Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

878 results

Article

Children and Community Life

Available from: Internet Archive

Publication: The Western Comrade, vol. 3, no. 2

Pages: 15-19

Americas, Llano del Rio Colony, Montessori method of education, North America, North America, United States of America

See More

Language: English

Article

The House of Children: Lecture, Kodaikanal, 1944

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 38, no. 1

Pages: 11-19

Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Maria Montessori - Writings, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

See More

Abstract/Notes: This article vividly describes the indoor and outdoor components of what Montessori calls Home Sweet Home. Her vision of a domestic Children's House contains many facets: rooms of varied space, beautiful flooring, gardens that educate and evoke collaboration, and places for year-round exercise. This is a definitive yet rare Montessori article that shows the profound overlap of both natural and man-made spaces in a house designed for children. [Copyright © 1944 Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company. NAMTA would like to express its gratitude to the Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company and the Maria Montessori Archives held at AMI for suggesting this lecture and making it available.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

An fMRI study of error monitoring in Montessori and traditionally-schooled children

Available from: npj Science of Learning

Publication: npj Science of Learning, vol. 5

Pages: Article 11

Neuroscience

See More

Abstract/Notes: The development of error monitoring is central to learning and academic achievement. However, few studies exist on the neural correlates of children’s error monitoring, and no studies have examined its susceptibility to educational influences. Pedagogical methods differ on how they teach children to learn from errors. Here, 32 students (aged 8–12 years) from high-quality Swiss traditional or Montessori schools performed a math task with feedback during fMRI. Although the groups’ accuracies were similar, Montessori students skipped fewer trials, responded faster and showed more neural activity in right parietal and frontal regions involved in math processing. While traditionally-schooled students showed greater functional connectivity between the ACC, involved in error monitoring, and hippocampus following correct trials, Montessori students showed greater functional connectivity between the ACC and frontal regions following incorrect trials. The findings suggest that pedagogical experience influences the development of error monitoring and its neural correlates, with implications for neurodevelopment and education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1038/s41539-020-0069-6

ISSN: 2056-7936

Article

Montessori for All Children

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 2

Pages: 9

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities

See More

Abstract/Notes: For Montessori schools, the percentage of children with learning needs that require specific attention may be even greater due to Montessori's individualized programs, nurturing teachers, and emphasis on emotional intelligence as well as academic progress.[...]many teacher education programs do not include instruction on working with children who have learning and/ or behavioral differences.In Montessori's era, the children with special needs with whom she worked were called "defective" Today, with the individualized Montessori approach and a master teacher, these children should be perceived as talented and creative in their own right.[...]many teacher education programs do not include instruction on working with children who have learning and/or behavioral differences.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Free the Children

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 83

Pages: 18–19

See More

Abstract/Notes: Adopt a Village program

Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Tragedy: How Two Schools Coped [Homewood Montessori, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Children's Montessori House, Traverse City, Michigan]

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 18, no. 1

Pages: 1, 14

Public Montessori

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

How to Start the Silence Game with Quite New Children

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1967, no. 4

Pages: 23–26

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Report

Ancona Montessori Research Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children. Final Report

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Americas, Cognitive development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Elementary school students, Longitudinal studies, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: This is the final report of the Ancona Montessori Research Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children begun in 1965 to investigate the effects of a modified Montessori program for disadvantaged children in the preschool and early elementary years. This report deals with the academic year 1969-1970, in which 29 disadvantaged children and a comparable group of 29 middle class children are the central focus of study. In addition, there is a followup on the school careers of disadvantaged children who attended Ancona at one time. A number of hypotheses about the potential effects of the project on the children's cognitive, social development are studied. Part I of the report deals with findings relative to the nursery school children, and includes a discussion of data from three measures of intellectual development (Stanford Binet, WPPSI and Merrill-Palmer) and from tester and teacher ratings of school-related behaviors and attitudes and social interaction. Part II details findings on the elementary school children and followup data on children who attended Ancona in previous years but are now elementary school students in other schools. In addition, data regarding children whose families have had long term involvement in the school is discussed. The appendix includes Ancona school Head Start program ratings of behavior during individual intelligence testing. (MS)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., Aug 31, 1970

Advanced Search