education, Technology and children

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Abstract/Notes: Part 2 of a series

Language: English

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