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849 results

Archival Material Or Collection

Box 15, Folder 32 - Notes, ca. 1929-1948 - "The Incarnation of Language or The Sensitive Period for Language"

Available from: Seattle University

Edwin Mortimer Standing - Biographic sources, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings

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Language: English

Archive: Seattle University, Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, Special Collections

Article

First Language Reading Skills Transfer to Second Language

Publication: El Boletin [Comité Hispano Montessori], no. 22

Pages: 2

Bilingualism, Comité Hispano Montessori - Periodicals, Language acquisition

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Language: English

Book Section

Language Games Children Play: Language Invention in a Montessori Primary School

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: Handbook of the Changing World Language Map

Pages: 1-14

Child development, Imaginary languages, Language acquisition, Linguistics, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools

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Abstract/Notes: This chapter illustrates the main results of a language laboratory held in a Montessori primary school in Milan, Italy, during 7 years. Pupils (age: 9–11) are guided in the collective invention of a secret language, using all their linguistic repertoire present in class – including minority and home languages. The structure of the language is highly influenced by the language of instruction (in our case, Italian), but, at the same time, it differs from that because its aim is to be secret. In other words, the invented language is shared among the class members only, who know how to decipher its alphabet and grammar, unlike other schoolmates. Secrecy permits the inventor to insert elements from other languages, resulting in an a priori language contact. During the process of invention, participants increase their metalinguistic awareness and thus their understanding of the languages they are studying formally – in our case, Italian and English. The Montessori method fosters a “learning-by-doing” approach and an active interdisciplinary cross-fertilization (called Cosmic Education). In fact, pupils may use the secret language to create an imaginary country – usually an island – and conceive a utopian society, putting together notions of natural sciences (for instance, orography) and social sciences, in particular, to describe the ideal human society speaking their secret language. The chapter also includes reflection on how this language laboratory can be applied in other educational contexts, maintaining its original character of being a serious game for learning.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing, 2019

ISBN: 978-3-319-73400-2

Article

Influences of Balanced Language Approach Applied at Montessori Kindergarten on Children's Language Ability / 몬테소리 유치원에 적용한 균형적 언어 접근법이 유아의 언어능력에 미치는 효과

Available from: DBpia

Publication: 열린유아교육연구 / The Journal of Korea Open Association for Early Childhood Education, vol. 13, no. 4

Pages: 97-122

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Abstract/Notes: This study examined the influences of balanced language approach applied at Montessori kindergarten on children's language ability. This is a response to the need of diverse researches on Montessori language education and aims to provide basic materials to improve children's language ability. For the study, 60 children of five-year old participated for 8 weeks. The experimental group received Montessori language education with the balanced language approach program and the control group received general Montessori language education, The study found that the experimental group performing both Montessori language education and balanced language approach program showed significantly higher scores in language ability than the control group having Montessori language education. / 본 연구의 목적은 몬테소리 언어교육과 관련하여 다각적인 응용연구가 이루어져야 할 필요성에 따라 몬테소리 유치원에 적용한 균형적 언어 접근법이 유아의 언어능력에 어떠한 영향을 미치는지 알아봄으로써 유아의 언어능력을 향상시킬 수 있는 기초자료로 제공하고자 한다. 이를 위하여 유치원 만 5세 유아 60명을 대상으로 8주간의 실험처치로 실험집단에서는 몬테소리 교육의 언어활동과 균형적 언어 접근 프로그램을 병행하여 실시하고 비교집단에게는 일반적인 몬테소리 교육의 언어활동을 실시하였다. 연구결과, 몬테소리 교육의 언어활동과 균형적 언어 접근 프로그램을 병행한 실험집단이 몬테소리 교육의 언어활동만을 실시한 비교집단보다 언어능력의 점수에서 통계적으로 유의하게 높은 것으로 드러났다.

Language: Korean

ISSN: 1226-8119, 2734-0074

Article

A Path for the Exploration of Any Language Leading to Writing and Reading: As Part of the Total Montessori Approach to the Development of Language

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 29, no. 3

Pages: 1-40

Muriel I. Dwyer - Writings, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

MANZ Conference: Education and Peace: The Language of Connection

Publication: Montessori NewZ, vol. 42

Pages: 17

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Language: English

Article

Speech and Language Therapy at the Mary Frier Montessori Special Education School [Cleveland, OH]

Publication: Montessori Special News, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 3

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Language: English

Article

Entwicklung der Sprache und sprachliche Erziehung [Language development and linguistic education]

Publication: Montessori: Zeitschrift für Montessori-Pädagogik, vol. 38, no. 1-2

Pages: 28-41

Children - Language, Language acquisition, Montessori method of education

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Language: German

ISSN: 0944-2537

Archival Material Or Collection

Box 16, Folder 11 - Notes, ca. 1929-1948 - "Maths" [Decimals; Arithmetic; Education for Democracy; Fractions; Two Points;Dominated by History; S. Periods in Development; Language; Seasonal Materials; Study of Numbers, Triangles; Teaching Religion; Geography, Geometry, Money Sums, Literature; Multiplication; Fractions, Teaching Notes; Mathematics; Groups]

Available from: Seattle University

Edwin Mortimer Standing - Biographic sources, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings

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Language: English

Archive: Seattle University, Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, Special Collections

Conference Paper

Maria Montessori’s Philosophy of Education: An Early Beginning of Embodied Education

Available from: University Colleges Knowledge database (Denmark)

18th International Network of Philosophers of Education Conference: Pedagogical Forms in Times of Pandemic (Copenhagen, Denmark, 17-20 August 2022)

Comparative education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: For a century Montessori’s philosophy of education has been understood in separation from Dewey’s philosophy of education. According to Thayer-Bacon [1], a plausible explanation is that Kilpatrick, Dewey’s influential student, rejected Montessori’s system of education [2]. His main objection was that her educational system was founded on an outdated psychology. In contrast, this paper suggests, Montessori’s educational systems is founded on a psychology which, like Dewey’s, was markedly ahead of her time by putting purely embodied interactions with the environment as the foundation of human understanding. By comparing Montessori’s psychology [3; 4] to Dewey’s [5; 6] this paper shows their compatibility. The developed pragmatism of Sellars [5;6] and the interactivism of Bickhard [7] further enables us to explain how the prelinguistic human-environment interactions (or transactions), central to Dewey and Montessori, are pure processes [8]. The pure process ontology enables us to see how more complex processes emerge from simpler ones and how learning in the mere causal domain of bodily human-environment interactions can grow into the linguistic and conceptual domain of education. The ambition is to show that a flourishing interaction between Montessori and pragmatism is possible and preferable if we are to understand the proper role of the body in education. [1] Thayer-Bacon, Barbara (2012). Maria Montessori, John Dewey, and William H. Kilpatrick. Education and Culture, 28, 1, 3-20. [2] Kilpatrick, W. H. (1914). The Montessori system examined. Cambridge, Mass.; The Riverside Press [3] Montessori, M. (1912). The Montessori method. NY: Frederick A. Stokes Company [4] Montessori. M. (1949). The absorbent mind. Adyar: The Theosophical Publishing House [5] Dewey, J. (1916). Democracy and education. NY: The Macmillan Company [6] Dewey, J. (1925) Experience and nature. Chicago: Open Court Publishing Company [7] Sellars, W. (1960). Being and Being Known. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association, 34, 28-49. [8] Sellars, W. (1981). Foundations for a metaphysics of pure process: The Carus lectures of Wilfrid Sellars. The Monist 64 (1):3-90. [9] Bickhard, M. H. (2009). The interactivist model. Synthese, 166, 3, 547-591. [10] Seibt, Johanna (2016). How to Naturalize Intentionality and Sensory Consciousness within a Process Monism with Gradient Normativity—A Reading of Sellars. In James O'Shea (ed.), Sellars and His Legacy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 186-222.

Language: English

Published: Copenhagen, Denmark: International Network of Philosophers of Education, 2022

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