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Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Book Workshops on Emergent Reading Skills in Montessori Early Childhood

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research study was to increase preliteracy skills, confidence, and interest in reading in a Montessori early childhood environment through a reading workshop model. Given the pressure on teachers to create stronger readers at younger ages, this work discusses developmentally appropriate language tasks for children ages three- to six-years-old using the Montessori method and emergent literacy theory frameworks. Research suggests children who exhibit confidence and interest in reading develop strong preliteracy skills. These factors predict capable and active readers. For six weeks, a Montessori early childhood classroom of 14 students and three adult guides participated in daily 30-minute reading workshops. These workshops included a short explicit language lesson lasting under 10 minutes, followed by an extended free reading time. The development of preliteracy skills, student confidence in skills, and interest in reading were tracked through formative assessments, observation, student-teacher conferencing, and student self-assessments. After the intervention, an increase in preliteracy skills, interest, and confidence were noted. The students requested to continue reading workshops due to high interest. Further work is needed to analyze the development of reading skills through the reading workshop intervention.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Doctoral Dissertation

Improving Early Reading Skills of First-Grade Students with Learning Disabilities Using Montessori Learning Strategies

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, People with disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: This study focused on helping students with learning disabilities to improve their listening comprehension and acquire early reading skills of decoding, reading and understanding what a word and two- or -three-word phrases say. Since reading at the advanced stage involves comprehension of sentences and paragraphs, in this study, building the foundation of reading at the word level is the logical place to start. With that skill in place, combining words into a phrase and understanding what it means will be the next step. Meanwhile, helping the students understand what was read to them through questioning builds their listening comprehension skills, which will be a great help in reading comprehension once the students have advanced enough to read sentences and paragraphs. The target group used for this study included six 1st graders with learning disabilities, who had difficulties with reading and comprehending. These 1st graders with learning disabilities were not taught one-on-one due to large class size. They had no knowledge of phonics. They could not relate the sounds they heard to the letters of the alphabet. The curriculum-based assessment (CBA) model was the alternative assessment model that was used to assess the students. The 12-week intensive study focused on two variables: a dependent variable and an independent variable. The dependent variable was reading at the word and phrase level, and the independent variable was word sound, blending vowels, consonant blending, and consonant and vowel blending. The scientific methodology was the single subject model, a 1-minute assessment. Each student was assessed for 1 minute each day for 3 days. The results of the assessment were used to determine the baseline before the intervention implementation. This methodology is also known as "AB Design." AB refers to a two-phase design, the baseline phase and the intervention phase. The intervention phase was introduced after the baseline phase was established and recorded in data format. Intervention data were recorded as well. The data collected were graphed in two phases. The results showed that the students were able to learn how to read and acquire comprehension within the 12 weeks. The reading strategies that were used in this study were based on Montessori's methods, which is a methodology in learning how to decode words which leads to automatic reading. These strategies are being used in Montessori schools throughout Dade County public schools, but not particularly with special education students. The results of this study were positive.

Language: English

Published: Cincinnati, Ohio, 2003

Conference Paper

The Effects of Kentucky's Primary Program on Three Measures of Academic Achievement

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Seattle, Washington, April 10-14, 2001)

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Abstract/Notes: In Kentucky, nongraded primary education became a reality under the mandate of the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) in 1990. Research has produced some anecdotal information on the degree to which schools have implemented the ungraded primary program, but there has been no research to link the implementation of the primary program to student achievement or school improvement. Under the regulations growing from the KERA, schools devised different organizational arrangements for the ungraded classrooms, characterized by developmentally appropriate practices and multi-age, multi-ability classrooms. The variance in how students were configured in the multi-age classrooms continued to be a source of conflict and discussion regarding the nongraded primary school program. This study examined the relationship, if any, between the degree of implementation of the primary program and three measures of student achievement: (1) the Kentucky Instructional Results Information System (KIRIS)

Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Montessori Reading and Math Instruction for Third Grade African American Students in Urban Elementary Schools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American children, African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Improving academic achievement for students of color has long been the subject of debate among advocates of education reform (Anyon, 2013; Breitborde & Swiniarski, 2006; Payne, 2008). Some scholars have advocated for the Montessori method as an alternative educational approach to address some chronic problems in public education (Lillard, 2005; Murray, 2011, 2015; Torrance, 2012). Montessori programs are expanding in public schools (National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector, 2014c) at a time when the American public school population is more racially diverse than ever before (Maxwell, 2014). A review of the literature reflects a lack of consensus about the efficacy of Montessori elementary instruction for students of color in general, and lack of attention to outcomes for African American students specifically (Dawson, 1987; Dohrmann, Nishisda, Gartner, Lipsky, & Grimm, 2007; Lopata, Wallace, & Finn, 2005; Mallet & Schroeder, 2015). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of reading and math instruction for third grade African American students in public Montessori, traditional, and other school choice settings, using end-of-grade standardized test scores from a large, urban district in North Carolina. Stratified sampling was used to select demographically similar traditional and magnet schools for comparison. Group mean reading and math test scores were compared using factorial MANCOVA and MANOVA procedures. African American students at grade three were found to perform at significantly higher levels in both reading and math in public Montessori schools than in traditional schools. No statistically significant difference was found in math achievement between African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet programs, although the Montessori group did achieve at significantly higher levels in reading. This suggests that the Montessori method can be an effective pedagogy for African American students, particularly in reading. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for policy, practice, and future research.

Language: English

Published: Charlotte, North Carolina, 2016

Article

Shared Reading: Critical to a Balanced Reading Program

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 29, no. 3

Pages: 14–19

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Language: English

Holistic Reading in a Montessori Classroom: An Examination of the Reading Miscues and Perceived Strategies of Children Who Have Completed One Year in a Montessori Elementary Classroom

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Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, 1992

Article

Montessori: The Act of Reading and the Art of Reading

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 2

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Language: English

Article

School Environment and Methods of Teaching as Correlates of Language Skills Achievement of Pre–Primary School Pupils in Edo State Nigeria

Available from: Asian Institute of Research

Publication: Education Quarterly Reviews, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 243-251

Africa, Comparative education, Montessori method of education, Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The study investigated the effects of school environment and methods of teaching on language skills achievement of pre – primary school pupils in Edo State. It also investigated the interaction effects of Montessori and played methods and urban and rural environments on pupils' achievement in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Three urban and three rural areas which were selected from two Local Government Areas (LGAs) were used for the study. Six pre - primary schools were purposively selected for the study. A total of 228 kindergartens 2 pupils intact classes were used for the study which lasted for eight weeks. The study was a pretest, posttest, quasi- experimental control group design with independent variables as methods and school location while achievement in Language Skills Achievement Test (LSAT) was the dependent variable. Descriptive statistics and Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) were used to analyze the data obtained while the Multiple Classification Analysis (MCA) was used as post-hoc test for further significance. Three research questions were answered with three hypotheses, tested at 0.05 level of significance. Results showed that the Montessori Method of teaching pre –primary pupils was more effective than the play method. Similarly, urban school pupils achieved higher than their rural counterparts. There was also a significant interaction effect of methods and school location on pupils' academic achievement in Language skills. It was therefore recommended that the Nigerian Government should adopt the Montessori Method as a dominant method of teaching pre – primary school pupils and that pre – primary school owners should provide materials adequately for teaching and learning.

Language: English

DOI: 10.31014/aior.1993.04.03.335

ISSN: 2621-5799, 2657-215X

Article

The Effect of Using Montessori Method on Developing Kindergartener's Speaking and Reading skills

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: مجلة التربية في القرن 21 للدراسات التربوية والنفسية [Journal of Education in the 21st Century for Educational and Psychological Studies], vol. 1, no. 10

Pages: 1-23 (Article 3)

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Egypt, Language development, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North Africa, Reading - Academic achievement

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Abstract/Notes: play and have fun, the learning and teaching processes should be suited totheir nature. There is a number of known interesting learning activitieswhich are based on the arts, games and other oral activities. Thus Englishshould be taught as a means of communication and researchers should dotheir best to help EFL learners to develop their reading and speaking skills.Ur (2000: 12) declared that "out of all the four skills ,listening,speaking, reading and writing, speaking seems the most important, peoplewho speak a language are known as speakers of the language, as if speakingincluded all other kinds of knowing a target language" Today, many secondlanguage learners give the speaking skill priority in their learning because ifthey master this skill then they will be considered as if they have masteredall of the other skills.The importance of speaking is best shown with the integration of theother language skills. For instance, speaking can help students develop theirvocabulary and grammar and improve their writing skill. Ability to read isthe primary fundamental skill required for children to achieve academicsuccess. Currently, the expectation is that all children should begin readingearly and be able to read on grade level by third grade (U.S. Department ofEducation, 2002)Another way that speaking and reading are connected is throughdecoding .decoding is the process of pulling apart the sounds that each(1)letter makes, and then putting them back together to make a word.it is mucheasier for a child to sound out a word on the page that they have alreadyheard in conversation, than a completely new word. There less informationto process since the meaning and the pronunciation of the word are alreadyknown. A child who has heard more words spoken is at an advantage whenlearning to read, the skill of reading is special and often difficult to acquire.the fact that anyone learns how to read is something of a miracle. Learningto read is different from learning to speak; in the development of humanhistory, speaking precedes reading by thousands of yearsItalian educator and physician Maria Montessori developed aninnovative teaching methodology for children that left an indelible mark oneducation curricula throughout the world. Montessori education is a sensorybasedpedagogy that is based on the belief that children learn at their ownpace through manipulation of objects (Lopata, Wallace, & Finn,2005).According to Montessori, (Montessori, 1967, p.14). the goal ofeducation is “to be able to find activities that are so intrinsically meaningfulthat we want to throw ourselves into them” (Crain : 2004) confirmed thisassertion by noting that “when children find tasks that enable them todevelop their naturally emerging capacities, they become interested in themand concentrate deeply on them.In general, there is a need for more research regarding successfuleducational methods and pedagogy for this disenfranchised populationbecause the existing research does not adequately provide educationalplanners with the resources or information to develop effective programs(Williams:2001) examined the impact of the Montessori Method on(2)refugee children‟s social, cognitive and motor development using adifference-in-difference approach .The Montessori method of teachingaimed the fullest possible development of the whole child, ultimatelypreparing him for life‘s many rich experiences. Complemented by hertraining in medicine, psychology and anthropology, Dr .Maria Montessori(1870-1952) developed her philosophy of education based upon actualobservation of children.Students are assigned their own personal workstations designed witheducational items that correspond to the daily lesson plans and activities.Students are responsible for setting up the work area, choosing the learningactivity, applying the physical materials, and returning the materials back tothe shelves (Pickering: 2004).Children are always free to move around theroom and are not given deadlines for the various learning tasks. Desks arearranged into open networks that encourage meaningful group discourse, aswell as independent learning.Students work together with the teachers to organize time strategicallyin order to complete the necessary learning tasks of the day. The amount ofteachers in the classroom varies based on class size, but usually two teachersare used for sections with thirty or more students, In most settings, childrenare grouped in mixed ages and abilities based on three to six-year incrementssuch as 0-3, 3-6, 6-12, 12-15 and 15-18 (other Montessori schools use onlythree year increment settings). Ages are mixed so that older students canassist and mentor the younger children in the group. Students are groupedaccording to common interests and experiences rather than the ability andskill level (Pickering: 2004).According to Montessori, from birth to age three the child learnsprimarily through the “unconscious absorbent mind.” During education in(3)the first three years, Montessori believed that it was necessary for theparents to develop in the role of unobtrusive educator; there to protect andguide without infringing on the child‟s right to self-discovery (Crain: 2004).This early developmental model enabled children to learn their own skillsat their own place. During the ages of three to six the child begins to utilizethe “conscious absorbent mind” which prompts students to participate increative problem-solving consisting of wooden and metal objects of varioussizes and shapes, personally designed by Montessori. If a problem becomestoo difficult or overwhelming for the student, the teacher delays the projectfor a future day. Children also engage in practical work consisting ofhousehold tasks and personal maintenance.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/jsep.2020.84322

ISSN: 2682-1931

Article

Reading Workshop in the Montessori Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 3

Pages: 36-43

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: During the 2012-2013 school year, Metropolitan Montessori School, on Manhattan's Upper West Side, a school for 3-to-12-year-olds, adopted a reading workshop approach. This decision resulted from several recognized needs. One need was to provide teachers with a strong, clear framework for literacy instruction, particularly at the emergent reading level. In other subject areas, such as math and cultural subjects, the approach was fairly consistent from classroom to classroom. Teachers used shared language to discuss students' progress (e.g., Jimmy has just started the stamp game; Lara is struggling with dynamic addition), but they did not have similar language when discussing children's progress in reading. Another need was to support not just decoding and phonics, but that other crucial arm of reading development: reading comprehension. Teachers had long noticed that there were gaps between the words that children were able to read and the meaning they were deriving from their reading. This gap appeared increasingly pronounced as children became older and expectations became higher. This article describes how and why the reading workshop approach was undertaken, key principles of the workshop, how it works with the Montessori curriculum, and what was learned while integrating the approach.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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