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93 results

Article

African Safari

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 2, no. 3

Pages: 37

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Two South African Views...

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 67

Pages: 29

Africa, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Montessori in Soweto: A South African School That Soars - The National Movement That Inspired it

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 14, no. 2

Pages: 22-25

Africa, Public Montessori, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Language: English

Article

African Partnerships

Publication: Montessori Leadership

Pages: 9–10

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

African Harmony [Durban, South Africa]

Publication: Montessori Courier, vol. 3, no. 5

Pages: 24–25

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0959-4108

Article

Why Montessori Education Today?: One American's Viewpoint

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku [Montessori Education], no. 14

Pages: 86-94

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Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Article

Exploring South African preschool teachers’ roles and responsibilities with executive functions

Available from: AOSIS Publishing

Publication: South African Journal of Childhood Education, vol. 12, no. 1

Pages: Article 1141 (9 pages)

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Executive function, Montessori method of education, Preschool education, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: South African studies based on school readiness found that most children who commence formal schooling (from Grade 1) lack the basic skills needed to adapt within the learning environment – these include having challenges to follow instructions, work autonomously or focus on a task. The national guideline for teaching children between birth to 9 years does not specify how early childhood education programmes can facilitate or strengthen executive function (EF) skills through structured play. Structured play, can be understood as play activities that require guidance and instructions for completion. During the activities, the participants have to follow instructions in order to attain the outcome. Hence, there is a need to explore how EF skills can be developed through structured play. From our understanding, EF is an individual’s cognitive ability to regulate thoughts and actions needed to complete a task. Executive function skills assist learners to adjust and work effectively later (Grade 1) in a formal learning environment to perform academically. The study was conducted at preschool sites that follow different educational approaches. They are Montessori, National Curriculum Framework (NCF), Reggio Emilia and Independent Schools Association of Southern Africa (ISASA) preschools. The preschools are situated in affluent suburbs of Pretoria, Gauteng. In this article, learners refer to children aged 4 years in the Grade RRR class. A qualitative multiple case study design was utilised. We interacted with two teachers from four schools who followed different educational approaches. The data collection techniques included individual semi-structured interviews, lesson observation and document analysis, whilst photographs and field notes were taken when the teacher-participants interacted with learners during a planned learning experience. The generated data sets were inductively analysed and interpreted using the theoretical frameworks of sociocultural theory and metacognition. The interpreted data sets revealed that the preschool teacher-participants can facilitate EF using games, songs, movement exercises or racing competitions. The participants explained that indoor, outdoor and learning experiences facilitated EF skills such as self-regulation, working memory and cognitive flexibility during structured play. There is a need for preschool teachers to identify EF in the curriculum and know how to link and intentionally include the skills in daily learning experiences. This will ensure learners acquire EF and apply it in formal learning environments. The contribution to the body of scholarship is the development of guidelines for teachers to intentionally and explicitly develop EF skills using structured play. We confer that teachers play a role in enabling fun, engaging and hands-on activities that promote the acquisition of EF in the early years.

Language: English

DOI: 10.4102/sajce.v12i1.1141

ISSN: 2223-7682

Article

Racial Discipline Disproportionality in Montessori and Traditional Public Schools: A Comparative Study Using the Relative Rate Index

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 14-27

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, School discipline, Teacher-student relationships, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Research from the past 40 years indicates that African American students are subjected to exclusionary discipline, including suspension and expulsion, at rates two to three times higher than their White peers (Children’s Defense Fund, 1975; Skiba, Michael, Nardo, & Peterson, 2002). Although this phenomenon has been studied extensively in traditional public schools, rates of racially disproportionate discipline in public Montessori schools have not been examined. The purpose of this study is to examine racial discipline disproportionality in Montessori public elementary schools as compared to traditional elementary schools. The Relative Rate Index (RRI) is used as a measure of racially disproportionate use of out-of-school suspensions (Tobin & Vincent, 2011). Suspension data from the Office of Civil Rights Data Collection was used to generate RRIs for Montessori and traditional elementary schools in a large urban district in the Southeast. While statistically significant levels of racial discipline disproportionality are found in both the Montessori and traditional schools, the effect is substantially less pronounced in Montessori settings. These findings suggest that Montessori schools are not immune to racially disproportionate discipline and should work to incorporate more culturally responsive classroom management techniques. Conversely, the lower levels of racially disproportionate discipline in the Montessori schools suggests that further study of discipline in Montessori environments may provide lessons for traditional schools to promote equitable discipline.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v1i1.4941

ISSN: 2378-3923

Archival Material Or Collection

Mary Bethune Montessori Day Care Center, 444 University, St. Paul

Available from: Minnesota Historical Society

African American children, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Extent: 1

Article

Malcolm X Cousin Conducts Montessori School for Negroes

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, California)

Pages: B1

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Hakim Jamal - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The scene, viewed by the white suburbanite, is a startling one: twenty-two black children, aged 2 to 5., learning to use their senses and develop their reasoning powers in a roomful of Montessori system devices under the quiet guidance of a Hindu woman from Bombay.

Language: English

ISSN: 0458-3035

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