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115 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

An Outline of Arithmetic Learning—(I.)

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: Journal of Education (Boston), vol. 80, no. 11

Pages: 292-297

Americas, Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/002205741408001107

ISSN: 0022-0574, 2515-5741

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Longitudinal Comparison of Montessori versus Non-Montessori Students’ Place-Value and Arithmetic Knowledge

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 1-15

Americas, Comparative education, Mathematics education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Base-10 and place value understanding are important foundational math concepts that are associated with higher use of decomposition strategies and higher accuracy on addition problems (Laski, Ermakova, & Vasilyeva, 2014; Fuson, 1990; Fuson & Briars, 1990; National Research Council, 2001). The current study examined base-10 knowledge, place value, and arithmetic accuracy and strategy use for children in early elementary school from Montessori and non-Montessori schools. Children (N = 150) were initially tested in either kindergarten or first grade. We followed up with a subgroup of the sample (N = 53) two years later when the children were in 2nd and 3rd grade. Although Montessori curriculum puts a large emphasis on the base-10 structure of number, we found that children from Montessori schools only showed an advantage on correct use of base-10 canonical representation in kindergarten but not in first grade. Moreover, there were no program differences in place value understanding in 2nd and 3rd grade. Although Montessori children used different strategies to obtain answers to addition problems in 2nd and 3rd grade as compared with non-Montessori children, there were no program differences in addition accuracy at any grade level. Educational implications are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v2i1.5677

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Teaching Arithmetical Division

Available from: The Times Educational Supplement Historical Archive - Gale

Publication: The Times Educational Supplement (London, England)

Pages: 332

England, Europe, Great Britain, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Mathematics education, Montessori method of education - Teacher training, Northern Europe, Teacher training, United Kingdom

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Language: English

ISSN: 0040-7887

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

A Comparison of Academic Achievement of Montessori and Non-Montessori Students in a Public School Setting

Available from: Florida International University

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Abstract/Notes: Relationships between academic achievement and type of curriculum delivery system, Montessori or traditional, in a diverse group of learners from a public school district were examined in this study. In a repeated measures, within subjects design, students from an elementary Montessori program were paired with agemates from a traditional group on the basis of similar Stanford Achievement Test Scores in reading or math during the baseline year. Two subsequent administrations of the Stanford were observed for each subject to elucidate possible differences which might emerge based on program affiliation over the three year duration of the study. Mathematics scores for both groups were not observed to be significantly different, although following the initial observation, the Montessori group continued to produce higher mean scores than did the traditional students. Marginal significance between the groups suggests that the data analysis should continue in an effort to elucidate a possible trend toward significance at the .05 level. Reading scores for the groups demonstrated marginally significant differences by one analytical method, and significant differences when analyzed with a second method. In the second and third years of the study, Montessori students produced means which consistently outperformed the traditional group. Recommendations included tracking subsequent administrations of the Stanford Achievement Test for all pairs of subjects in order to evaluate emerging trends in both subject areas.

Language: English

Published: Miami, Florida, 1999

Article

Lifetime Achievement Awards

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 22, no. 2

Pages: 9

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

The Influence of Montessori-Based Literacy Instruction and Methods on Reading Achievement of Students in Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7

Available from: Seton Hall University eRepository

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines the influence of Montessori-based literacy curriculum and instruction on student achievement in Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. I studied 71 matched pairs of urban charter school students (n=142) to determine if there was a statistically significant difference in reading achievement, as measured by the Maryland School Assessment (MSA), between students who were instructed by their teachers in Montessori literacy methods and curriculum and students from a nearby charter school who were instructed by their teachers using a basal reading method. T-tests were used to compare the mean scores of the combined grade levels from each cohort on the 2011-2012 Maryland School Assessment (Reading section). The results of this study suggest that there was no significant difference in reading achievement between the two groups of students. There is very limited empirical research available examining reading achievement in Montessori public charter schools. Further research is recommended with similar groups of students from public Montessori school settings, or in this same setting with a different comparison group or a different evaluation tool.

Language: English

Published: South Orange, New Jersey, 2013

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

A Comparison of the Achievement Test Performance of Children Who Attended Montessori Schools and Those Who Attended Non-Montessori Schools in Taiwan

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Asia, China, East Asia, Taiwan

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Abstract/Notes: There are two purposes of the current study. First was to examine whether or not children in the elementary school in Taiwan who had received Montessori early childhood education obtain significantly higher scores on tests of language arts, math, and social studies than children who attended non-Montessori pre-elementary programs. Second one was to examine whether or not the number years of Montessori education has a positive impact on the students' scores when they are in elementary grades. According to Chattin-McNichols (1992b), children from Montessori education program are doing better in some respects than other programs. Some studies have found that in the United States, Montessori students have strong academic outcomes especially in language arts than non-Montessori students (Daux, 1995; Hobbs, 2008; Lillard & Else-Quest, 2006; Manner, 1999). The present study involved 196 participants from a private Catholic elementary school in Taipei City, Taiwan. Ninety-eight first, second, and third grade students had Montessori early childhood experience and 98 first, second, and third grade students did not have Montessori early childhood experience. Using one-way MANOVA as a statistical tool, there were mixed results in the present study. The results showed students who had Montessori early childhood education experience had higher test scores of language arts than the students who did not have Montessori education experience. In conclusion, the present study partially supports the findings of other studies and shows that Montessori education has some long-term impact on the students' language arts learning.

Language: English

Published: Terre Haute, Indiana, 2009

Book Section

Detecting the achievements in INVALSI National Surveys of students who followed educational innovations: a five steps method

Available from: Torrossa

Book Title: Use of INVALSI data in school. V seminar “INVALSI data: a tool for teaching and scientific research”

Pages: 41-59

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Abstract/Notes: The present paper proposes a method to isolate as much as possible the effects of the different educational innovations present in the Italian territory on the learning outcomes measured by the Invalsi National Surveys, to contribute to the debate on the effectiveness of such alternative approaches, such as “Avanguardie educative”, Montessori, “Senza Zaino”, “We Debate”, “Book in Progress”, etc. To illustrate the proposal, we take as an example the research that is taking place on Montessori teaching, in the framework of the PhD in Social & Developmental Psychology and Educational Research at Sapienza University of Rome. According to Cook, Campbell and Peracchio’s (1990) classification, the research design is a design with non-equivalent groups, with only post-tests,because there is no random assignment to experimental and control groups: the assignment takes place with the simple matching (precision control) method, which guarantees the greatest possible isolation of the effect of the independent variable, which keeps under control a) the effects of all the variables that we know affect dependent variables, and b) the effect of their interaction. The proposed method consists in five steps. The first step is about reconstructing the list of schools that follow a certain educational innovation. In the case of Montessori pedagogy, the list of 50 fifth primary classes active in Italy in 2013 and 2016 has been defined. The second step consists in reconstructing the school careers of the students attending the schools on the list. In the case of Montessori schools, for about half of the students of both cohorts, the number of years of Montessori school attended was defined through a meticulous collection of data from the secretariats of 12 Montessori schools in Italy. By this way, in addition to the experimental group of all those enrolled in the Montessori sections identified, there is an experimental group whose number of years of Montessori school attended is also known. The third step is about requesting, to the Statistical Office of Invalsi, the achievement in National Surveys of the students attending the list of identified classes. In the case of Montessori schools, on 24 November 2020 the list of sections and SIDI codes of students whose career was reconstructed was submitted, and between January and February 2021 the databases of the 2013 and 2016 National Surveys was returned, with the distinction between Montessori and non-Montessori students. The fourth step consists in defining the experimental group, made up in this case by the students who attended a Montessori school, and the control group, whose members are identified with the simple matching method (Bailey, 1982, p. 340). The last step consists in verifying, by ANOVA, any statistically significant differences between the distributions of the scores of the experimental groups and related control groups.

Language: English

Published: Milano, Italy: Franco Angeli, 2022

ISBN: 978-88-351-3917-1 88-351-3917-1

Conference Paper

Academic Achievement Outcomes: Montessori and Non-Montessori Public Elementary Students

Available from: Semantic Scholar

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Language: English

Conference Paper

Bringing out the best in your child: Achievement begins at home

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Language: English

Published: Boston, Massachusetts: AMI-USA, 2000

Pages: 75-80

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