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398 results

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Songs on Hmong Vocabulary Acquisition

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Americas, Bilingualism, Displaced communities, Hmong (Asian people), Hmong American children, Hmong American families, Hmong songs, Immigrants, Language acquisition, North America, Refugees

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Abstract/Notes: This action research assessed the effects of singing a song to learn language in a bilingual classroom. The research took place at a bilingual Hmong-English Montessori preschool program. 28 preschool-aged children participated in the research which was conducted over five weeks. Data sources included a parent questionnaire, vocabulary pre-test, vocabulary post-test with a follow-up conversation, daily observation logs, and tally sheet. The children were taught 16 Hmong vocabulary words with half the words sung to the tune of a common children’s song and the other half by simple reciting. The results from the vocabulary post-test showed that there was an increase in the children’s ability to recall Hmong vocabulary taught through the song and the follow-up conversation showed that the children enjoyed learning by singing. Further research could examine the continued use of singing vocabulary to common children’s songs and its effects on language learning in the long-term.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Doctoral Dissertation

Utilizing Montessori-Based Occupational Therapy Interventions for People with Dementia

Available from: St. Catherine University

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Method for dementia is a specific approach to dementia care that can be implemented as an alternative to pharmaceutical intervention with its focus on purposeful and meaningful doing. Montessori-based interventions that were found effective in increasing self-feeding for people with dementia included activities requiring hand-eye coordination, scooping, pouring and squeezing. For this project, there were five participants from a residential care facility. This study consisted of doing activities or exercises to simulate eating right before mealtime. This occurred three times per week for eight weeks. The broad long-term purpose of this project was to increase participation in the daily occupation of self-feeding for people with dementia in residential care facilities. Montessori-based occupational therapy interventions could provide caregivers with an evidence-based strategy to deal with eating difficulties of people with dementia.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

Article

Approaches to engaging people with dementia in meaningful occupations in institutional settings: A scoping review

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 28, no. 5

Pages: 329-347

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Background People with dementia in institutional settings lack engagement in meaningful occupations, which may cause decreased quality of life. Although many researchers and professionals have proposed approaches to engage people with dementia in these occupations, an overview seems to be missing. Aim This scoping review provides an overview by categorizing and describing the characteristics of the approaches. Material and method A thorough literature search in nine databases identified the studies on approaches. We included 54 studies, and extracted bibliometric data. A content analysis revealed the characteristics of the approaches. Results Four categories of approaches were uncovered. First, the literature defined the concept of meaningful occupation in various ways. Second, a category of approaches provided theoretical knowledge of meaningful occupations. The third category focussed on specific themes, such as certain methods. The final described comprehensive multilevel approaches. Conclusion This review contributes to knowledge of the diversity of approaches to engage people with dementia in meaningful occupation within institutional settings. Significance We suggest that occupational therapy researchers and practitioners consider how the concept of meaningful occupation is embedded in the theoretical landscape. Furthermore, activity programming requires reflexive decision-making at the policy and practice level, as engagement in meaningful occupations is complex.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/11038128.2020.1791952

ISSN: 1103-8128

Article

Effects of a Culturally Adapted Group-Based Montessori-Based Activities on Engagement and Affect in Chinese Older People with Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: BMC Geriatrics, vol. 21, no. 1

Pages: Article 24

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, China, Dementia, East Asia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Method underpinned by the principle of person-centered care has been widely adopted to design activities for people with dementia. However, the methodological quality of the existing evidence is fair. The objectives of this study are to examine the feasibility and effects of a culturally adapted group-based Montessori Method for Dementia program in Chinese community on engagement and affect in community-dwelling people with dementia.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1186/s12877-020-01967-0

ISSN: 1471-2318

Book

The Montessori Method for Connecting to People with Dementia: A Creative Guide to Communication and Engagement in Dementia Care

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Creative activities can support people with dementia, leading to moments of reconnection and joy. This book shows how the Montessori method - with its arts-based, person-centred and positive focus - can help caregivers connect to people with dementia. Drawing on 20 years of experience, Tom and Karen Brenner explain the philosophy of the Montessori method, provide clearly-written steps to follow when applying it, and share a wealth of case studies and stories from their personal work using this method with people with dementia. This includes reading circles, art programmes, drum circles, poetry, and video diaries. Supported by research of the importance of creativity and the arts in dementia care, it is made clear throughout how every aspect of the Montessori method can help those with dementia to rediscover the world around them, maximising the opportunities they have to reconnect with their peers, family, friends, and support staff.

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-78592-813-0 978-1-78450-873-9 1-78450-873-X

Article

Different Places, People, Experiences

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 37

Pages: 9

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: importance of adults outside the family

Language: English

Article

The Totonaca People and the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 24, no. 2

Pages: 39-46

Americas, Catechesis of the Good Shepherd, Central America, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico, Montessori method of education, Religious education

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Abstract/Notes: Illustrates how the spread of the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd in work with the Totonaca people of the Mexican states of Veracruz and Puebla indicates the universality of Montessori pedagogical principles and the power of the parable method of teaching within a culture with a strong oral tradition. (Author/KB)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Book Section

Die Haltung der Weltgesundheitsbehörde (WHO) gegenüber Behinderten [The World Health Organization's (WHO) Attitude Towards Disabled People]

Book Title: Die Montessori-Pädagogik und das behinderte Kind: Referate und Ergebnisse des 18. Internationalen Montessori Kongresses (München, 4-8 Juli 1977) [Montessori Pedagogy and the Handicapped Child: Papers and Results of the 18th International Montessori Congress (Munich, July 4-8, 1977)]

Pages: 25-32

Children with disabilities, Conferences, International Montessori Congress (18th, Munich, Germany, 4-8 July 1977), People with disabilities, World Health Organization

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Language: German

Published: München: Kindler, 1978

ISBN: 3-463-00716-9

Article

Montessori Success for People Living with Dementia

Available from: Care Info

Publication: Journal of Dementia Care, vol. 19, no. 2

Pages: 36-38

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: This pilot project used Montessori principles to improve mealtimes of people with dementia. The four residents involved in the project were given six Montessori activities to carry out each day. The activities helped hand-eye coordination, levels of concentration and problem solving. This in turn had a positive impact on residents well-being during mealtimes.

Language: English

ISSN: 1351-8372

Article

Caring for People with Dementia in Residential Aged Care: Successes with a Composite Person-Centered Care Model Featuring Montessori-based Activities

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Geriatric Nursing, vol. 36, no. 2

Pages: 106-110

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori therapy, Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: Person-centered models of dementia care commonly merge aspects of existing models with additional influences from published and unpublished evidence and existing government policy. This study reports on the development and evaluation of one such composite model of person-centered dementia care, the ABLE model. The model was based on building the capacity and ability of residents living with dementia, using environmental changes, staff education and organizational and community engagement. Montessori principles were also used. The evaluation of the model employed mixed methods. Significant behavior changes were evident among residents of the dementia care Unit after the model was introduced, as were reductions in anti-psychotic and sedative medication. Staff reported increased knowledge about meeting the needs of people with dementia, and experienced organizational culture change that supported the ABLE model of care. Families were very satisfied with the changes.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.gerinurse.2014.11.003

ISSN: 0197-4572

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