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Book Section

Written Language: The Old Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing; My First Experiments with Defective Children; First Experiments with Normal Children

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 199-216

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Master's Thesis

Comparing the Normalization of Children in Traditional and Montessori Kindergarten

Available from: University of Wisconsin

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Abstract/Notes: In this study, the author examined the level of Normalization kindergarten children display in a Montessori classroom and a traditional classroom. Normalization can be demonstrated through the child’s love of work, concentration, self-discipline and sociability. Data was gathered from the child and lead teacher through classroom observations, teacher questionnaires, child-interviews and a self-control test. Classroom observations in both environments gave insight into the child’s ability to focus and concentrate, as well as observable indications of a love of learning. Teacher questionnaire results were compiled and compared revealing children in Montessori classrooms have more room for choice, multi-sensory material use and more developed literacy skills. The child-interview results indicated that Montessori children were more sociable and self-reliant than traditional school children. Children attending Montessori kindergarten showed a greater level of self-discipline than traditional school children in the self-control test. Ideally, children attending a Montessori children’s house should continue their education for kindergarten into their third and final year. The discussion considers the ongoing benefits of staying in a Montessori environment for the kindergarten year.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2014

Article

Mrs. Ernest Thomson-Seton at Opening of Montessori School for New York Tenement Children

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: The Evening Record (Windsor, Ontario, Canada)

Pages: 8

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Abstract/Notes: "To prove that the Montessori system of education is both practical and available for the poor children of the tenements as well as for those who have every advantage that can be had for money, is the purpose of the Montessori Educational Association, which has just established a school for poor children in the upper East Side in one of the most thronged of the tenement sections of New York. The Montessori idea of education is diametrically opposed to the system in vogue. All the time commonly spent in training children to be passive is in the Montessori schools spent in awakening activity and encouraging initiative. Dr. Montessori, the founder of the new system of education, says that one of the most important tasks of the teacher lies in 'seeing that the child does not confound the idea of good with immobility, and evil with activity.' Instead of devoting months of arduous labor drilling the alphabet and elements of reading and writing into the heads of the little children, Montessori methods develop the various senses which give them control of the apparatur through which they must get all their knowledge of the world. One of the most remarkable things notied by the observers of the new school was the spontaneity with which the children learned to write. From tracing sand-paper letters and building of words by the aid of blocks, many of the children took up bits of chalk and began to write, not a few, but many words. The children learn to observe, to reason and to use their senses rather than clog their memoriy with useless rules. The school furnishes the little tots with luncheon, but even in this they are stimulated to activity. They have little waitresses who learn to move about freely and gracefully, to carry things without breaking them, and to avoid clumsiness and awkwardness. When the meal is over the children will all go into their small kitchen, roll up their sleeves and wash the dishes from which they had been eating. The picture shows Mrs. Ernest Thompson-Seton, the wife of Ernest Thompson-Seton, the Canadian author and naturalist, who is one of the trustees of the Montessori Educational Association, telling a little waitress to pose for the picture."

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effectiveness of Montessori Sensorial Training Program for Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities in Pakistan: A Randomized Control Trial

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Journal of Disability, Development and Education

Pages: 1-11

Asia, Children with disabilities, Developmentally disabled children, Pakistan, Sensorial education, Sensorial materials, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Intellectual disability is a serious lifelong disability that places heavy demands on society and the health system. The study was designed to determine the extent to which the intellectually challenged children are capable of improving their cognitive abilities as well as adaptive functioning through the Montessori Sensorial Training program when introduced in a different setting (i.e. special education school system). With randomised control trial (RCT) of pre-and post-testing, 30 children with mild intellectual disabilities were randomly allocated to Montessori Sensorial Training intervention condition (n = 15) and waitlist control condition (n = 15). The intervention group showed significant improvement in cognitive abilities (i.e. classification, seriation, recognition, ordination, and visual and auditory discrimination) as compared to the control group at post-assessment. Children who received training also showed improvement in communication and self-care domain as compared to the control group. This study provides evidence that Montessori Sensorial Training is not only effective for children going to mainstream schools but also for children with intellectual disabilities. Despite some limitations, the results of the study are encouraging and suggesting that Montessori Sensorial Training is an effective intervention to facilitate self-based learning, independence, and decision-making skills in children with mild intellectual disabilities.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/1034912X.2021.2016657

ISSN: 1034-912X

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Colour Preference Among Children in a Nigerian Montessori School

Available from: Mediterranean Center of Social and Educational Research (MCSER)

Publication: Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 325-332

Africa, Montessori schools, Nigeria, West Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Colour preference among children has been explored in a variety of populations and cultures. However, there is scanty research on the psychology of colour and, in particular, colour preference among children in Nigeria. Sixty (60) children (30 males and 30 females) randomly drawn from a population of students of a Montessori School in Ibadan, Nigeria participated in the study. A One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for Repeated Measures Design was used to test five hypotheses stated in the study. Results identified the order of colour preference by the children as red, yellow, tint, white, green, blue, brown and black. Red and yellow were significantly preferred to black. There was significant difference in order of colour among female children, children of age group 9-12 years and children of age group 3-8 years. In conclusion, red and yellow prove to be more stimulating and attractive than any other colour. These findings will be helpful to teaching agencies, and advertising companies and entrepreneurs that major in the production of children materials to know the right colour to use on their products. DOI: 10.5901/mjss.2014.v5n1p325

Language: English

DOI: 10.5901/mjss.2014.v5n1p325

ISSN: 2039-2117

Article

Fort Play: Children Recreate Recess

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 3

Pages: 20-30

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Recess beckons well before it actually arrives. Its allure can be heard in children's lunchtime conversations as they discuss imaginary roles, plans, alliances and teams, with an obvious appetite for play and its unbounded possibility. For some children, recess provides the most important reasons to come to school. In team sports, games of chase and tag, clique-bound conversations, solitary wandering and exploration, pretend and war play, recess offers reliable access to a scarce resource of immense value in the lives of children: spontaneous self-direction. Although watched over by the protective though generally unobtrusive gaze of supervising teachers, children at recess interact with their natural environment and with each other as they choose--a freedom denied them at other times while at school, and increasingly in their homes and neighborhood. As a lower elementary teacher at Lexington Montessori School (LMS) in Lexington, MA, from 1994 through 2002, the author witnessed for eight years the development of an extraordinary child-centered and spontaneous world of recess play (Powell, 2007). As children entered the elementary program at LMS, their peers initiated them into a culture of fort building. The forts, built entirely from sticks, leaves, and found objects from the surrounding woods, were the sites of considerable experimentation with different forms and rules of social organization and various styles of construction. They were also the vehicles for much of the conflict that occurred at the school. Children negotiated and clashed over ownership of land and resources and argued about the rules and roles of fort play and whether the rights of those already identified with a structure outweighed the rights of outsiders to be included. In doing so, they developed and influenced each other's reasoning about such moral principles as benevolence, justice, and reciprocity. Fort play was unpredictable, immediate, exciting, and fun, a brief window of opportunity,among hours of mostly adult-inspired activities and expectations, in which these children were free to manage their own lives and interact with each other on their own terms. As in the case of other schools where fort play has flourished, the LMS forts were in no way a programmed activity but rather a spontaneous one that simply wasn't stopped.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Cooperative Activities to Reduce Aggression in Young Children

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: I investigated the effect of introducing cooperative games during recess to reduce aggressive behaviors in preschool-age children. The action research was done at an intentionally culturally and socio-economically diverse Montessori school in St. Paul, Minnesota. The 23 children involved were all children from the three to six age group who take daily naps. I recorded every aggressive incident I saw before, during, and after the intervention. I also recorded what cooperative activities I introduced for the intervention. Once before and after the intervention I asked the children if they enjoyed recess. I recorded observational notes such as weather conditions, and what activities the children chose each day. The data did not show that the cooperative games had a significant effect on the number of aggressive incidents recorded. Many more boys than girls were involved in aggressive incidents. There was no significant change in how the children reported their enjoyment of recess. Aggressive behavior could possibly be reduced through another action research project with a longer intervention period, a conflict resolution plan, and more purposeful activities for the children outside.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Book

Montessori Strategies for Children with Learning Differences: The MACAR Model (Montessori Applied to Children At Risk)

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Learning disabilities, Montessori method of education

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Language: English

Published: Santa Rosa, California: Parent Child Press, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-939195-62-6 978-0-939195-63-3

Book Section

A Bibliography on Children for Parents, Focusing Upon Special Children

Book Title: Montessori and the Special Child

Pages: 150-152

Bibliographies, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Special education

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Language: English

Published: New York: Putnam, 1969

Report

Preschool Education for Inner-City Children: Preliminary Results of an Experimental Montessori Programme

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Early results from a Montessori nursery program initiated by Toronto, Canada, in 1971, to help inner-city children prepare for formal education indicate that the mothers of the 15 three- and four-year-old children were pleased with the program. Specifically, they felt that the children had increased their verbal skills, preparedness for junior kindergarten, and social maturity. However, not all mothers were pleased with the increased independence shown by some of the children. A study of the children's characteristics suggested that caution should be exerted in extrapolating the findings from other so-called disadvantaged children to inner-city children in one's own city. Other data are useful but the needs of a particular population must be carefully observed. When isolating deficiencies or identity needs, wholesale generalizations from superficial measures should not be made. Precise and explicit definitions should be made for such terms as deficient in language, intellectual motivation, or conceptual ability. Otherwise inadequate solutions are likely to result. (JS)

Language: English

Published: Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Nov 1971

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