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533 results

Conference Paper

Montessori and Responsive Environment Models: A Longitudinal Study of Two Preschool Programs, Phase Two

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New York, New York, April 4-8, 1977)

Academic achievement, Americas, Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Longitudinal studies, Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This study represents a continuation of a longitudinal assessment of the effectiveness of a Montessori and Responsive Environment preschool program sponsored by the Arlington Public Schools. The Metropolitan Readiness Test, the Caldwell Cooperative Preschool Inventory, and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test were used to assess the academic achievement and intellectual development of 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children with the Montessori or Responsive Environment experiences and those with no preschool experience at the end of the regular kindergarten program. The SRA Achievement Series, Grade 1, was used to assess the achievement of children, with and without the Montessori experience, at the end of first grade. Results indicated that children in the regular 5-year-old kindergarten program with prior Montessori experience scored significantly higher on the Caldwell measure than did children without this experience upon entrance into the program. When all of the children with either type of preschool experience were categorized as one treatment group, results showed that these children scored higher on the Caldwell measure at the beginning and end of the 5-year-old program than those without the experience. Significant differences in favor of the preschool treatment group were also noted on the pretest of the Caldwell subtests: Personal-Social, Associative, Vocabulary, and Concept Activation-Numerical. It was concluded that early educational preschool experiences can be effective in fostering the academic achievement and maintaining the intellectual development of children. (Author/JMB)

Language: English

Pages: 45

Report

Report of a Research and Demonstration Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children in the Ancona Montessori School

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Classroom environments, Early childhood education

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Abstract/Notes: A preschool experience was provided for lower-income negro children, and then their gains or losses in IQ and social integration were evaluated in terms of the type of the teaching method used. Thirty lower-income negro children and 17 middle-income negro and white children were separated into three groups and exposed to three teaching methods. Class one was unintegrated (all lower-income negro children) and non-Montessorial in methodology. It was the most unrestricted in terms of teacher control. Class two as integrated and non-Montessorial, but teacher control and restriction was more evident. Class three was integrated and Montessorial. The pupils here were the most disciplined and controlled. A thorough study was made of these classroom procedures, teaching techniques, and pupil activities. The results of the Stanford Binet intelligence tests showed no significant iq gain among the groups or within a group from test one at the beginning of the eight-week summer session to test two at the end of the session. But individual gains appeared. These were found to be an inverse function of distractibility. A winter pre-school session, with new pupils and using only the Montessori method, resulted in IQ gains. This was attributed to an improved classroom atmosphere. In general, the sessions did increase the children's readiness to begin school work and helped them to gain social confidence. Encouraging parental interest and participation was a collateral aspect of the programs. (WD)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 1966

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effects of a Culturally Adapted Group-Based Montessori-Based Activities on Engagement and Affect in Chinese Older People with Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: BMC Geriatrics, vol. 21, no. 1

Pages: Article 24

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, China, Dementia, East Asia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Method underpinned by the principle of person-centered care has been widely adopted to design activities for people with dementia. However, the methodological quality of the existing evidence is fair. The objectives of this study are to examine the feasibility and effects of a culturally adapted group-based Montessori Method for Dementia program in Chinese community on engagement and affect in community-dwelling people with dementia.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1186/s12877-020-01967-0

ISSN: 1471-2318

Book Section

From Montessori to Culturally Relevant Schools Under the Trees in Kenya

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: Common Characteristics and Unique Qualities in Preschool Programs: Global Perspectives in Early Childhood Education

Pages: 23-35

Africa, Culturally responsive teaching, East Africa, Kenya, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Kenya distinguishes itself from other sub-Saharan African countries with its well-established system of early childhood development and education (ECDE). This chapter describes environmental, economic and social-cultural circumstances in Kenya and how these affect ECDE program design, curriculum and preschool activities. The author will provide a brief historical overview of early childhood educational contexts in Kenya and how preschool teachers meet minimum standards of a quality program using Guidelines for Early Childhood Development in Kenya (NACECE (National Center for Early Childhood Education). (2003). Guidelines for early childhood development in Kenya. Nairobi: Author.) with an African approach. Specific focus will be given to the diverse and contrasting program settings for early childhood care and education from the affluent city suburbs to the rural agrarian farms and the arid and semi arid (ASAL) areas of Kenya.

Language: English

Published: Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer Netherlands, 2013

ISBN: 978-94-007-4972-6 978-94-007-4971-9

Series: Educating the Young Child

Book Section

Montessori with Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation of Some Research Findings

Book Title: Montessori Schools in America: Historical, Philosophical, and Empirical Research Perspectives

Pages: 153-162

African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article was originally published as an entry in Early Education, eds. R. D. Hess and R. M. Bear (Chicago: Aldine, 1968), p. 105-118.

Language: English

Published: Lexington, Massachusetts: Ginn Custom Pub., 1981

Edition: 1st ed.

ISBN: 0-536-03647-0

Book Section

Montessori with Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation of Some Research Findings

Book Title: Montessori Schools in America: Historical, Philosophical, and Empirical Research Perspectives

Pages: 169-180

African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article was originally published as an entry in Early Education, eds. R. D. Hess and R. M. Bear (Chicago: Aldine, 1968), p. 105-118.

Language: English

Published: Lexington, Massachusetts: Ginn Custom Pub., 1983

Edition: 2nd ed.

ISBN: 0-536-04367-1

Book Section

Montessori with Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation and Some Research Findings

Book Title: Early Education: Current Theory, Research, and Action

Pages: 105-118

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: Chicago: Aldine Pub. Co., 1968

Conference Paper

Culturally Relevant Education and the Montessori Approach: Perspectives from Hawaiian Educators

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, Apr 8, 2006)

Americas, Culturally responsive teaching, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, Apr 8, 2006). The purpose of this study was to investigate why some Hawaiian language and culture-based (HLCB) educators perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their goals and values and to determine the salient features of the Montessori approach used by HLCB teachers who received Montessori training. The sociocultural perspective on learning provided the theoretical foundations and grounded theory methodology guided the research process. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 40 HLCB participants, including 15 key informants who had at least 180 hours of Montessori training. Data also included classroom and school visits and analyses of school documents. Data analysis revealed six themes and two linkages that related the themes and their elements. Four themes were related to why HLCB educators have perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their values and goals. These were (a) similar views regarding their work as a lifestyle, (b) common pedagogical practices, (c) shared values and beliefs as educators, and (d) an overlapping world-view. One theme described the distinctions between the approaches. The final theme included challenges to implementing and maintaining HLCB programs. The findings suggest that researchers and teacher educators interested in culturally congruent education should take into account the underlying world-view of both the research paradigm and the participants involved, and that school reform should be comprehensive, culturally congruent, and generated from within communities and other stakeholders. They also indicate that culturally congruent, place-based education may enhance academic self-efficacy and could serve as a bridge between seemingly disparate educational approaches.

Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Culturally Congruent Education and the Montessori Model: Perspectives from Hawaiian Culture-based Educators

Available from: American Montessori Society

Americas, Culturally responsive teaching, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate why some Hawaiian language and culturebased (HLCB) educators perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their goals and values and to determine the salient features of the Montessori approach used by HLCB teachers who received Montessori training. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 40 HLCB participants, including 15 key informants who had at least 180 hours of Montessori training. Data also included classroom and school visits and analyses of school documents. Data analysis revealed six themes and two linkages that related the themes and their elements. Four themes were related to why HLCB educators have perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their values and goals. These were (a) similar views regarding their work as a lifestyle, (b) common pedagogical practices, (c) shared values and beliefs as educators, and (d) an overlapping world-view. One theme described the distinctions between the approaches. The final theme included challenges to implementing and maintaining HLCB programs. The findings suggest that researchers and teacher educators interested in culturally congruent education should take into account the underlying world-view of both the research paradigm and the participants involved, and that school reform should be comprehensive, culturally congruent, and generated from within communities and other stakeholders. They also indicate that culturally congruent, place-based education may enhance academic self-efficacy and could serve as a bridge between seemingly disparate educational approaches.

Language: English

Published: Manoa, Hawaii, 2006

Report

The Effects of Montessori Educational Techniques on Culturally Disadvantaged Head Start Children

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: To determine whether significant differences exist in skill performance as a result of head start experience and to determine whether these differences exist between two ethnic groups, 17 Anglo-American [White] and 62 Mexican American [Latino] culturally disadvantaged children were pre-tested and post-tested during the summer of 1965 in connection with six-week head start programs in Costa Mesa and Fullerton, California. Five teachers using modified Montessori materials stressed three developmental areas, (1) perceptual-motor, (2) social-emotional, and (3) intellectual-academic. Seven instruments were used to test the program's effectiveness--Gesell Maturation Index, Mateer Inversion Test, tests of dominance, teacher rating scale, Goodenough-Harris D-A-P, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, and wide range achievement test. Results showed that certain handicaps do exist among culturally disadvantaged children prior to school experience and that positive gains occurred when enrichment experiences were provided. Greatest gains were in the areas of intellectual-academic and social-emotional skills. Ethnic differences appeared in the linguistic skills limitations of the Mexican American children. Need for medical and dental attention was apparent in both groups. Future provision should be made for continued preschool education and wider dissemination of health services. (LG)

Language: English

Published: Fullerton, California, Sep 1965

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