Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

890 results

Article

The Slow Movement: A Need for a Holistic Approach in Primary Education

Available from: Research Gate

Publication: International Montessori Institute Working Paper Series, no. 2022-4

Pages: 46-52

See More

Language: English

Article

Discovering the Montessori Approach: Improving Equity in Mainstream Primary Schools

Available from: Research Gate

Publication: International Montessori Institute Working Paper Series, no. 2022-4

Pages: 53-58

See More

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Unveiling Alternative Schools: A Systematic Review of Cognitive and Social-Emotional Development in Different Educational Approaches

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Children and Youth Services Review, vol. 158

Pages: Article 107480

Alternative education, Child development, Cognitive development, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Reggio Emilia approach (Early childhood education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Social emotional learning, Waldorf method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

See More

Abstract/Notes: Alternative schools such as Montessori, Reggio Emilia or Waldorf emerged on the educational scene over a century ago but have proliferated internationally in the last 15-20 years. In addition to being considered as educational alternatives to conventional approaches, these schools are often associated with enhanced benefits in cognitive, social, emotional, and personal development of attending children. This assumption stems from the fact that these approaches are aligned with the basic principles of child development, especially because in these schools, daily practices are organized according to children's developmental strengths and considering individual learning rhythms. However, empirical research on this assumption is scarce and little is known about the type of schools studied and the aspects of development analyzed. Thus, this systematic review aims to address two objectives: to identify which types of alternative schools have captured the interest of researchers and to explore the most studied areas of cognitive and socioemotional development during childhood, along with the main findings. The review includes studies conducted in the last decade that compare the effects of attending alternative schools versus conventional preschools, elementary schools, or high schools. Twenty-four articles were included, most of them focused on Montessori and, to a lesser extent, Waldorf schools. Other types of alternative schools (democratic, Freinet) had limited representation. Executive function, creativity and academic achievement have received more attention in research compared to well-being, social competence, or independence. Overall, the results show a better performance in children from alternative schools or no differences with their counterparts in conventional schools. However, this study provides a critical perspective on these findings, highlighting limitations that should be considered when interpreting them and guiding future research endeavors.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2024.107480

ISSN: 0190-7409

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

A Spotlight on Adaptation: Preimplementation of Montessori-Based Approaches in VA Long-Term Care

Available from: Oxford Academic

Publication: Innovation in Aging, vol. 7, no. Supplement 1

Pages: 343

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori-based interventions

See More

Abstract/Notes: Effectively adapting evidence-based interventions for nursing home (NH) implementation is a critical, yet under-examined, component of improving care quality. Montessori-based activity programming (MAP) is an evidence-based intervention that promotes person-centered care, engages persons living with dementia, and mitigates distress behaviors. Currently, there is sparse examination of MAP in Department of Veterans Affairs NHs (i.e., Community Living Centers, CLCs). We report on the use of the Framework for Reporting Adaptations and Modifications-Enhanced (FRAME) to track adaptations made to MAP – providing a pre-implementation exemplar for NH clinicians and implementation scientists. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected across two phases (i.e., pre-implementation and pilot implementation) at eight VA CLCs between 2017-2019. We used an iterative, rapid content analytic approach to triangulate findings across data sources (e.g., advisory panel, staff interviews, training evaluations, field notes, fidelity assessments) and identify needed adaptations for the CLC setting and population. More than 300 frontline VA CLC staff participated in qualitative interviews and/or provided feedback on quantitative staff training. Thirty-six adaptations were made. Most adaptions occurred during the pre-implementation phase, were reactive, focused on training/evaluation, and involved researchers, intervention developers, and practitioners. All were fidelity-consistent with MAP. The most common goal across adaptations was increased reach/engagement of the intervention. CLCs and community NHs can use findings to support intervention adaptation, and adapt and implement MAP to improve meaningful engagement for persons living with dementia and other residents. Future research should further evaluate and standardize FRAME for diverse users of complex interventions.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1093/geroni/igad104.1142

ISSN: 2399-5300

Book

Montessori Education: A Humanistic Approach for the 1990s

Available from: ERIC

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study identifies philosophical and instructional values implicit in the educational thought of Maria Montessori and compares those values with Shapiro's (1986, 1987) set of humanistic value principles. Shapiro's 16 value principles, which are derived from an analysis of 100 works of 89 well-known writers who have been publicly associated with humanistic education, concern: (1) a process orientation; (2) self-determination; (3) interpersonal connectedness; (4) personal relevance; (5) integration of affect and cognition in a holistic approach; (6) consideration of context; (7) an affective, experiential bias; (8) innovation; (9) democratic participation; (10) orientation toward personal growth; (11) orientation toward the intrinsic value of persons; (12) individualism; (13) reality as concrete and pragmatic; (14) formative over summative evaluation; (15) encouragement of diversity and creativity; and (16) the cultivation of spiritual potential. A content analysis of Montessori's highly philosophical book, "The Secret of Childhood," yielded 156 value statements that were sorted using Shapiro's 16 value principles. Results demonstrate extensive similarity between Montessori's values and the values of humanistic educators. Each area of similarity is discussed.

Language: English

Published: California: [s.n.], 1987

Doctoral Dissertation

Individualization, differentiation, and personalization in mathematics in the Czech Republic through three different approaches: Scheme-oriented, Child-centred, and Undesignated / Individualizace, diferenciace a personalizace ve třech přístupech vyučování matematice na 1. stupni ZŠ v České republice - metoda budování schémat, pedocentricky orientovaná metodaa nevyhraněná metoda

Available from: Charles University Digital Repository (Czechia)

Comparative education, Czech Republic, Czechia, Eastern Europe, Europe, Mathematics education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

See More

Abstract/Notes: The goal of the presented work was to determine whether and how individualization, differentiation, and personalization are utilized in the principles of the selected programs and in the teachers’ beliefs and practices in the teaching of mathematics at elementary school. In order to collect data, six teachers in the Czech Republic were selected with three different approaches to teaching– Scheme oriented approach, child–centred educational approach, and an undesignated mainstream approach. The basic concepts and all three selected approaches to teaching were defined in the theoretical part of the work. In the experimental part, episodes from interviews about beliefs and practices identified in teaching were interpreted within the context of characteristics of individualization, differentiation, and personalization. Practices such as the use of textbooks and homework assignments were specifically described. The study shows that teachers of a scheme-oriented approach and a child–centred educational approach use elements of individualization, differentiation, and personalization in their practices. Individualization appears in the teaching of the undesignated mainstream approach, but this approach does not contain aspects of differentiation and personalization. The analysis in all monitored areas of selected teachers indicates which of the characteristics prevail in individual teachers’ work and the approaches. The research confirmed that selected teachers in all three approaches (Hejny method, Montessori method and an undesignated) individualize, differentiate, or personalize to some extent. / Cílem předkládané práce bylo popsat, zda a jak jsou uplatňována individualizace, diferenciace a personalizace ve vybraných programech, jejich principech, učitelských přesvědčeních a praktikách ve výuce matematiky na prvním stupni základní školy. Za účelem sběru dat bylo vybráno šest učitelů se třemi odlišnými přístupy k výuce – výuka orientovaná na budování schémat, pedocentricky orientovaná metoda a nevyhraněný přístup hlavního vzdělávacího proudu v České republice. V teoretické části práce byly definovány základní pojmy a vymezeny všechny tři vybrané přístupy k výuce. V experimentální části byly na pozadí charakteristik individualizace, diferenciace a personalizace interpretovány epizody z rozhovorů o přesvědčeních a praktikách sledovaných při výuce. Z praktik bylo konkrétně popsáno užití učebnic a zadávání domácích úkolů. Ukázalo se, že učitelé ve výuce orientované na budování schémat i učitelé pedocentricky orientované metody využívají při výuce prvky individualizace, diferenciace i personalizace. U učitelů v nevyhraněném přístupu hlavního proudu se objevuje individualizace. Analýza ve všech sledovaných oblastech u vybraných učitelů naznačuje, které z charakteristik převažují u jednotlivých učitelů a přístupů (v Hejného metodě, montessoriovské metodě a nevyhraněném přístupu).

Language: English

Published: Prague, Czechia, 2023

Article

Making Converts; Montessori: A Modern Approach [review]

Available from: The Times Educational Supplement Historical Archive - Gale

Publication: The Times Educational Supplement (London, England)

Pages: 20

Book reviews

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0040-7887

Article

More Flexible Approach to Reading Mooted

Available from: The Times Educational Supplement Historical Archive - Gale

Publication: The Times Educational Supplement (London, England)

Pages: 17

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0040-7887

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori Elder and Dementia Care, and Trauma-Informed Approaches: A Thematic Analysis Examining Connections Between the Models

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 66-79

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

See More

Abstract/Notes: According to the World Health Organization, there are currently more than 55 million people living with dementia worldwide, and this figure is expected to triple by 2050. Recent studies suggest that there may be a link between childhood trauma (which refers to exposure to overwhelmingly stressful experiences before the age of 18 years) and the onset of dementia in later life. Therefore, in communities caring for persons living with dementia, some residents may have been exposed to trauma in childhood. Currently, there is an increasing awareness of the negative impact of childhood trauma on later adult health and well-being, and a corresponding recognition of the need for services, including for dementia care, to be trauma-informed. In the last decade, the Montessori Method has become established as a legitimate approach to elder/dementia care. However, it has not yet been examined as a trauma-informed approach. The aim of this paper is to address that gap by (a) highlighting how Maria Montessori took steps to integrate interdisciplinary knowledge of trauma into her Method when she began to understand the potential of childhood trauma to adversely impact adult health and well-being, and (b) outlining how the Montessori Method, when applied to dementia care, incorporates many of the core principles of trauma-informed practice. This paper concludes that the Montessori Method for dementia care has the built-in capacity to be trauma-sensitive and trauma-responsive, but that its ongoing rollout should follow Montessori’s lead by specifically integrating knowledge about the neurobiology of trauma into its training programs.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v9i2.19480

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Approaching Holidays Equitably in a Montessori Setting

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 33, no. 3

Pages: 40-50

American Montessori Society (AMS) - Periodicals

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Advanced Search