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518 results

Article

How Can Art Appreciation Enhance the Self-Concept of Children in the Area of Language Development? (A Montessori Approach)

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 7, no. 4

Pages: 5

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Language: English

A Comparison of the Effects of Two Child-Centered Models of Educational Intervention on Three Selected Creative Abilities of Pre-School Children, Fluency, Originality, and Imagination

Comparative education, Creative ability in children, Creative thinking in children, Imagination in children, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Preschool children

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Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 1984

Article

A Beacon in East Harlem [East Harlem Children's Center Montessori School, New York]

Publication: AMS News, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 2

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Language: English

ISSN: 0065-9444

Article

Listening: Its Importance in the Development of Young Children [Talk given by David Ward, February, 1985]

Publication: Montessori Quarterly, vol. 24

Pages: 7–14

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Language: English

Article

To the Parents of Montessori Children

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Around the Child, vol. 10

Pages: 84-86

Montessori method of education, Parents

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Language: English

ISSN: 0571-1142

Article

Affirming Children's Minds

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 10, no. 1

Pages: 33–36

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Abstract/Notes: Keynote address at AMS Annual Seminar, Chicago, IL, April, 1997

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Questions and Answers [Is Montessori only for certain groups of children?]

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 3

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effects of Traditional Versus Montessori Schooling on 4- to 15-Year Old Children's Performance Monitoring

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Mind, Brain, and Education, vol. 14, no. 2

Pages: 167-175

Comparative education, Europe, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Neuroscience, Switzerland, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Through performance monitoring individuals detect and learn from unexpected outcomes, indexed by post-error slowing and post-error improvement in accuracy. Although performance monitoring is essential for academic learning and improves across childhood, its susceptibility to educational influences has not been studied. Here we compared performance monitoring on a flanker task in 234 children aged 4 through 15, from traditional or Montessori classrooms. While traditional classrooms emphasize that students learn from teachers' feedback, Montessori classrooms encourage students to work independently with materials specially designed to support learners discovering errors for themselves. We found that Montessori students paused longer post-error in early childhood and, by adolescence, were more likely to self-correct. We also found that a developmental shift from longer to shorter pauses post-error being associated with self-correction happened younger in the Montessori group. Our findings provide preliminary evidence that educational experience influences performance monitoring, with implications for neural development, learning, and pedagogy.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/mbe.12233

ISSN: 1751-228X

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori et les Enfants Nomades: Forme Scolaire et Mouvement de l'Enfant [Montessori and Nomadic Children: School Form and Movement of the Child]

Available from: Open Edition

Publication: Tréma, no. 50

Child development, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori schools

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Abstract/Notes: Cet article entend tenter de rendre compte du régime spatio-temporel spécifique qui est celui des enfants de maternelle Montessori, ce dernier entrant en contradiction ou en friction avec la forme scolaire traditionnelle. Ces pratiques entendent en effet modifier le centre de gravité du « travail » de l’enseignant vers l’enfant, et pour cela libérer le mouvement de ce dernier. [This article attempts to give an account of the specific spatio-temporal mode of Montessori schools, which is in conflict with the traditional “school form”. These practices intend to modify the center of gravity of the activities of the school, from the teacher towards the child, and for this to release the movement of the latter. We first propose to define what a Montessori practice might be, or to define the questions and problems that such an attempt at definition raises; we then seek to describe the primary effect that this spatio-temporal mode produces in the classroom: child walkers, or nomadic children.]

Language: French

DOI: 10.4000/trema.4309

ISSN: 1167-315X

Book

Early Childhood Bilingualism in the Montessori Children's House: Guessable Context and the Planned Environment

Available from: ERIC

Bilingual education, Bilingualism, Language experience approach in education

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Abstract/Notes: The language immersion approach of the Intercultural Montessori School (Oak Park, Illinois) for children aged 2-6 years is described and discussed. An introductory section gives background information on early work with immersion by Maria Montessori, a personal experience leading to the school's establishment, and the response of language and education professionals, the public, and parents to the concept of preschool immersion. Subsequent sections discuss common patterns in the students' language learning experience at the school and the developmental stages the learners went through as the experiment progressed: pre-production; early production; speech emergence; and intermediate fluency. Anecdotal information about specific students and events are used for illustration. Observations about comprehensible input and the Montessori manipulables, whole language, and other instructional strategies are included. Specific recommendations are made for content and classroom procedures in early childhood immersion, based on this experience. The paper concludes with reflections on the potential of this environment for development of bilingualism.

Language: English

Published: Oak Park, Illinois: InterCultura Montessori School, 1997

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