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874 results

Article

Sharing: Helping Children Develop Appropriate Social Skills

Publication: Infants and Toddlers, vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 5–9, 14–17

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Cognitive Performance in Montessori and Nursery School Children

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: The Journal of Educational Research, vol. 62, no. 9

Pages: 411-416

Americas, Cognition, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Cognitive performance was measured in fourteen pairs of children, matched in social class, CA, sex and IQ, selected from a Montessori and from a “traditional” nursery school. No differences were found between the parents in these schools on such measures of social and parental attitudes and behavior as: achievement orientation, traditional family ideology, dogmatism, anomie, parental control behavior, or task oriented vs. person oriented values. The nursery school children were significantly more creative on a measure of non-verbal creativity, were more socially oriented, and less task oriented than the Montessori children.Style of approach to tests was felt to be a critical outcome of the two educational environments. The Montessori children used significantly more physical characteristics to describe commonplace objects, whereas significantly more functional terms were used by the nursery school children in their descriptions. Montessori children’s drawings had people present significantly less often and geometric forms significantly more often than the nursery school children’s drawings.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/00220671.1969.10883885

ISSN: 0022-0671

Article

Dr. Maria Montessori og bornene [Dr. Maria Montessori and the children]

Publication: Tidens kvinder, vol. 4, no. 37

Pages: 3-6

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Language: Danish

ISSN: 0040-6775

Patent

Sistema para iniciar a los niños en el estudio de la aritmética y de la geometría plana y del espacio [System to initiate children in the study of arithmetic and plane and space geometry]

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Patent.

Language: Spanish

Date of issue: 1919-01-01

Article

Develop Initiative in Children; Dr. Montessori Method; Auto-Correction Proper System

Available from: California Digital Newspaper Collection

Publication: San Francisco Call and Post (San Francisco, California)

Pages: 16

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Reprinted in 'The California Lectures of Maria Montessori, 1915' (Clio Press, 1997).

Language: English

Article

A Test of Testing: What Does It Do to Children?

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 11, no. 4

Pages: 2, 21

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Widening Horizons: Why Foreign Languages are Good for Children with Communication Difficulties

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 79

Pages: 40–41

Bilingualism, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, People with disabilities

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Fostering Emotion Regulation in Lower Elementary Children through Practical Life Exercises

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education, Practical life exercises

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Abstract/Notes: This action research investigated how integrating practical life exercises and self-regulation lessons could foster emotion regulation in lower elementary children. Twenty First and Second grade students in a public Montessori school participated in this four-week study. Quantitative data tools included students’ feelings self assessments, parent questionnaire, feelings check-in, and tallies of student behavior. Qualitative tools included students’ feeling journals, my observation journal, and children’s practical life reflection. Data analysis indicated that teaching children to identify their feelings and offering choices of calm down activities in the practical life area gave children the tools to recalibrate themselves. By the end of the study, an increasing number of children checked in daily as feeling happy, calm, and focused. Introducing social emotional lessons in September alongside classroom rules, routines, and expectations along with calm down tools equips children with a preventative rather than remedial repertoire of tools to emotionally regulate themselves to be successful learners for life.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

Article

All Children Want to Learn . . .

Publication: Montessori Courier, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 5–7

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Abstract/Notes: Excerpt from Montessori Play and Learn

Language: English

ISSN: 0959-4108

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Objectively Measured Sedentary Behavior in Preschool Children: Comparison Between Montessori and Traditional Preschools

Available from: BioMed Central

Publication: The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 10, no. 2

Pages: Article 2

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Background This study aimed to compare the levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior in children attending Montessori preschools with those attending traditional preschools. Methods The participants in this study were preschool children aged 4 years old who were enrolled in Montessori and traditional preschools. The preschool children wore ActiGraph accelerometers. Accelerometers were initialized using 15-second intervals and sedentary behavior was defined as <200 counts/15-second. The accelerometry data were summarized into the average minutes per hour spent in sedentary behavior during the in-school, the after-school, and the total-day period. Mixed linear regression models were used to determine differences in the average time spent in sedentary behavior between children attending traditional and Montessori preschools, after adjusting for selected potential correlates of preschoolers’ sedentary behavior. Results Children attending Montessori preschools spent less time in sedentary behavior than those attending traditional preschools during the in-school (44.4. min/hr vs. 47.1 min/hr, P = 0.03), after-school (42.8. min/hr vs. 44.7 min/hr, P = 0.04), and total-day (43.7 min/hr vs. 45.5 min/hr, P = 0. 009) periods. School type (Montessori or traditional), preschool setting (private or public), socio-demographic factors (age, gender, and socioeconomic status) were found to be significant predictors of preschoolers’ sedentary behavior. Conclusions Levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior were significantly lower among children attending Montessori preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools. Future research should examine the specific characteristics of Montessori preschools that predict the lower levels of sedentary behavior among children attending these preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-10-2

ISSN: 1479-5868

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