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961 results

Article

Sometimes You Just Have to Polish the Duck: Lessons for Grownups from a Montessori Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 1

Pages: 52-53

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Sometimes You Just Have to Polish the Duck: Lessons for Grownups from a Montessori Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 15, no. 4

Pages: 12–13

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Joy in the Montessori Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 3

Pages: 44-45

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author states that it is a delight to walk into a Montessori classroom to the hum of children engaged in a variety of activities, especially when there is an accompanying feeling of joy and happiness. In desiring the peaceful calm of the classroom, educators may inadvertently hinder the joy, enthusiasm, and imagination that are not only a part of childhood but something adults also would benefit from cultivating within themselves. Ulrich says that if one could step into the sparkly light-up sneakers of a 3-year-old, they would discover what a fascinating place the world is and that it is it is hard not to be excited! Educators are asked to step back for a moment to consider the perspective of the child--to consider allowing joy, enthusiasm, and imagination to be spontaneously expressed, while still maintaining the peace of the classroom. Gently, with joy, imagination, and creativity, as well as a large dose of humor, educators should embrace whatever life is delivering into the classroom and use it to flow right back into peace. In so doing, educators create a classroom where children and adults work together to maintain harmony and peacefulness.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Imaginary Play in Montessori Classrooms: Considerations for a Position Statement

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 24, no. 4

Pages: 28-35

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Abstract/Notes: Imaginary play activities are not only enjoyable in their own right, but also offer clear intellectual, social, and emotional benefits to children who participate in them. This article describes the nature of imaginary play as observed in some Montessori classrooms and lays the groundwork for developing a position statement on imaginary play for the early childhood years. In view of prevailing research supporting the importance of pretend play in the child's overall development, the stage is set for an interchange of ideas on whether Montessori's original proposal to align imagination with the elementary curriculum still holds true, or if the time has come to realize that pretend play has something to offer early childhood classrooms.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

'We Had to Be Sneaky!' Powerful Glimpses into Imaginary Expression in Montessori Classrooms

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 22, no. 4

Pages: 18-25

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines life in a Montessori classroom, with special attention focused on spontaneous episodes of imaginary play. The goal is to better understand what is going on when children engage in imaginary play and how this play assists young learners in their development. This article examines three play episodes, each from a different area of the classroom. A link is established between the value of play in young children's learning and development and the ways in which young children make sense of and experience play in a Montessori classroom. The results of this study suggest that imaginary play occurs as a social activity embedded within interactions with friends. In particular, as children depict imaginary worlds while dialoguing with the materials, they practice interpersonal cooperation and role-taking skills. Although superheroes and pop stars were not invited into a Montessori school, the children found surrogates to express their feelings and needs, and they looked to their classmates in these little scenarios for an endorsement of their ideas.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Honoring the Child with Dyslexia in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 21, no. 1

Pages: 36-40

Children with disabilities, Dyslexia, Dyslexic children, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: Speaking, listening, reading, and writing are all language activities. The human capacity for speaking and listening has a biological foundation: wherever there are people, there is spoken language. Acquiring spoken language is an unconscious activity, and, barring any physical deformity or language learning disability, like severe autism, all children listen and speak. In contrast, writing systems must be consciously learned. A child beginning to read and write has to discover what sound each symbol in the written code stands for and, in English, understand that the sound may change depending upon the placement within a word (i.e. circus or success). However, for 8 percent of the population, this process is remarkably difficult. Variable and often hereditary, this difficulty in acquiring and processing written language is called dyslexia, and it is manifested by a lack of proficiency in one or more of the processes of reading, spelling, or writing. Because dyslexia is a language-based disorder, it can be predicted from language development during the pre-reading stage. Classroom teachers of many pre-reading children can be at the forefront of identifying and helping the child with dyslexia before the disability diminishes that motivation, confidence, and love of learning that denote a Montessori child. Good teachers often just "know" that a child is developing atypically, but rarely is that enough to get the child the help she needs. Some simple screening procedures can provide data to show parents and other professionals and can lend confidence to a hunch. This article offers several screening activities for the classroom teacher.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Un Segundo Idioma en el Aula: Nos Estamos Perdiendo una Oportunidad? [A Second Language in the Classroom: Are We Missing the Boat?]

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 2

Pages: 38-40

Bilingualism

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Abstract/Notes: In recent years there has been greater emphasis placed on second language acquisition in schools. To be prepared for life in the 21st century, to function within an increasingly interdependent world society, to be free from the petty biases that hinder understanding and from the larger hatreds that lead to confrontation, children will need to acquire the basic tools of communication--including a working knowledge of other people's languages. Although early learning of another language is often viewed as exceptional and sometimes as undesirable, studies conducted around age-related issues find that children before the age of 7 tend to acquire second languages with great ease and fluency. Their older brothers and sisters, in traditional high school or college foreign language courses, seldom reach such communicative competence--even after 4 or 5 years of instruction. Research data, personal observation, and anecdotal information about children suggest encouragement of early second language introduction. This article discusses the benefits of introducing second language programs to young children.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

A Second Language in the Classroom: Are We Missing the Boat?

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 31–32

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Symmetry and Young Children: Observation and Analysis of Construction in a Montessori Early Childhood Classroom

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 13, no. 2

Pages: 42–48

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Peacemaking: Establishing the Potential for a Peaceful Society by Achieving Community in the Elementary Classroom

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 32–39

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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