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1133 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Master Gardener Classroom Garden Project: An Evaluation of the Benefits to Children

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Children's Environments, vol. 12, no. 2

Pages: 256-263

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Abstract/Notes: The Master Gardener Classroom Garden Project provides many inner-city children in the San Antonio Independent School District with an experiential way of learning about horticulture, gardening, themselves, and their relationships with their peers. To evaluate the benefits of participation in the Classroom Garden Project, data was collected on 52 second and third grade students. Qualitative interviews indicate that participation in the gardening project has had many positive effects on the school children. The children have gained pleasure from watching the products of their labor flourish, and have had the chance to increase interactions with their parents and other adults. In addition, the children have learned the anger and frustration that occur when things of value are harmed out of neglect or violence.

Language: English

ISSN: 2051-0780

Article

Observation and Self-Evaluation Tools

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1965-1973), vol. 7, no. 2

Pages: 18

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Juice Time: An Evaluation

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1965-1973), vol. 6, no. 3

Pages: 32-33

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Abstract/Notes: Reprint from v. 1, no. 2 (Mar 1966)

Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Juice Time: An Evaluation

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1965-1973), vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 18-19

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Abstract/Notes: Reprinted in v. 6, no. 3 (Winter 1970-1971): p. 32

Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

Teacher Evaluation Form

Publication: AMI Elementary Alumni Association Newsletter, vol. 10, no. 1

Pages: insert

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Language: English

Report

Preschool Reading Instruction: A Literature Search, Evaluation, and Interpretation. Final Report [volume 2 of 3]

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This report, Vol. II of three interpretive manuscripts, presents Information For The Teacher, a review of literature on preschool reading instruction, along with suggestions and materials for teaching preschool reading. A skills checklist is provided and the educational television program, Sesame Street, is evaluated, since the effectiveness of this medium has been both praised and questioned. Reading readiness and motivation are discussed. The latter portion of this report offers three Appendices: Appendix A is a Guide to Materials for Prereading Instruction, Appendix B lists Publishers of Reading Materials, and Appendix C is a Reference List of Books for Preschool Children. (For related documents, see PS 005 928 and PS 005 930.) (Author/RG)

Language: English

Published: Bloomington, Indiana, Jun 1972

Doctoral Dissertation

An Evaluation of Magnet School Programs-Parent Choice, Teacher Choice, and Pupil Choice: Implications of One Model for Curriculum Reform

Available from: University of Illinois - IDEALS

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Abstract/Notes: It is quite clear that there is considerable disagreement as to the ways children learn and the ways teachers should teach. There is very little conclusive data comparing the major efforts in this field particularly with respect to any one factor being the sole contributor to the superiority of any one effort. The recent literature on learning and teaching almost invariably returns to some form of curriculum reform. However, there is widespread agreement that teachers teach more effectively and children learn more efficiently if they are in environments conducive to their preferred styles. Magnet Schools are vehicles that require different arrangements for teaching and learning. This study explores the attitudes of teachers, parents, and students in such an environment. Additionally, it examines the academic performance of students when parents or the students themselves select their learning environment and teaching method. The data will permit comparisons among the various groups of Magnet and non-Magnet parents, teachers, and students. The primary method for data collection is academic testing and structural surveys of the populations relative to Magnet and non-Magnet participants. The data will also indicate how individuals view programs and curriculum when they are involved in them. Because the population surveyed and tested involved a cross-section of academic abilities, the data will be especially useful to local school district officials interested in providing for individual differences in teaching and learning. The control model of Magnet School programs provides an ongoing testing ground for fine-tuning educational theories which may be essential for productive learning in the broader system as well.

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 1984

Book

The Multiage Evaluation Book

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Abstract/Notes: Multiage is an instructional design whereby students from two or more grades are blended together into a learning community that progresses with the same teacher(s) for two or more years. This book was designed to help teachers and administrators explore, implement, and evaluate their multiage program. The book is presented in four parts. The first three parts share a consistent format and include a series of checklists and charts for participating educators to complete. Part 1, "Exploring the Multiage Classroom," examines the multiage classroom, reasons for its implementation, and the kinds of instructional practices commonly associated with it. Part 2, "Implementing the Multiage Classroom," presents the steps involved in planning the instructional design associated with a multiage classroom. Part 3, "Evaluating the Multiage Classroom," provides assistance in establishing an evaluation process for the multiage instructional design, clarifying the elements to be evaluated and how

Language: English

Published: Peterborough, New Hampshire: Crystal Springs Books, 1999

ISBN: 1-884548-26-1

Article

Assessment and Evaluation in the Multiage Classroom. Special Issue

Available from: ERIC

Publication: OSSC Bulletin, vol. 39, no. 3/4

Academic achievement, Americas, Nongraded schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Assessment of student progress is a challenge for educators who use developmentally appropriate practices such as multiage grouping. Interest in alternative types of assessment has become widespread. These performance-based, or authentic, assessments are explored in this document, which presents assessment strategies that work effectively with multiage instructional approaches. Chapter 1 begins by examining the purposes of assessment and then compares the characteristics, strengths, and limitations of conventional and authentic assessments. Chapter 2 explores methods used to assess and document the process of learning, such as observation, anecdotal records, and developmental checklists, and presents means of assessing, evaluating, and organizing authentic products of student learning. Issues involved in reporting student progress to parents and administration are examined in the third chapter. Chapter 4 considers the implications of authentic-assessment approaches for administrators and school boards, and summarizes what administrators should know about teachers' requirements to effectively implement new assessment methods. A summary publication is included. The appendix contains an overview of authentic-assessment practices in Oregon. Data were gathered from interviews with 10 educators and assessment specialists.

Language: English

ISSN: 0095-6694

Book

The Faxon Montessori Magnet Elementary School, 1990-1991. Summative Evaluation

Academic achievement, Americas, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Elementary school students, Faxon Montessori (Kansas City, Missouri), Language skills, Magnet schools, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Nongraded schools

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Abstract/Notes: This report documents the progress made by the Faxon Montessori Magnet School in Kansas City, Missouri, during the three years of its implementation of the Montessori philosophy. During the 1990-91 school year, the school served children from three years of age through third grade. School enrollment information was analyzed and data were obtained from classroom observation; from parent, teacher, and student questionnaires; and from achievement tests. Analysis of enrollment information revealed that: (1) enrollment was at 93 percent of capacity; (2) enrollments varied by grade level; and (3) minority students comprised 61 percent of the student population. Classroom observation indicated that students were engaged in independent learning activities and activities that enhanced motor skills. Teacher-initiated management was minimal. Results from the questionnaires indicated that program participants were satisfied with most aspects of the program. However, teachers were dissatisfied with the amount of administrative support they received. Achievement scores of kindergarten, first-grade, and second-grade students on the reading, math, and language subtests of the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills were above district and national norms. Third graders scored above district, and below national, norms on the Missouri Mastery and Achievement Tests. Thirteen data tables and seven figures are included, and an appendix presents a description of the goals and activities of the Faxon Montessori extended day program. (BC)

Language: English

Published: Kansas City, Missouri: Kansas City School District, 1991-08

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