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518 results

Article

Foreign Language Immersion: Something New in Chicago [InterCultura Foreign Language Immersion School, Oak Park, Illinois]

Publication: El Boletin [Comité Hispano Montessori], no. 22

Pages: 1

Americas, Comité Hispano Montessori - Periodicals, Language acquisition, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Article

Experimenten met Natuurkunde op de Amstedamsche Lagere Montessori-School

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Montessori Opvoeding, vol. 11, no. 1

Pages: 1-2

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Language: Dutch

Book Section

Margaret Naumburg: Montessorian, Walden School, Progressive Educator

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: America's Early Montessorians: Anne George, Margaret Naumburg, Helen Parkhurst and Adelia Pyle

Pages: 217-263

Americas, Margaret Naumburg - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America, Walden School (New York City, 1914-1988)

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Abstract/Notes: After completing her training in 1913, Margaret Naumburg, in her lectures and articles, portrayed a highly emotional and romanticized image of Maria Montessori. Naumburg established several Montessori schools in New York City: at the Henry Street Settlement in 1913; at the Leete School from 1914 to 1916; and in the New York public school system in 1915. Stymied by bureaucracy and inadequate funding, she abandoned her public school experiment. Moving from Montessorian principles, Naumburg identified increasingly with child-centered Progressive education but added a dimension from Jung’s Analytic Psychology which emphasized children’s need to free their emotions through imaginative, creative self-expression through art. She founded her own “Children’s School” in 1916 in New York City, subsequently renamed the Walden School. She is also famous for developing dynamically oriented Art Therapy.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020

ISBN: 978-3-030-54835-3

Series: Historical Studies in Education

Article

School Registration

Publication: Montessori Quarterly, vol. 23

Pages: 19

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Language: English

Article

NZ School Features on International Magazine Cover [Children's House, Henderson, Auckland]

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 37

Pages: 4

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Language: English

Article

Guide to the Montessori Method: How This Unique Educational Approach Can Meet Your Top Priorities in the School Search

Available from: ISSUU

Publication: New York Family

Pages: 22-23

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

The Relationship Between Self-Concept and Stress of Elementary School Teachers Using Traditional and Montessori Methods of Teaching

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-concept and perceived levels of stress in the teaching profession at the elementary school level. The subjects of the study were teachers from two communities--Romulus, Michigan and Buffalo, New York. The subjects were chosen by the schools in which they taught and by the methods of teaching which they used. One-half of the total number of the subjects used traditional methods of teaching and one-half of the total number of the subjects used the Montessori Method of teaching. The responses of these teachers were gathered during the 1981 winter school term. The instruments used to gather the data for the study were the Tennessee Self Concept Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and a personal data questionnaire. The levels of self-concept of the subjects were taken as indicated by the means of the total positive scores of the Tennessee Self Concept Scale. The levels of the subjects' perceived stress were taken as indicated by the means from the Maslach Burnout Inventory in the areas of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal achievement. Pearson product-moment correlations were found to determine if a significant relationship existed between self-concept and the perceived stress of the subjects. Demographic data from the questionnaire were used to divide the subjects into categories which were investigated for significant differences. One way analyses of variance were performed of the self-concept and stress means of the categories to determine if significant differences existed. Statistical significance was chosen at the 0.05 alpha level. For the thirteen null hypotheses formulated and tested, it was concluded that the subjects indicating higher self-concept means, as measured by the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, also indicated lower stress means, as indicated on the Maslach Burnout Inventory, in the areas of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and higher means in the area of personal achievement. Null hypotheses formulated indicating no significant differences of stress or self-concept when the subjects were categorized by teaching methods, years of formal education, number of years of teaching experience, classroom racial dominance, number of students in the classroom, or marital status were all accepted. No significant differences were found at the 0.05 alpha level. The subjects of this study were shown to be similar in life style, education, and work environments. Further studies might bring to light differences if more varied teachers, teaching methods, and levels of education were taken into consideration. Replication of the study may also provide valuable information if performed with subjects from independent schools. A search for areas which the teachers feel are stress producing may also contribute to significant research.

Language: English

Published: Columbus, Ohio, 1981

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Emotion Recognition Development: Preliminary Evidence for an Effect of School Pedagogical Practices

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Learning and Instruction, vol. 69

Pages: 101353

Comparative education, Europe, Neuroscience, Switzerland, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: While emotion recognition is shaped through social interactions from a child's early years through at least late adolescence, no emphasis has thus far been given to the effects of daily experiences at school. We posited that enriched, more diverse, and less competitive social interactions fostered by some pedagogical practices may contribute to emotion recognition processes in children. Here, we investigated differences in emotion recognition among schoolchildren experiencing the Montessori versus traditional practices. Children performed two tasks; one measuring the impact of social context on fear-surprise perception, and one measuring their bias toward happiness or anger. Results suggest that children experiencing traditional practices show a higher sensitivity to fear-recognition, while children attending Montessori schools show a higher integration of social cues and perceive expressions of happiness for longer durations. Such preliminary findings call for replication and further research to determine which pedagogical features from the Montessori method may explain these effects.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.learninstruc.2020.101353

ISSN: 0959-4752

Report

An Evaluation of Montessori Education in South Carolina's Public Schools

Available from: The Riley Institute at Furman University

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: With support from the Self Family Foundation and the South Carolina Education Oversight Committee, the Riley Institute has completed a multi-year study of Montessori education in South Carolina’s public schools, the most comprehensive evaluation of public Montessori ever conducted in the United States. Between 2011 and 2016, this mixed-method study examined how Montessori impacts stakeholders in South Carolina and provided information needed to guide future investment in Montessori education. Researchers investigated the following as parts of the study: the extent to which schools implemented Montessori with fidelity; the demographic makeup of public school Montessori students; the effect of Montessori education on academic and behavioral outcomes; the impact of Montessori education on creativity, social skills, work habits, and executive function; and Montessori teachers’ perspectives on job satisfaction and the challenges of Montessori in the public sector. The study results demonstrate that students in public school Montessori classrooms across the state are faring well, as compared to similar nonMontessori public school students, when examining academic, behavioral, and affective outcomes.

Language: English

Published: Greenville, South Carolina, 2018

Video Recording

Introduction to the Montessori Math Curriculum: Preschool Through Elementary

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Abstract/Notes: Examines how the Montessori mathematics curriculum moves children from the concrete to the abstract.

Runtime: 18 minutes

Language: English

Published: Yellow Springs, Ohio, 2002

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