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917 results

Article

I Hear American Singing – Folk Songs for American Families

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 27, no. 3

Pages: 7

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Abstract/Notes: Review

Language: English

Article

Indigenous American Montessori Models: An American Montessori Elementary Teacher

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 16–18

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, North America, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

American Know How: Educational Reformers Around the World Looking to the American Montessori Model

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 6, no. 3

Pages: 1

Public Montessori

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Language: English

Article

Bringing Montessori to the Black Community: A Private School Model

Publication: NAMTA Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 13-17

African American community, African Americans, Americas, North America, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Article

An Overview of the Bachman Lake Community School

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 2

Pages: 113-120

Americas, Bachman Lake Community School, Early childhood education, Lumin Education - History, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Tom Loew says that East Dallas Community Schools have been creating beautiful and functional environments for decades, but developing Bachman Lake Community School was more than creating a school. They also had to establish a community center, scale up staff quickly, service a wide number of families, leverage Montessori training and related costs, and ensure a Montessori approach. Most families at Bachman Lake are below the poverty line, very young, few are native speakers, and some are without immigration status. A mental health component is critical, home visits are frequent, professional intervention happens in homes, parents engage in "reflective service" utilizing licensed counselors, and the school encourages father participation. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Montessori from Birth to Six: In Search of Community Values," Minneapolis, MN, November 7-10, 2013.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Movement and the African Child: A Practice Going Astray

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences, vol. 14

Pages: 41-50

Africa, ⚠️ Invalid DOI

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Abstract/Notes: Movement is life and the power for growth and development for healthy lifestyle. Poor motion or inactivity is the basis for poor development in children and morbidity and mortality in adulthood. As children grow, it is expected that certain developmental dimensions such as physical, socio-emotional and cognitive will develop. These dimensions form a very important aspect of the human life and need to be nurtured to develop appropriately. One of the means through which these dimensions could be nurtured is through body movement involving locomotive and non-locomotive motions. For proper development children need to be taken through conscious steps that will help their all-round development which primarily has been part of African communal settings for cultural integration and development. Era of technology has brought several challenges facing the active lifestyle of African Children thereby predisposing them to sedentary living and its disease risks. Some of these include mass movement from rural setting to urban settlements, use of technology and also social media, fear of the environment and security issues amongst others. There is the need to appraise the cultural effect of technology on active lifestyle of African children and reactivate a balance between technology and re-integration of cultural mediums of training and development in children’s education. To promote adequate physical movement among children, curriculum should integrate healthy cultural/physical activities in the school, and parent should encourage their children to do domestic activities and reduce the use of electronic gadgets such as electronic games, TV and labour saving devices.

Language: English

DOI: 10.4314/ajesms.v14i0

ISSN: 2508-1128

Doctoral Dissertation

Education as a Tool for Social Change: Case Study of an Arizona Inner-City Charter School

Available from: University of San Francisco

Social transformation

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Abstract/Notes: It is a very difficult task to provide adequate education in the United States for children living in an inner-city environment, with problems of poverty, minority status, drugs, crime, gangs, suicide, despair, and many single-parent households. This is a Case Study of how one Arizona inner-city poverty community has risen to answer these educational demands for its children through a Montessori theory-based Charter Pre-12 school. The 650 student population served in this school is approximately 80% Hispanic American, 12% African American, and 8% Native, Asian and European American. Data were gathered from extensive interviews, observations, and document analysis. They were analyzed and evaluated in three ways: first, according to a literature review of the educational theories of Maria Montessori, then according to those of Paulo Freire, and lastly, according to a review of Charter school books, articles, and government documents available up to January of 2000. The results were an in-depth description of first, the history of this community's needs, its struggle to establish and fund the school, then the resulting educational program which it developed and implemented, and lastly, the community's positive evaluation of it's efforts. The curriculum described had extensive use of ESL and cultural appreciation programs, hands-on student initiated and student-implemented programs, integrated curriculum and critical thinking programs, job-skills related programs, self-esteem and character development programs, and Sustainable Systems Ecology Education demonstration programs. All these findings were presented in a manner which could be useful to other Administrators, who might desire to use this school's example to begin or to improve their own programs for a similarly disadvantaged inner-city population. Conclusions were that after five years of operation, this community empowerment school has indeed found methods, curriculum and programs that have successfully helped to meet the emotional, cultural, moral, and educational needs of the children in this particular poverty community. Conclusions were also that this community's experiences are valuable and appropriate for examination by other prospective Charter school Administrators from similar communities.

Language: English

Published: San Francisco, California, 2000

Article

Community: A Hallmark of Our Approach

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 1

Pages: 7-23

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: All the basics of the Montessori prepared environment are put into an extraordinary context of community and nurturing through personal encounter. The article emphasizes the longitudinal impact of an intentional community that results in character and concentration and looks to the spiritual attributes of the child in relation to the tangible parts of the prepared environment. Connie Black advises us that spiritual development entails appropriate love, respect, security, and generosity. Correlating achievement with the teacher's understanding of community and the prepared environment, the harmony of the Children's House is the point of origin for social and moral development. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "The Montessori Oasis: Prepared Pathways for a Sustainable School Community," Columbia, MD, October 3-6, 2013.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Community-Building in a Diverse Setting

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 36, no. 4

Pages: 291

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Abstract/Notes: Research demonstrates that community-building in schools is an integral aspect of student success. Based on a foundation of research findings related to the importance of implementing community-building into all aspects of a school, community-building activities, including five specific classroom strategies (parent visits class to tell about child, weekly newsletter with interactive activities, bi-monthly open-house hour where children explain school work to parents, Valentine letters filled with true compliments, and a cultural celebration unit focused on Africa), were implemented in an urban magnet school. This school was moving toward racial integration as well as implementation of a Montessori education program. As predicted from research information, incorporating community-building strategies geared at creating a welcoming climate, at improving faculty interaction, at fostering collaborative classrooms, and towards on-going and open teacher/parent communication and collaboration resulted in positive outcomes in what could have otherwise been a difficult, negative or unproductive situation.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s10643-008-0290-z

ISSN: 1082-3301, 1573-1707

Article

Americans Are Given Praise By Educator

Available from: California Digital Newspaper Collection

Publication: Los Angeles Herald (Los Angeles, California)

Pages: 1

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "AMERICANS ARE GIVEN PRAISE Of EDUCATOR. With the intention of establishing four great Montessori schools in California, Dr. Maria Montessori, founder of the educational system that bears her name and world famous for her intellectual achievements, today declared that Americans are more fitted for the work of advancing educational work than any other people. Dr. Montessori is established at the Maryland hotel, Pasadena, where she will make her headquarters during her visit here. One of her schools will be in Pasadena, one in Los Angeles, one in San Diego and the other in San Francisco, and all who attend to learn the famous Montessori technique will be sent from one to the other institution, to avoid routine and bo,t ways. AMERICANS PRAISED "Americans seem more interested In their young than do people of other countries, ’ Madame Montessori declared, through her interpreter, "and they are also more alert. It Is for these reasons that they embrace and develope more quickly what Is for the child's benefit. "My system Is still too new to show positive results," she continued, “but It Is founded on the desire to secure the same Justice for the child that the adult would have, and to d&relop only what Is good In child nature. CHILD BORN GOOD "A child Is born Into the world good. What it develops of wrong doing Is taught It by adults. If left to follow Its original instincts and desires it would be and do only good. 'By encouraging a child to know the Joy of right doing It will never want to do wrong. If a child's parents and teachers never give It wrong precepts It will not be guilty of wrong doing, for the Innocence of child nature is Ignorant of evil till that Is taught from the outside.'"

Language: English

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