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518 results

Book

Self-Reliance: A Practical and Informal Discussion of Methods of Teaching Self-Reliance, Initiative and Responsibility to Modern Children

Available from: Internet Archive

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Language: English

Published: Indianapolis, Indiana: Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1916

Article

Normality and Deviation (in Children and the Montessori School)

Publication: The Sower, no. 130

Pages: 23-31

Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings, Montessori method of education

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Language: English

Article

Cultural Studies and Children's Knowledge and Understanding of the World

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 66

Pages: 8–9

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Montessori to Teach 25 San Diego Children

Available from: NewsBank - San Diego Evening Tribune Historical

Publication: San Diego Evening Tribune (San Diego, California)

Pages: 4

Americas, International Montessori Training Course (3rd [course 1], Los Angeles and San Diego, USA, May - July 1915), Katherine Moore - Biographic sources, Mary Powell Jordan - Biographic sources, Mary Powell Jordan - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education - Study and teaching, Montessori method of education - Teacher training, North America, Panama-California Exposition (1915-1916, San Diego, California), United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Includes a list of "25 San Diego children" who will be taught by Montessori, and information pertaining to Montessori's schedule and accommodations.

Language: English

Article

Montessori's Ideal Included All Children

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 2

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Endangered Minds: Why Children Don't Think and What We Can Do about It (Written by Jane M. Healy Ph.D.)

Publication: Montessori Matters

Pages: 15

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Abstract/Notes: book review

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Why Do the Children (Pretend) Play?

Available from: Cell Press (Elsevier)

Publication: Trends in Cognitive Sciences, vol. 21, no. 11

Pages: 826-834

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Abstract/Notes: The study of play in both animals and humans is flourishing. The purpose of human pretend play is not known. By analogy to play fighting in animals, evidence is presented suggesting that pretend play might improve sensitivity to social signals and emotion regulation in humans. Pretend play appears to be an evolved behavior because it is universal and appears on a set schedule. However, no specific functions have been determined for pretend play and empirical tests for its functions in humans are elusive. Yet animal play fighting can serve as an analog, as both activities involve as-if, metacommunicative signaling and symbolism. In the rat and some other animals, adaptive functions of play fighting include assisting social behavior and emotion regulation. Research is presented suggesting that pretend play might serve similar functions for humans.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2017.08.001

ISSN: 1364-6613, 1879-307X

Book Section

Beyond Day Care: Full-Day Montessori for Migrant and Other Language-Minority Children

Available from: Books to Borrow @ Internet Archive

Book Title: Montessori in Contemporary American Culture

Pages: 215-228

Americas, Displaced communities, Montessori method of education, North America, Refugees, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: Portsmouth, New Hampshire: Heinemann, 1992

ISBN: 0-435-08709-6 978-0-435-08709-8

Book Section

Mabel's Grandchildren and the Montessori System

Available from: Books to Borrow @ Internet Archive

Book Title: Mabel Bell: Alexander's Silent Partner

Pages: 178-186

Alexander Graham Bell - Biographic sources, Americas, Canada, Mabel Bell - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America

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Language: English

Published: New York: Methuen, 1984

ISBN: 978-0-458-98090-1

Doctoral Dissertation

Where Have All the Children Gone? A Case Study of Three American Preschools

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: In sociological investigation, Weber (1968) believes that concrete historical events can be interpreted in terms of social action. These patterns of action differ from historical accounts, which explore the importance of causal explanation of individual events. Entwistle and Alexander (1993) contend that sociologists of education have paid little attention to patterns of class interaction and inequality in preschools. Adding to Hartley's (1993) work on nursery schools in Scotland, and using an organizational model with a sociohistorical standpoint, this ethnographic case study helps to bridge that gap by concentrating on the historical and ecological contexts of (1) a Laboratory school; (2) a Montessori school; and, (3) a Head Start center. The central problem of the study seeks an answer to the question "If inequalities in preschools exist, what do they look like?" This study assumes that historically educational systems have exerted a form of social control over children in order to transmit cultural values. Part I of the study examines ancient and modern societies, their cultures and their philosophical grounding to reveal the values and trends that contribute to social change in the early education of children. Part II adds a triangulation strategy to explore the ecology (environment and culture) of the three schools in the study. These strategies include archival content analysis of the preschool organizations, nonparticipant observation of the classrooms (Bell, 1993), intensive interviewing of the staff and administration members and a brief survey of the preschool parents. This study draws from the sociology of Weber's "ideal bureaucracy," Berger's "bureaucratic cognitive style," Elias' "civilizing process," Bernstein's "visible and invisible" pedagogy, Bourdieu's "cultural capital" and Anyon's "biased ideological messages." In this exploratory study, the data analysis uses a descriptive methodology, not to draw conclusions, but similar to Glaser and Strauss' "grounded theory" to introduce questions to be explored further by researchers. A final section on policy recommendations is included.

Language: English

Published: Boston, Massachusetts, 2000

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