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Book Section

Einige Hinweise zur Montessori-Literatur [Some references to the Montessori literature]

Book Title: Die Montessori-Pädagogik und das behinderte Kind: Referate und Ergebnisse des 18. Internationalen Montessori Kongresses (München, 4-8 Juli 1977) [Montessori Pedagogy and the Handicapped Child: Papers and Results of the 18th International Montessori Congress (Munich, July 4-8, 1977)]

Pages: 199-215

Conferences, International Montessori Congress (18th, Munich, Germany, 4-8 July 1977), Montessori method of education - Research

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Language: German

Published: München: Kindler, 1978

ISBN: 3-463-00716-9

Article

The Montessori Erdkinder: Three Abstracts [Montessori de Terra Linda, San Rafael, CA; Hershey Montessori School, Concord Township, OH; Lake Country School, Minneapolis, MN]

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 18, no. 1

Pages: 172–182

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Describes three projects: (1) the Laufenburg Ranch Project, a historical organic farm and agricultural and environmental education center; (2) the Hershey Montessori School's efforts to teach adolescents about the earth; and (3) the Lake Country School, which developed a farm campus and nature center as an integral part of its educational program.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis

Breaking the Circle of One: Reflection in Montessori Early Childhood Centres in Aotearoa New Zealand

Available from: Victoria University of Wellington - Research Archive

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori schools, New Zealand, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Little is currently known about how teachers in New Zealand Montessori early childhood centres reflect on Montessori philosophy and practice individually and collaboratively within teaching teams. The purpose of this research was to discover the current views about reflection on Montessori philosophy, the barriers teachers faced in reflecting and opportunities they identified for reflection. The impact that requirements for self review and teacher reflection have had on the approach taken to reflection, inquiry and professional learning by teachers in Montessori early childhood centres was also investigated. This research study used a mixed method case study and data was collected from teachers working in Montessori early childhood centres through semistructured interviews with three groups and an online survey of individual teachers. Participants placed high importance on reflection. However some participants were reluctant to critique Montessori philosophy; either because they viewed it as ‘valid’ or because they were concerned about being regarded as ‘heretical’ by other teachers. Participants felt safe raising questions within their teaching teams, but were more wary of debating and questioning philosophical issues with teachers in the wider Montessori community. Others regarded reflection as an opportunity to develop a shared understanding of Montessori philosophy and practice in their early childhood centre. Despite the participants’ perception that their team spent time reflecting on Montessori philosophy and relating this to daily teaching practice, it was still a challenge to make these reflective activities a priority in limited centre team meeting times. In addition, it appears that more support is needed to improve skills and knowledge about how the cyclical process of review or inquiry can engage with Montessori philosophy, inform centre philosophy, drive centre practice and improve outcomes for children. This study suggests that teachers would benefit from the creation of ‘safe spaces’ where they can engage with colleagues from their own or other Montessori early childhood centres in debate and discussion so that teaching practice becomes based on critical engagement with the underlying theoretical or philosophical principles of Montessori education.

Language: English

Published: Wellington, New Zealand, 2014

Article

That's Not Montessori

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 21, no. 3

Pages: 24-25

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The author could not contain herself one day at school recently when a parent of three children shared something she had heard from her eldest daughter. That morning, the eldest daughter was grumbling about the fact that she and her Lower Elementary brother had to go to school while her Preschool brother did not, and she announced to her mother, "That's not Montessori!." It got the author to think about the statement "That's not Montessori," a phrase she heard quite often in her first years as head of a Montessori school. Not having been trained as a Montessori teacher, she was at the mercy of teachers, parents, and trustees as to what was and what was not Montessori. She began to reflect on what "That's not Montessori" means. What is or is not Montessori is certainly open to individual interpretation and can be construed to make a particular point, but, undeniably, Montessori is about children. After reading about Dr. Montessori's philosophy, working with so many dedicated Montessori teachers, attending American Montessori Society (AMS) Annual Conferences, and chairing accreditation committees, the author has been immeasurably helped in her understanding that Montessori is about respecting the child and establishing an environment where the child can learn on his own, making decisions that affect his life and the lives of others.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Secondary Montessori Education in the Netherlands, Montessori Lyceum Amsterdam 1930

Publication: Communications: Journal of the Association Montessori Internationale (2009-2012), vol. 2011, no. 1-2

Pages: 156–161

Europe, Holland, Montessori Lyceum Amsterdam (Netherlands), Netherlands, Western Europe, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Lyceum of Amsterdam (MLA) is the oldest Montessori secondary school in the world. Although Maria Montessori had obviously started thinking about adolescent education long before its establishment in 1930, no other organization, or association of parents, had taken concrete steps towards the realization of an adolescent environment along Montessori principles. This account offers some interesting historical insights in how the Dutch communicated with Dr Montessori on the establishment of such a school.

Language: English

ISSN: 1877-539X

Article

Madame Montessori Coming

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: Venice Vanguard (Venice, California)

Pages: 3

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "Madame Montessori Coming- Los Angeles is to have the first demonstration, outside of Italy, of the world-famous Montessori system of teaching. May first, the great educator is coming and beach educators and those interested in child education are taking much interest in the event, which will be epoch making in its significance. Opinions differ largely as to the benefits to be derived from Madame Montessori's visit though all are loud in the praises of her methods as to the best way of reaching the child mind. Professori Cree T. Work of the Venice High School, call Madame Montessori's methods good and rational, the Venice educator has always felt in close sympathy with the plans that followed up the Froebel ideas, which take much the form of this Italian woman's system. "I think her visit here should be of great interest and help to us," said Mr. Work this morning, "we have a great number of her ideas working in our kindergartens at the present time, but she has combined them, and made them into splendid whole, that may be able to give us new ideas and new inspirations. Her ideas in the form of a system, will work wonders." Mrs. W. H. Anderson, president of the Venice Woman's Club, expressed herself as believing firmly in the Montessori system, which is an outgrowth of the article written years ago, by Radosavovich, head of the department of Pedagogy of the University of New York. These articles were published in German and admitted by the Italian teacher, as being of great help to her. "Madame Montessori is no doubt, the foremost educator of the day," said Mrs. Anderson, "I have known, from long study of my own children, that the child mind must be led through its impressions and not forced to accept its education. Their inclinations must lead to their development, in fact, the system is a Burbanking of the human mind, a grafting of impressions where and when they will best take root and develop." Mrs. Anderson speaks from experience, as she has carefully watched, step by step, the development of her own lovely daughters. Professor W. Y. Thornbury, principal of the Venice Grammar Schools, is not as enthusiastic about the Montessori system. Mr. Thornbury says, he has given some little time to the study of her system, and thinks she states a fallacy, when she says that a 3-year old child can do the same things that a child of 6 or 16 can accomplish. "The regular kindergarten work, as advocated by Froebel has all the time upheld the idea of the appeal to the senses of the child, and making him learn through self activity," said Mr. Thornbury, "and I don't think she has added anything to help us materially, I think her method embraces childhood at far to early an age; at 3 years old, the child should still be under guidance of a mother, instead of a teacher, and at the age of 4 and one-half years, when out kindergartens take them, I think our system can scarcely be added to, by that of the Italian teacher. We have tried to purchase part of the material used in her system, but can not do so without taking the whole, which, costs fifty dollars, and is well protected by a copyright." Miss Catherine Moore, who is conducting the arrangements for Dr. Montessori's coming, May 1, is receiving letters and telegrams from prominent educators all over the country. Many of them are coming. Mrs. Alexander Graham Bell, president of the Montessori Educational Association of Washington, D. C., has just written congratulating Los Angeles and offering cooperation. The association includes Philander P. Claxton, United States commissioner of Education; Miss Margaret Woodrow Wilson and many other members of Washington official circles. San Francisco wants the "Dottoressa," and so does San Diego. "President Francis, by his early recognition and understanding of her system, is to be credited for the coming of Dr. Montessori to Los Angeles first of any city outside of Italy," said Miss Moore. "The whole country is now interested." Classes will be held at the East Seventh street school, Saint Catherine's nonsectarian school and the Hotel Maryland, Pasadena. The children of Miss Moore's class at Saint Catherine's will be used for demonstrations every Saturday during the course. Dr. Montessori has accepted the invitation of the officials of the San Diego Exposition to visit the exposition in July, according to Mrs. Mary Paul-Jordon of 456 North Juanita street. Officials of the exposition received a cablegram from Dr. Montessori, who is still in Rome, late yesterday. This information was received by Dr. Jordon in a telegram from Duncan MacKinnon, superintendent of schools of the Southern city [San Diego], last night."

Language: English

Book Section

L'influenza di Maria Montessori sulla pedagogia tedesca [The influence of Maria Montessori on German pedagogy]

Book Title: Maria Montessori e il pensiero pedagogico contemporaneo [Maria Montessori and contemporary pedagogical thought]

Pages: 195-198

Conferences, Europe, Germany, International Montessori Congress (11th, Rome, Italy, 26-28 September 1957), Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: This speech was delivered on September 27, 1957 at the 11th International Montessori Congress (Rome, Italy).

Language: Italian

Published: Roma: Vita dell'infanzia, 1959

Book Section

The History of Methods: History of the Discovery of a Scientific Education for Normal Childre; Description of the Condiutions Surrounding the First Experiment - An Account of Its First Propagation

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 19-40

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Book Section

Adelia Pyle: From Montessori Disciple to Padre Pio Disciple

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: America's Early Montessorians: Anne George, Margaret Naumburg, Helen Parkhurst and Adelia Pyle

Pages: 185-216

Adelia Pyle - Biographic sources, Americas, Montessori method of education - History, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Unlike George, Parkhurst, and Naumburg, Adelia Pyle’s role in the early history of the Montessori movement came from discipleship rather than education. Trained as a directress in 1913, Pyle, the daughter of a wealthy New York family, became Montessori’s faithful aide and translator. From 1915 to 1919, the Pyle family was the principal financial contributor to the Montessori Promotion Fund founded by Maria Montessori. The fund purchased the American House of Childhood which manufactured and sold Montessori’s didactic materials. However, the Pyle family’s withdrawal of financial support, due to a conflict between Adelia’s mother, Adelaide McAlpin Pyle and Maria Montessori, had a devastating effect on the expansion of the Montessori Method in the United States. While living and traveling with Montessori, a Roman Catholic, Adelia, a Presbyterian, converted to Catholicism. In 1923, she met the famous Padre Pio, a charismatic Roman Catholic priest in Italy, who was acclaimed as bearing the stigmata, the wounds of the crucified Christ. Adelia Pyle, who seemed to seek the role of disciple, had found a new master. She transferred her allegiance from Montessori to Pio and was his disciple for forty-five years. She died on April 26, 1968 in San Giovanni Rotondo. There has been a movement to have her canonized as a saint of the Catholic Church.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020

ISBN: 978-3-030-54835-3

Series: Historical Studies in Education

Article

The Effectiviness of Montessori Education Method in the Acquisition of Concept of Geometrical Shapes

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Procedia: Social and Behavioral Sciences, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 1163-1166

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori metod is an education program which is comed about and developed spontaneously and intends to gives children an opportunity to be able to improve themselves and to have freedom of movement and activity in a prepaned environment. The materials planned specially for Montessori method are being used to acquire the concept of geometrical shapes. In this regard, the effectiveress of Montessori Education and the Minister of Education of preschool curriculum has been evaluated on the acquisition of geometrical shapes concepts to 4-5 year-old children in preschool. It has been concluded that the acquisition of geometrical shapes concept of children who received Montessori Education is much more successful than the children who received traditional education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.sbspro.2009.01.209

ISSN: 1877-0428

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