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99 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

A Systematic Review of Montessori-Based Activities for Persons With Dementia

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, vol. 17, no. 2

Pages: 117-122

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori-based activities are becoming a popular approach for the care of older adults living with dementia. The aim of this study was to systematically assess the quality of the research examining the benefits of Montessori-based activities for persons with dementia. Six peer-reviewed databases were systematically searched for all relevant articles published until April 2015. Included articles were peer-reviewed studies published in English that employed Montessori-based activities with persons with dementia. Methodological quality was assessed by 2 independent raters using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale or the Downs and Black evaluation tool. Levels of evidence were assigned to the study design using a modified Sackett scale. One hundred fifty articles were identified, and 14 were selected for inclusion. Level-2 evidence examining the impact of Montessori-based activities on eating behaviors suggested that difficulties with eating could be reduced with Montessori training. There was limited level-4 evidence for the benefits of Montessori-based activities on cognition, wherein benefits appeared to be specific to lower-level cognitive abilities including memory and attention. Finally, there is level-1 (n = 1), level-2 (n = 3), and level-4 (n = 6) evidence for the benefits of Montessori-based activities on engagement and affect, whereby constructive engagement and positive affect were heightened. Overall, there is a strong level of evidence for the benefits of Montessori-based activities on eating behaviors and weak evidence for the benefits on cognition. Evidence for the benefits of Montessori-based activities on engagement and affect are mixed. Future research is needed to examine the long-term benefits of Montessori-based activities.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.jamda.2015.10.006

ISSN: 1525-8610

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori-Based Activities for Long-Term Care Residents with Advanced Dementia: Effects on Engagement and Affect

Available from: Oxford University Press

Publication: The Gerontologist, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 107-111

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Sixteen residents in long-term care with advanced dementia (14 women;average age = 88) showed significantly more constructive engagement(defined as motor or verbal behaviors in response to an activity), lesspassive engagement (defined as passively observing an activity), and morepleasure while participating in Montessori-based programming than inregularly scheduled activities programming. Principles of Montessori- basedprogramming, along with examples of such programming, are presented.Implications of the study and methods for expanding the use of Montessori-based dementia programming are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1093/geront/40.1.107

ISSN: 0016-9013

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Considering Olfactory Stimulation for Adults with Age-Related Dementia

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 88, no. 2

Pages: 398-400

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Behavioral interventions and activities for adults with age-related dementias sometimes use olfactory stimulation; however, limitations to the usefulness of such stimulation are suggested by both neurological studies which show a large amount of degeneration in the cells of the olfactory bulb and studies of perception which indicate that adults with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias perform poorly on tests of smell identification and detection. Current approaches to using olfactory stimulation as a component of interventions for adults with age-related dementia may need to be either abandoned or reassessed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.2466/pms.1999.88.2.398

ISSN: 1558-688X, 0031-5125

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP™): Use of a Small Group Reading Activity Run by Persons With Dementia in Adult Day Health Care and Long-Term Care Settings

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias, vol. 22, no. 1

Pages: 27-36

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Six persons in the early to middle stages of dementia (“leaders”) were trained in Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP™) to lead a reading activity fo...

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/1533317506297895

ISSN: 1082-5207, 2162-9986

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Approaches to engaging people with dementia in meaningful occupations in institutional settings: A scoping review

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 28, no. 5

Pages: 329-347

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Background People with dementia in institutional settings lack engagement in meaningful occupations, which may cause decreased quality of life. Although many researchers and professionals have proposed approaches to engage people with dementia in these occupations, an overview seems to be missing. Aim This scoping review provides an overview by categorizing and describing the characteristics of the approaches. Material and method A thorough literature search in nine databases identified the studies on approaches. We included 54 studies, and extracted bibliometric data. A content analysis revealed the characteristics of the approaches. Results Four categories of approaches were uncovered. First, the literature defined the concept of meaningful occupation in various ways. Second, a category of approaches provided theoretical knowledge of meaningful occupations. The third category focussed on specific themes, such as certain methods. The final described comprehensive multilevel approaches. Conclusion This review contributes to knowledge of the diversity of approaches to engage people with dementia in meaningful occupation within institutional settings. Significance We suggest that occupational therapy researchers and practitioners consider how the concept of meaningful occupation is embedded in the theoretical landscape. Furthermore, activity programming requires reflexive decision-making at the policy and practice level, as engagement in meaningful occupations is complex.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/11038128.2020.1791952

ISSN: 1103-8128

Article

The Montessori Method Applied to Dementia: An International Perspective

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 40-47

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: [...]clients planned and successfully executed a surprise birthday celebration for the center's manager. [...]after the visit, the inspectors asked to check medical records, as the residents did not seemed to have dementia. Residents who are in memory support and those who are minimally affected by dementia take part. Since the program's inception, students have been able to participate in research studies involving the creation of materials and activities to be used by persons with dementia, along with the assessment of their effects. [...]this hospital unit has been able to normalize these individuals and return them to their communities.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

An Intergenerational Program for Persons with Dementia Using Montessori Methods

Available from: Oxford University Press

Publication: The Gerontologist, vol. 37, no. 5

Pages: 688-692

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: An intergenerational program bringing together older adults with dementia and preschool children in one-on-one interactions is described. Montessori activities, which have strong ties to physical and occupational therapy, as well as to theories of developmental and cognitive psychology, are used as the context for these interactions. Our experience indicates that older adults with dementia can still serve as effective mentors and teachers to children in an appropriately structured setting.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1093/geront/37.5.688

ISSN: 0016-9013

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Embracing Montessori Methods in Dementia Care

Available from: Care Info

Publication: Journal of Dementia Care, vol. 12, no. 3

Pages: 24-26

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Tom and Karen Brenner describe their experience of using Montessori activities with people with dementia – and with intergenerational groups involving young people too.

Language: English

ISSN: 1351-8372

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Lead It!: An App to Enable Persons With Dementia to Lead Group Activities for Their Peers

Available from: Oxford Academic

Publication: Innovation in Aging, vol. 4, no. Supplement 1

Pages: 274-275

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: LEAD IT! is an app that enables persons with early and middle stage dementia to lead activities for their peers—i.e., other persons with dementia (PWD). An alpha version of the app was tested in a Phase 1 SBIR project. The alpha version included three Montessori-inspired activities. While PWD ostensibly view LEAD IT! as a set of enjoyable activities, it is actually an evidenced-based intervention aimed at reducing responsive behaviors and enabling PWD to fill meaningful social roles. A total of 24 PWD participated in the Phase 1 study: five leaders and 19 players. LEAD IT! Programming was implemented for six weeks, twice per week. LEAD IT! produced higher levels of positive engagement and affect, and lower levels of negative engagement, as compared to standard, baseline activities—i.e., non-digital activities led by staff. More specifically, when compared to baseline programming, players exhibited an 82% increase in Constructive Engagement (P=0.000), 80% increase in Passive Engagement (P=0.000), 60% reduction in Other Engagement (P=0.035), and 171% increase in Pleasure (P=0.000). One limitation of the Phase 1 study is that, at least insofar as the intervention is only implemented twice per week for six weeks, the positive outcomes seem to be limited to the period of time during which PWD are participating in the activity—i.e., changes on global measures, such as quality of life and depression were not detected. Still, the promising results of this study suggest that LEAD IT! is worthy of further development and evaluation in a planned Phase 2 study.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1093/geroni/igaa057.878

ISSN: 2399-5300

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effect of Intervention Guided by Montessori Method on Improving Feeding Capacity of Patients with Dementia

Available from: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine

Publication: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, vol. 13, no. 2

Pages: 1148-1155

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: This study was designed to analyze the effects of intervention guided by Montessori Method on patients with dementia. Methods: 85 patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in our hospital were included for retrospective analysis and were divided into 2 groups by double-blind randomized method. The control group (n=42) received routine guides on dieting, and the observation group (n=43) was intervened under the guides of Montessori Method. The 2 groups were compared for cognitive function, feeding capacity score, feeding difficulty, voluntary feeding time, and nutriture. Results: (1) After intervention, the observation group yielded a higher MMSE score for cognitive function than the control group (P<0.001); (2) The scores of feeding capacity in both groups achieved increase, which in the observation group was higher than that in the control group 1 month after intervention (P<0.001); (3) The scores of feeding difficulty in both groups achieved decrease, which in the observation group was lower than that in the control group after intervention (P<0.001); (4) For voluntary feeding time as intervention completed, 1 month and 3 months after intervention, the observation group reported prominent extension (P<0.001) while the control group achieved shortening gradually (P<0.001), and the voluntary feeding time in the observation group was longer than that in the control group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Intervention guided by Montessori Method helps patients with dementia by reducing their feeding difficulty and improving their cognitive function, feeding capacity, and nutriture. It is a method deserving popularization.

Language: English

ISSN: 1940-5901

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