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70 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

‘The Jigsaw Culture of Care’: A Qualitative Analysis of Montessori-Based Programming for Dementia Care in the United Kingdom

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Dementia, vol. 20, no. 8

Pages: 2876-2890

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, England, Europe, Gerontology, Great Britain, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Northern Europe, Northern Ireland

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori-Based Programming (MBP) in dementia care refers to a growing body of research and practice that has developed Montessori methods to facilitate self-paced learning, independence and engagement for people living with dementia. A number of research gaps have been identified in the existing literature such as a lack of cross-cultural studies and well-powered, robustly designed outcome studies. The current study investigated the use of MBP with a focus on provision in the United Kingdom. It aimed to identify MBP implementation approaches, challenges and barriers, and research gaps.Design and MethodsA qualitative design was implemented to analyse data from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders (N = 8) with experience of MBP in the UK. Participants included care home management and staff, MBP trainers and independent dementia experts with a background in Montessori methods. Thematic analysis identified 4 main themes and 12 sub-themes. The study took place between April 2019 and October 2019.FindingsA framework describing knowledge and understanding of MBP in the UK, implementation considerations, challenges and barriers, evidence of outcomes and research gaps was developed to provide guidance for researchers and practitioners. Implementation considerations included using a whole-home approach and changing the culture of care through management support. Barriers to implementation included conservative attitudes to care, perceived lack of time and resources, health and safety issues, and issues of sustainability.ConclusionThe benefits of MBP in dementia care are promising but require further empirical investigation. There is a need to design, execute and publish evidence to secure the support of key stakeholders in dementia care research, policy and commissioning in the UK.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/14713012211020143

ISSN: 1741-2684, 1471-3012

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Positive Interactive Engagement (PIE): A Pilot Qualitative Case Study Evaluation of a Person-Centred Dementia Care Programme Based on Montessori Principles

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Dementia, vol. 19, no. 4

Pages: 975-991

Alzheimer's disease, Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI), Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Altered behaviour associated with dementia can present a number of challenges in the provision of care within both community and residential aged care settings. This paper presents a qualitative case study investigation of the implementation of the Positive Interactive Engagement programme within a residential aged care setting. The Positive Interactive Engagement programme incorporates non-pharmacological sensory techniques that have been informed by a person-centred, Montessori approach. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews with workers at a residential aged care facility in South Australia yielded seven case studies. Data were thematically analysed both within and between cases. Our data indicate the programme demonstrates underlying Montessori principles and supports participant behaviour change, with a noted reduction in ‘disruptive’ behaviours and increased social connection amongst participants. Programme staff report increased job satisfaction. The Positive Interactive Engagement programme offers a model that demonstrates encouraging outcomes, and further research would be useful in ascertaining whether these outcomes translate to quantifiable improvements in the quality of life for people with dementia in a residential aged care setting.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/1471301218792144

ISSN: 1741-2684, 1471-3012

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori-Based Activities Among Persons with Late-Stage Dementia: Evaluation of Mental and Behavioral Health Outcomes:

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Dementia, vol. 18, no. 4

Pages: 1373-1392

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Literature regarding Montessori-based activities with older adults with dementia is fairly common with early stages of dementia. Conversely, research on said activities with individuals experiencing late-stage dementia is limited because of logistical difficulties in sampling and data collection. Given the need to understand risks and benefits of treatments for individuals with late-stage dementia, specifically regarding their mental and behavioral health, this study sought to evaluate the effects of a Montessori-based activity program implemented in a long-term care facility. Utilizing an interrupted time series design, trained staff completed observation-based measures for 43 residents with late-stage dementia at three intervals over six months. Empirical measures assessed mental health (anxiety, psychological well-being, quality of life) and behavioral health (problem behaviors, social engagement, capacity for activities of daily living). Group differences were observed via repeated measures ANOVA and paired-samples t-tests. The aggregate, longitudinal results—from baseline to final data interval—for the psychological and behavioral health measures were as follows: problem behaviors diminished though not significantly; social engagement decreased significantly; capacities for activities of daily living decreased significantly; quality of life increased slightly but not significantly; anxiety decreased slightly but not significantly; and psychological well-being significantly decreased. Improvements observed for quality of life and problem behaviors may yield promise for Montessori-based activities and related health care practices. The rapid physiological and cognitive deterioration from late-stage dementia should be considered when interpreting these results.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/1471301217703242

ISSN: 1741-2684, 1471-3012

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Assessment of Capabilities in Persons with Advanced Stage of Dementia: Validation of the Montessori Assessment System (MAS):

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Dementia, vol. 18, no. 5

Pages: 1840-1857

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: This study evaluated the validity and reliability of the Montessori Assessment System. The Montessori Assessment System assesses preserved abilities in persons ...

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/1471301217729533

ISSN: 1741-2684, 1471-3012

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effect of Montessori Method on the Cognitive and Behavioral Intervention of Senile Dementia Patients: A Meta-Analysis

Available from: Talent of Magical Research

Publication: Aging Communications, vol. 4, no. 2

Pages: 7

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Background: To evaluate the effect of Montessori method on cognitive and behavioral function in patients with senile dementia by meta-analysis. Methods: The randomized controlled trials of the effect of Montessori method on cognitive and behavioral functions of Alzheimer’s patients in PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Excerpt Medica Database, The Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Weipu Information Chinese Periodical Service Platform database and Wanfang database were searched by computer, and the references of relevant literatures were traced. Two researchers independently conducted literature screening, data extraction, evaluation and inclusion in the literature, using RevMan 5.4.1 software for meta-analysis. Results: A total of 11 literatures were included and 936 patients were enrolled. Meta analysis shows that compared with routine nursing, Montessori method is helpful to improve the overall cognitive function (standardized mean difference = 1.53, 95% confidence interval (1.32, 1.73), P < 0.01), activities of daily living and reduce the incidence of adverse events (relative risk = 0.37, 95% confidence interval (0.21, 0.63), P < 0.01) in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Conclusion: Montessori method is helpful to improve the overall cognitive function, activities of daily living and reduce the incidence of adverse events in patients with senile dementia. Affected by the included study, it still needs to be confirmed by multi center and large sample randomized controlled study.

Language: English

DOI: 10.53388/AGING202204007

ISSN: 2815-7168

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Person-Centered Memory Care Through Montessori for Dementia and Ageing: A Quality Improvement Study

Available from: Healio

Publication: Journal of Gerontological Nursing, vol. 48, no. 8

Pages: 6-9

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori for Dementia and Ageing (MDA) is a philosophy to support person-centered care (PCC) and autonomy of older adults. This quality improvement project documented outcomes of implementation of the MDA philosophy in a long-term care memory neighborhood. After an initial training session, MDA was implemented with weekly, 2-hour on-site coaching sessions over the course of two semesters (28 weeks) with a community of 20 female persons living with dementia (PWD). Primary outcomes were negative responsive behaviors of PWD, whereas the secondary outcome included percentage of active engagement of PWD. Mean number of negative responsive behaviors was 62.21 at baseline, which decreased to 33.82 at the end of the project per the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory. At baseline, PWD were actively engaged in 18.15% of observed opportunities, according to the Engage portion of the Resident-Centered Assessment of Interactions with Staff and Engagement Tool. At the end of the project, PWD were actively engaged in 40.56% of observed opportunities. Results suggest that MDA is feasible to implement PCC in a long-term care memory neighborhood. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 48(8), 6–9.]

Language: English

DOI: 10.3928/00989134-20220629-02

ISSN: 1938-243X, 0098-9134

Article

Book Review: You Say Goodbye and We Say Hello, Montessori Method for Dementia Care

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 25, no. 3

Pages: 10

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

From Efficacy to Effectiveness to Diffusion: Making the Transitions in Dementia Intervention Research

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, vol. 11, no. 3/4

Pages: 495-517

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Translating research outcomes into clinical application in neuropsychological rehabilitation is seen as requiring two critical transitions. The first is a transition in research outcome emphasis from efficacy (demonstrating that an intervention works under controlled conditions) to effectiveness (demonstrating that an intervention works as implemented in real-world contexts). The second is a transition in which effective interventions are required to be diffused within caregiving systems to enable them to be implemented on a large scale. Examples of these transitions are provided within the context of designing interventions for persons with dementia.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/09602010042000079

ISSN: 0960-2011

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Approaches to engaging people with dementia in meaningful occupations in institutional settings: A scoping review

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 28, no. 5

Pages: 329-347

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Background People with dementia in institutional settings lack engagement in meaningful occupations, which may cause decreased quality of life. Although many researchers and professionals have proposed approaches to engage people with dementia in these occupations, an overview seems to be missing. Aim This scoping review provides an overview by categorizing and describing the characteristics of the approaches. Material and method A thorough literature search in nine databases identified the studies on approaches. We included 54 studies, and extracted bibliometric data. A content analysis revealed the characteristics of the approaches. Results Four categories of approaches were uncovered. First, the literature defined the concept of meaningful occupation in various ways. Second, a category of approaches provided theoretical knowledge of meaningful occupations. The third category focussed on specific themes, such as certain methods. The final described comprehensive multilevel approaches. Conclusion This review contributes to knowledge of the diversity of approaches to engage people with dementia in meaningful occupation within institutional settings. Significance We suggest that occupational therapy researchers and practitioners consider how the concept of meaningful occupation is embedded in the theoretical landscape. Furthermore, activity programming requires reflexive decision-making at the policy and practice level, as engagement in meaningful occupations is complex.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/11038128.2020.1791952

ISSN: 1103-8128

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori-Based Activities for Long-Term Care Residents with Advanced Dementia: Effects on Engagement and Affect

Available from: Oxford University Press

Publication: The Gerontologist, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 107-111

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Sixteen residents in long-term care with advanced dementia (14 women;average age = 88) showed significantly more constructive engagement(defined as motor or verbal behaviors in response to an activity), lesspassive engagement (defined as passively observing an activity), and morepleasure while participating in Montessori-based programming than inregularly scheduled activities programming. Principles of Montessori- basedprogramming, along with examples of such programming, are presented.Implications of the study and methods for expanding the use of Montessori-based dementia programming are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1093/geront/40.1.107

ISSN: 0016-9013

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