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376 results

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

The Influence of Montessori-Based Literacy Instruction and Methods on Reading Achievement of Students in Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7

Available from: Seton Hall University eRepository

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines the influence of Montessori-based literacy curriculum and instruction on student achievement in Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. I studied 71 matched pairs of urban charter school students (n=142) to determine if there was a statistically significant difference in reading achievement, as measured by the Maryland School Assessment (MSA), between students who were instructed by their teachers in Montessori literacy methods and curriculum and students from a nearby charter school who were instructed by their teachers using a basal reading method. T-tests were used to compare the mean scores of the combined grade levels from each cohort on the 2011-2012 Maryland School Assessment (Reading section). The results of this study suggest that there was no significant difference in reading achievement between the two groups of students. There is very limited empirical research available examining reading achievement in Montessori public charter schools. Further research is recommended with similar groups of students from public Montessori school settings, or in this same setting with a different comparison group or a different evaluation tool.

Language: English

Published: South Orange, New Jersey, 2013

Master's Thesis

A Study of the Effectiveness of Instruction in Multi-Age Grading vs. Traditional Single-Grade Level Organization on the Reading Achievement of Fourth Graders

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: A study examined the effects of multi-age/grade instruction, compared to the traditional single-grade approach, on the reading achievement of fourth graders. Subjects, 22 fourth-graders in a single-grade class, were divided into instructional groups based on chronological age while the instructional grouping for 22 students in a combined fourth and fifth grade class at a neighboring school cut across age and grade levels. The Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills was used to measure the growth in "total reading" over a 1-year period. Results indicated no statistically significant difference between means of the two groups, although a positive mean score in favor of the multi-age instructional design was noted. (A 50-item bibliography, and the themes of study and sample lesson plans for both groups are attached.) (RS)

Language: English

Published: Danbury, Connecticut, 1989

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

A Comparison of Reading and Math Achievement for African American Third Grade Students in Montessori and Other Magnet Schools

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Journal of Negro Education, vol. 86, no. 4

Pages: 439-448

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Comparative education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Academic achievement, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, Reading - Academic achievement, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori programs are expanding in public schools, serving a large proportion of African American students. Although recent Montessori research has focused on diverse public school populations, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level. This quasi-experimental study compares reading and math achievement for African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet schools in a large, urban district in North Carolina. Scores from end-of-grade state tests of reading and math are compared using a multivariate analysis of covariance. No significant difference in math scores was identified, but students in Montessori schools scored significantly higher in reading. This suggests that Montessori lower elementary instruction may be beneficial for African American students.

Language: English

DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.86.4.0439

ISSN: 0022-2984, 2167-6437

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Multiage Programming Effects on Cognitive Developmental Level and Reading Achievement in Early Elementary School Children

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Reading Psychology, vol. 25, no. 1

Pages: 1-17

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Abstract/Notes: Differences in cognitive developmental level and reading achievement of elementary school children in multiage programming and traditional classrooms were explored. There is controversy regarding the benefit of multiage classrooms for learning academic subjects. According to previous research (e.g., Almy, Chittenden, & Miller, 1967; Brekke, Williams, & Harlow, 1973; Cromey, 1999), cognitive developmental level, reading achievement, and classroom type all seem to be related entities. This study assesses the effects of multiage classrooms compared to traditional classrooms on cognitive developmental level and reading ability of kindergartners, first graders, and second graders. The effects of cognitive developmental level on reading ability were also explored. The results support the connections among cognitive developmental level, reading ability, and classroom type.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/02702710490271800

ISSN: 0270-2711

Report

Reading and Math Achievement for African American Lower Elementary Students in Public Montessori Programs

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Arithmetic - Achievement, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Achievement, Montessori method of education, North America, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: As Montessori programs in public schools expand, Montessori education is becoming available to a more diverse population of American students than ever before. Students of color have a significant presence in public Montessori schools; over a quarter of students in whole-school public Montessori programs are African American. As these programs grow, researchers have increasingly directed their attention to demonstrating that Montessori works in public schools; however, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level, when critical reading and math skills are being established. This study sought to answer the question, how effectively does Montessori instruction promote achievement for African American third grade students in reading and math, compared to similar traditional schools and other public school choice programs?

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 2016

Article

Reading and the Brain, Part 1: Developing the Reading Circuit

Available from: White Paper Press

Publication: Montessori White Papers, vol. 2

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Language: English

Report

A Voluntary Prekindergarten Language Development and Reading Program for the Entire Four-Year-Old Population of a City (An Investigation of Machine-Taught Reading) Final Report

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Four studies conducted by the Mount Vernon Public Schools over a period of five semesters involved machine-teaching reading to 240 disadvantaged prekindergarten children from the children's center and the child development center to prepare them for more successful kindergarten learning through academically-oriented readiness activities in an American Montessori classroom setting. The children's center subjects attended 1-hour sessions while the child development center subjects attended 3-hour sessions. Experimental groups from both centers used the Edison-Responsive-environment talking typewriter and the story-telling-automatic reading tutor machines with programs which utilized linguistic vowel-sounds methods. The control groups used the same machines but did not receive program training. Results showed superior performance by the program subjects, but there were no significant differences in the performance of program subjects using different teaching machines. The 1-hour session proved to be as effective as the 3-hour session. These results imply that greater consideration should be given to more economical program systems and that class time could be reduced by half without loss in learning.

Language: English

Published: Mount Vernon, New York, Feb 1968

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Developing Reading Automaticity and Fluency: Revisiting What Reading Teachers Know, Putting Confirmed Research into Current Practice

Available from: Scientific Research Publishing (SCIRP)

Publication: Creative Education, vol. 9, no. 6

Pages: 838-855

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Abstract/Notes: This article revisits research on reading automaticity and fluency with the goal of helping beginning reading teachers put confirmed research findings into current classroom practice. The article examines the concepts of automaticity and fluency, how both impact the development of skillful reading. The article reviews research on: a) reading strategies children use, and b) repeat reading teaching strategies to develop fluency. Case scenarios illustrate key findings. Based on the research and case scenarios, four conclusions are drawn: 1) The terms automaticity and fluency are often interchanged; the concepts are not the same; 2) Understanding the differences between automaticity and fluency can impact repeat reading teaching strategies; 3) There is an assumption that rapid word recognition is the same cognitive process as automatic word decoding; and 4) There are two pathways to fluent reading, rapid word recognition, and automatic decoding ability. The article presents a theoretical model which aligns with childhood learning theories, offering teachers a variation in repeat reading teaching strategies. Rather than repeating reading the same text, opportunities to read slightly different, decodable text improves decoding, builds fluency, and thus strengthens children’s reading comprehension of complex text.

Language: English

DOI: 10.4236/ce.2018.96062

ISSN: 2151-4755, 2151-4771

Article

Program Profiles [Clissold School, Chicago, Illinois; Bonneville Elementary School, Pocatello, Idaho; Reading Community School, Reading, Ohio]

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 9

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Montessori: The Act of Reading and the Art of Reading

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 2

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Language: English

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