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518 results

Article

What Makes a Good School - and How to Get One: Beware of Gimmicky Innovations; the Essential Ingredient in Good Schooling Is Good Teaching, and That's Where Our Efforts and Our Money Should Go

Available from: ProQuest - Women's Magazine Archive

Publication: Parents' Magazine and Better Family Living, vol. 47, no. 1

Pages: 44-45, 82

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Language: English

ISSN: 0031-191X

Article

Book Reviews: Teaching Disadvantaged Children in the Preschool by Carl Berelter and Siegfried Engelmann; Fun with Cooking, New Revised Edition, by Mae Blacker Freeman

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1965-1973), vol. 3, no. 1

Pages: 46-48

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Book

Standard Operating Procedure for a Montessori School: A Guideline for Operating Montessori Schools

Americas, Classroom environments, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Prepared environment, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: New York, New York: American Montessori Society, 1971

Edition: 5th ed.

Article

Why Become an AMI Recognized School?

Publication: AMI Elementary Alumni Association Newsletter, vol. 31, no. 2

Pages: 9–10

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Language: English

Article

A Montessori High School for Sydney

Publication: Montessori Matters

Pages: 2

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, High schools, Montessori schools, Oceania

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Language: English

Article

Uit de School

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Montessori Opvoeding, vol. 22, no. 1

Pages: 5

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Language: Dutch

Doctoral Dissertation

Examining Montessori Middle School Through a Self-Determination Theory Lens: A Mixed Methods Study of the Lived Experiences of Adolescents

Available from: University of California eScholarship

Self-determination, Self-determination theory

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori education was developed over a century ago. Dr. Montessori and her followers designed learning environments to meet the academic, social and psychological needs of students from eighteen months to eighteen years old. Within her writings and books, Dr. Montessori described strategies and structures that support autonomy, competence and relatedness. These same supports are found within Self-determination Theory (SDT) literature. Research points towards a link between satisfaction of the basic needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness and increased resilience, goal achievement, and feelings of well-being. . This study examined the influence of enrollment on the development of self- determination in a Montessori middle school which is intentionally created to support the development of autonomy, competence, and relatedness on adolescents. Bounded by self-determination, critical, and student voice theory, this research was designed to give voice to the most important stakeholders in education, add to the discourse on middle school reform, and provide the perspective of the student to the critique of middle level education. Based on the analysis of narrative, the major themes which represented all participants in all cycles were indicators of the importance of autonomy and relatedness. Two themes, "choose type of work", "choose order of tasks" illustrate the importance of autonomy to this group of students. The last major theme, "help me stay on top of things" highlighted the importance of relatedness to the study group. From these themes implications for middle level educators, educational leaders and future researchers were developed. Participants in the study voiced strong opinions about practices which supported autonomy and relatedness. Students valued the ability to choose the order of their tasks and the tasks they could choose to demonstrate understanding as well as the ability to re-take tests. These changes require a paradigm shift to a student- centered learning environment. Educational leaders can support this shift through providing staff development and planning time. Future research suggested by this study include studies which could further examine a possible link between relatedness support and student achievement and studies designed to capture the voices of students with a low measured SDT

Language: English

Published: San Diego, California, 2013

Article

Book Reviews: Teaching as a Subversive Activity [by] Neil Postman and Charles Weingartner; The Way it Spozed to Be [by] James Herndon; The Underachieving School [by] John Holt

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1965-1973), vol. 5, no. 4

Pages: 31

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Conference Paper

Integrating Infants into Preschool Education

Available from: Beder University College (Albania)

International Conference on Innovation in Business and Technology (ICIBT, June 10, 2022)

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Abstract/Notes: For many years in our kindergartens classical teacher-centered teaching has been applied. In this article we will try to study and shed light on: Was it the best method? Has this method helped the child's independence, self-realization or self-development? What about the psycho-emotional realms? It has been observed in many years of work in the preschool system, that classical methods have not properly helped the child's self-development and his achievements. The Montessori method has been applied around the world for years, "Help me do it myself" .... At its core lies the child's freedom in carrying out any activity from clothing - unclothing to scientific research. The teacher is the observer and the child chooses to perform a game or other activity based on his or her preferences or emotional state. It has been seen that the Montessori method has had a very positive impact on the development of the child. Individual work and interest are made possible thanks to educational tools created in a group that is heterogeneous in age and experience. Psychologically it is important that in a different age group there is no reason to compare. By applying Maria Montessori's method in life, adults need to understand what interests the baby, create the conditions for fuller development, and explain how the little one can learn more. But it remains to be seen how much can be achieved, how many teachers with years and years of experience can come out of their frameworks, and in addition, kindergarten education should not be limited to its walls, but requires continuing at home and a close parent-teacher collaboration.

Language: English

Published: Tirana, Albania: Bedër Press, 2022

Pages: 216-232

ISBN: 978-9928-4590-9-1

Article

Schoolcorrespondentie

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Montessori Opvoeding, vol. 13, no. 11

Pages: 86

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Language: Dutch

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