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Doctoral Dissertation

Navigating the social/cultural politics of school choice: why do parents choose montessori? a case study

Available from: University North Carolina Greensboro

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Abstract/Notes: a "The underlying motives of school choice emerged as major courses of action to offer parents opportunities for education in the free market enterprise and to limit the racial desegregation of public schools. This policy became known as "freedom of choice." Historically, parental choice of schools was the option of parents who could afford the tuition of private or parochial schools. The first options for public school choice appeared during the 1960's. Today, magnet schools are the most popular form of school choice. Montessori schools have become a well-liked preference of magnet school options. Fifteen years ago, there were approximately 50 public Montessori schools in the United States. Today, there are between 250 and 300 public Montessori schools. While research has been accumulating on why parents choose a particular type of school (parochial, private, magnet, charter, or local public school) far less is known about why parents choose a particular curriculum. The purpose of this dissertation is to explore how parents navigate school choice decisions and why they choose Montessori schools over other available options. This dissertation further examines if parents' educational choices correspond to their reasons for selecting Montessori schooling and the impact family income and ethnicity have on their preference for Montessori. The methodology of this study utilized a mixed methods research medium. The mixed methods approach blended two different research strategies, qualitative and quantitative. Recognizing the overlap between qualitative and quantitative research methods, the data from self-report surveys were supplemented with semi-structured interviews. Three hundred surveys were distributed to the parents of the Montessori school and interviews were held with ten parents of the same school. Of the original 300 surveys, 132 were returned and comprised my final sample. The quantitative findings indicate that parents who choose the Montessori school use... OCLC Record: 866942318

Language: English

Published: Greensboro, North Carolina, 2007

Book

The Power of Conscious Parenting: With a Bibliography for Montessori Parenting

Bibliographies, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Includes 2 essays: "The Power of Conscious Parenting - Interconnecting Home and School" (by Marianne White Dunlap) and "Bibliography for Montessori Parenting" (by Jean K. Miller)

Language: English

Published: Rochester, New York: AMI/USA, 2011

Series: Parenting for a New World: A Collection of Essays

Article

To What Extent Do Parents of Montessori-Educated Children “Do Montessori” at Home? Preliminary Findings and Future Directions

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 14-24

Americas, Montessori method of education, North America, Parents - Attitudes, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Few, if any, empirical studies have explicitly examined the home environments of Montessori-educated children, and specifically whether or not Montessori parents reinforce or undermine their children’s Montessori education at home. With a sample of 30 parents of Montessori-educated toddlers and preschoolers attending a private Montessori school in the Midwest, this cross-sectional study examined Montessori parents’ knowledge of Montessori methods and their parenting beliefs and behaviors at home. Results suggested that Montessori parents from the targeted school were knowledgeable about and valued Montessori methods, even though few had a Montessori education themselves. Parents in this sample varied in their parenting behaviors and choices at home, with some parents who intentionally reinforced Montessori principles and others whose behaviors were inconsistent with a Montessori approach. Findings from this preliminary study provide a first glimpse into the beliefs and behaviors of Montessori parents from which future studies can build upon. Montessori educators and administrators will benefit from future research involving Montessori parents, particularly for those who offer Montessori-based parent education sessions to the families they serve.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i1.6737

ISSN: 2378-3923

Doctoral Dissertation

Measuring Parent Perception and Understanding of Montessori Education in Three Massachusetts Montessori Schools

Available from: University of Pepperdine

Americas, Montessori schools, North America, Parents - Perceptions, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori method is a comprehensive, child-centered, developmentalist philosophy of education developed by Dr. Maria Montessori in Rome, Italy, in the early 1900s. The Montessori method differs from traditional approaches to education, and has had limited exposure in the U.S. until the last 20 years. Despite this growth, little research data exists on the effectiveness of the method or of parent understanding of the method. This research project attempted to determine parent understanding of the Montessori method of education at three Montessori schools in Massachusetts that educate children from toddlers to grade 8. The objective of the research was to design, implement, and analyze a survey that measured parent understanding of the Montessori principles and classroom practices. The survey was developed using the Montessori principles as the foundation. The goal was to determine both the extent of parent understanding of the Montessori principles and parent perception of how these principles are carried out in the Montessori classroom. Parents and guardians were asked a total of 10 questions, 7 of which were five-point Likert scales. The quantitative questions specifically addressed the six Montessori principles and were designed to test parents’ overall understanding of each principle. Responses ranged from a principle being not at all important to very important. The qualitative portion of the survey instrument utilized three open-ended, self-completed questions designed to reveal a range of parent perceptions about Montessori education and classroom practices. The surveys revealed that parent values and thinking do line up with some aspects of the Montessori method and philosophy. The surveys also revealed that parents seem to value classroom practices contrary to the founding principles. What parents value and what parents think about regarding concepts such as goal setting, achievement, competition with peers, and teachers preparing and presenting lessons is in direct contrast with some of the Montessori founding principles and intentions. If Montessori schools wish to remain viable, they will need to reconcile the Montessori principles with conflicting parent values and, further, determine how to better align their principles with parent views and desires for their children.

Language: English

Published: Malibu, California, 2015

Thesis

A Study of Parents’ Views and Choices Towards the Montessori Method

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Abstract/Notes: Dr. Maria Montessori established the Montessori Method in the early 1900s. Her first book ‘The Montessori Method’ was translated into English in 1912 and has since become a globally recognised form of education (Isaacs, 2012). This paper concentrates on the parents’ views and choices towards the Montessori Method as this particular subject remains largely unstudied, especially within the UK. The author of this thesis is qualified in Montessori early years practice and therefore has a personal interest in gaining an insight into the parents’ point of view. The thesis identifies and analyses the key aspects of the philosophy and curriculum within the Montessori Method. This was achieved by studying Dr. Montessori’s original ideas and recent supportive or critical reviews. To gain the perspective of the parents, questionnaires were designed to elicit answers to the following questions: What are the parent’s views of the Montessori Method? Do parents understand the Montessori Philosophy?; Do parents choose a nursery because it is using the Montessori Method? The study was conducted within two private Montessori Nursery schools: N:B and N:A. The questionnaire had a Likert 5 scale design, consisting of 16 questions and 1 open question giving the option of additional comments. 40 questionnaires were distributed in each setting. The response rate was: N:B: 23 (57.49%): and N:A: 16 (40%), with a total sample size of 39. The Likert scale results were processed into graphs and the displayed numerically. Additionally 26 participants provided extra information in the optional section, the results of which were organised into a graph of the five recurrent themes together with illustrative quotes. The results showed that even though the majority of the parents chose their nursery because it was using the Montessori Method and agreed with the philosophy, only a minority actually demonstrated a level of understanding of the method. The conclusion was that parents thought they know what Montessori education was but actually their understanding was superficial. The implication of this finding is that parents express a willingness to support the Montessori Method and Practitioners need to provide more information for them. However, the study was restricted due to the quantitative design of the questionnaire and the lack of academic sources to support findings. Parents’ participation was willingly given, suggesting further study in this area to be feasible.

Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Tibetanization Project: Teachers' Meanings and Perspectives

Available from: University of Virginia

Asia, Displaced communities, India, Refugees, South Asia, Tibet

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigates meanings and perspectives of Tibetan elementary school teachers with regard to Tibetan medium education termed as the Tibetanization Project. It is a qualitative study in which assertions were generated based on common themes that emerged from the participating teachers' shared perspectives. The research questions that guided this study were: (a) What does Tibetanization mean to teachers in Tibetan Children's Village (TCV) schools in India? (b) How has the Tibetanization Project changed the instructional methods of teachers? (c) Has the Tibetanization Project made education more relevant for the Tibetan children? If so, how? If not, why not? (d) How do teachers perceive the Tibetan language and cultural acquisition among the children under the Tibetanization Project? and (e) How does Tibetan medium education affect the Tibetan people in exile? As a result of the research carried out: (1) The Tibetan teachers believe that although teaching of English as a subject is important, instruction solely in a foreign language at the primary school level can deter complete understanding of important concepts, and hinder acquisition of both languages, native and foreign. (2) In order to preserve the Tibetan language and give a quality education to Tibetan children, it is imperative to use the mother tongue as the medium of instruction at the primary school level. (3) The Tibetanization Project has encouraged active participation, critical thinking, and problem solving skills among Tibetan refugee students. (4) The Tibetanization Project has enriched Tibetan vocabulary both Tibetan teachers and students of elementary schools. (5) In spite of the above mentioned benefits, teachers still doubt the practicality of the Tibetanization Project in exile. (6) Teachers believe that a Tibetan medium education would be more practical if Tibet was a free country, but because that Tibetans live in exile, education in English medium is more vital for a successful life.

Language: English

Published: Charlottesville, Virginia, 2001

Article

The Montessori Educational Method: Communication and Collaboration of Teachers with the Child

Available from: Participatory Educational Research

Publication: Participatory Educational Research, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 443-462

, Females

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori learning environments, described as prepared environment, allow children to choose their work freely and construct their own learning. Because the child is in the center and the roles of the teacher differ from the roles of the teachers in traditional schools, the direction of the communication and collaboration between the child and the teacher is determined accordingly. This study aims at examining the practices of Montessori teachers in communication and collaboration with the child. A phenomenological approach was adopted in the study. Purposive snowball sampling was employed to identify 12 Montessori preschool teachers. A focus group interview and semi-structured interviews were used to obtain data. The obtained data were transcribed and analyzed through the content analysis method. The findings were examined under three main themes, which are "the communication of the teacher with the child", "the collaboration between the teacher and the child" and "the difficulties Montessori teachers face in communication and collaboration with the child". The study showed that teachers' communication approach was based on respect for the child. When communicating with the child, teachers adopted a guidance role. However, teachers' practices in communication deviated from Montessori philosophy in case of conflict and undesired behaviors. Support from the child's peers, involving the children in forming class rules, giving children responsibility, and collaboration in learning were the main subjects that maintain collaboration with the child. Besides, study findings indicated that Montessori teachers faced some difficulties in communication and collaboration with the child. The results of this study imply that the communication and collaboration practices of Montessori teachers and the Montessori philosophy are mostly in line but can contradict in some cases.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17275/per.22.24.9.1

ISSN: 2148-6123

Article

AMS Teacher Education Scholarships

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 3

Pages: 25-26

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Applications-typically about 100 per cycle-are reviewed by a small AMS selection committee, under the leadership of the chair of the Teachers Section of the AMS Board of Directors-currently Suzanne Bayer.Since the scholarship program began in 1993, AMS has awarded over $587,000 to more than 300 aspiring teachers.Sarah Chase (Early Childhood), Northeast Montessori Institute, Wenham, MA **Cristal Garza (Early Childhood), Montessori Teacher Academy, Dana Point, CA *Abigail Goeller (Early Childhood), Adrian Dominican Montessori Teacher Education Institute, Adrian, MI Elizabeth Hill (Elementary I-II), Institute for Montessori Innovation at Westminster College, Salt Lake City, UT Lisa Huff (Early Childhood), Greater Cincinnati Center for Montessori Education, Covington, KY *Ada Kulbickaite (Elementary III), Duhovka Montessori Teacher Education Program, Prague 6, Czech Republic Estefanía Maldonada (Early Childhood), Palm Harbor Montessori Teacher Education Center, Palm Harbor, FL *Jessica Marshall (Elementary I), Montessori Education Center of the Rockies, Boulder, CO Erin Mergil (Early Childhood), Center for Montessori Education I NY, New Rochelle, NY Shawnnee Miranda (Early Childhood), New England Montessori Teacher Education Center, Newton, MA *Rebekah Moore (Early Childhood), Greater Cincinnati Center for Montessori Education, Covington, KY Leah Park (Elementary I), Institute for Advanced Montessori Studies, Silver Spring, MD Misty Pasco (Infant and Toddler), Mid-America Montessori Teacher Training Institute, Omaha, NE *Stephanie Powell (Early Childhood), Montessori Center for Teacher Education, San Diego, CA *Kimberly Torres (Elementary I-II), Institute for Montessori Innovation at Westminster College, Salt Lake City, UT Mariah White (Elementary I), University of Wisconsin-River Falls Montessori Teacher Education Program, River Falls, WI Ashley Wooten (Early Childhood), Shelton Montessori Teacher Education Center, Dallas, TX Marah Zabibi (Early Childhood), Hope Montessori Educational Institute, Lake Saint Louis, MO *Scholarships partially funded from the Zell Family Scholarship Fund **Scholarship funded by the Joanne P. Hammes Scholarship Fund Scholarships were drawn from three sources, all administered by AMS: the AMS Living Legacy Scholarship Fund, for which monies were raised in honor of the 2016 Living Legacy, Carolyn Kambich; the Zell Family Scholarship Fund, established by Dr. Pamela Zell Rigg to honor the memory of her late mother, Agnes Kister, and her late brother, John Kister Zell; and the Joanne P. Hammes Scholarship Fund, established by an anonymous donor to honor Ms. Hammes' lifelong work as a Montessori educator.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

AMS Awards Teacher Education Scholarships

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 3

Pages: 17

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Abstract/Notes: Applications-usually about 100 per cycle-are reviewed by a small AMS work group, under the leadership of the AMS Board of Directors Teachers Section chair (currently Suzanne Bayer).Since the program's inception, AMS has awarded over $550,000 to more than 200 aspiring teachers.MARYAM BEIRAMI (Early Childhood), Institute for Advanced Montessori Studies, Silver Spring, MD SARAH BROWN (Elementary I), Montessori Education Center of the Rockies, Boulder, CO SAXON BROWN (Early Childhood), Hope Montessori Educational Institute, Lake St. Louis, MO NEUS CARMONA SAUS (Early Childhood), New England Montessori Teacher Education Center, Goffstown, NH SARAH GALLEY (Early Childhood), Center for Montessori Teacher Education/NC, Angier, NC MONICA GUCWA (Elementary I), Montessori Education Center of the Rockies, Boulder, CO *KRISTINE HABELMANN (Elementary I), Montessori Education Center of the Rockies, Boulder, CO MOLLY HARDY (Early Childhood), New England Montessori Teacher Education Center, Goffstown, NH **DANIELLE HINES (Infant & Toddler), Virginia Center for Montessori Studies, Richmond, VA KAYLA IANNUZZO (Early Childhood), Summit Montessori Teacher Training Institute, Davie, FL FARZANA KHAN (Early Childhood), Dallas Montessori Teacher Education Program, Dallas, TX DEEPIKA KOTTE GANGODA THALAPITIGODAGE (Early Childhood), Midwest Montessori Teacher Training Center, Libertyville, IL CHRISTINA KRENICKI (Early Childhood), Northeast Montessori Institute, Warren, ME LAUREN LUND (Secondary I-II), Cincinnati Montessori Secondary Teacher Education Program, Cincinnati, OH KYLEE MEYER (Early Childhood), Center for Montessori Education/NY, White Plains, NY EILYS ORTA (Infant & Toddler), Village Montessori Training Center, Miami, FL ALYNA PHETSINOR (Early Childhood), Midwest Montessori Teacher Training Center, Libertyville, IL ELISABETH ROSOFF (Infant & Toddler), West Side Montessori School, New York, NY LISA SCHAD (Elementary I-II), Montessori Elementary Teacher Training Collaborative, Arlington TAYLOR WEBB (Early Childhood), Hope Montessori Educational Institute, Lake St. Louis, MO *Scholarship awarded is from the Zell Family Scholarship Fund. **Scholarship partially funded by the Joanne P. Hammes Scholarship Fund.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Examining Teacher Leader Self-Efficacy and the Impact of Time Management Skills

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This study sought to examine how time management skills would impact the self-efficacy of Teacher Leaders working in a teacher-led school model. The participants of the four-week study were three Teacher Leaders from two teacher-led primary Montessori schools in an urban area. The Teacher Leaders incorporated time management skills including time analysis, establishing goals, prioritization, and planning/scheduling.Data was collected on Teacher Leader productivity, distribution of time among teaching and administrative roles, self-efficacy, and time management behavior through pre- and post- questionnaires, daily to-do lists, and daily activity logs. The study concluded that although the results were not statistically significant, two out of three Teacher Leader’s productivity, time management behavior, and self-efficacy did improve over the course of the study. Further research is needed to determine how these time management skills impact Teacher Leader’s experienced stress, perceived productivity, and to further investigate how Teacher Leaders’ distribution of time among teaching and administrative roles impacts stress and self-efficacy. (Note: The St. Catherine University website has the incorrect title associated with this thesis. The correct title is displayed in the PDF of the thesis.)

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

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