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984 results

Article

Connecting Montessori Public Policy Research and Advocacy

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 1

Pages: 9

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Our New 3-Year Plan: More Services, Teachers, and Public Visibility

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 6

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Grassroots Montessori: Cincinnati's Groundswell to Create One of the Country's Few Public Neighborhood Montessori Schools

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 22, no. 3

Pages: 4-7A,8A,9A,10A

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Abstract/Notes: In 2002, Cincinnati Public Schools (CPS) adopted a policy committing itself to develop all schools in the district as community learning centers. In Pleasant Ridge, one of Cincinnati's most racially and socio-economically diverse neighborhoods, the community set itself to the task of rebuilding what had been a failing school that reflected little of the neighborhood's diversity. After-school programming to provide extracurricular opportunities emerged as a top priority, as did health and wellness services. Another priority was the development of the Pleasant Ridge school facility as an environmentally sound and sustainable "green" building. Yet, despite the promise of an environmentally cutting-edge school and partnerships ranging from the YMCA to various health providers, all of this was not sufficient to attract new families to the school. And so, just as the environmental enthusiasts were leading a grassroots effort to dramatically change the plans for the physical facility, a group of young parents became involved in challenging the academic program. This group, mostly parents of infants and toddlers, asked themselves, "What would it take for us to send our children to this new school?" Their collective answer was a conversion to a Montessori program.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Public Knowledge of Montessori Education

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 24, no. 1

Pages: 18-21

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Abstract/Notes: The American public generally recognizes the name "Montessori" because so many schools across the country and around the world use the Montessori name. However, the Montessori community has long believed that misunderstandings abound. A recent dissertation study quantified Montessori awareness and identified misconceptions in particular for those aspects of Montessori education that are unique, relative to other educational settings. In order to gauge public understanding of Montessori education, an online survey was conducted with members of an Internet panel administered by a national research firm. The study included a demographically representative sample of 1,520 U.S. adult panel members, who answered questions regarding their understanding of Montessori education. Two members of the American Montessori Society's Research Committee and six Montessori teachers, including a combination of early childhood and elementary teachers with AMS and AMI credentials, reviewed the survey to identify any disagreements on correct answers for the Montessori knowledge questions. The survey was field-tested with six individuals, including parents and nonparents, both with and without Montessori experience, to identify any potential points of confusion. Results show that the public clearly lacks understanding of the Montessori perspective on extrinsic rewards, including such things as stickers, certificates, and even teacher praise. Since extrinsic rewards are common in other school settings, their absence in Montessori environments may seem peculiar unless people understand that Montessori philosophy is based on the idea that students develop intrinsic motivation when the learning activity itself, not an external incentive, is its own reward. The public recognizes that developing children's concentration abilities is a goal of Montessori education, but opportunities exist for helping people understand specific practices employed to achieve this goal (i.e., providing opportunities for long stretches of uninterrupted work time, allowing the child to determine the timing of changing activities). Better understanding of the reasons behind the unique structure of the schedule in a Montessori classroom will help people see that the differences from other educational environments are based on a comprehensive philosophy of child development. (Contains 3 figures and 1 table.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

John McDermott and the Road to Montessori Public Schools

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 3

Pages: 46-49

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author states that, for over 45 years, she has explored the issues of leadership and change, and, along the way, she has examined how diversity fits in with these ideas. She states that she found all three of these concepts embodied in the person of John McDermott, a leader in the American Montessori movement in the United States. McDermott helped establish the framework for putting Montessori education into an American cultural context. His message was always the need for public education, the necessity of embracing African-Americans and the poor in Montessori schools, and the damage to cities caused by white flight. McDermott held to his view that the quality of public education was key to the future of the republic. He decried the economic and social disparity between poor urban and inner-city schools and those of the affluent middle class, along with the ever-widening gap between the poor and the affluent and between blacks, Latinos, and whites. McDermott continued to stress the need to make Montessori education relevant to present problems, although he did not view Montessori education as a single solution to the problems in American education. He challenged the American Montessori Society to examine the ways in which growth and change occur in America.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori as an American Public School Alternative

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 1

Pages: 26-31

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Other News [Argentine Republic, Germany, the Maldive Islands, Sweden, U.S.A.]

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1960, no. 3/4

Pages: 34–35

Americas, Argentina, Asia, Europe, Germany, Latin America and the Caribbean, Maldives, North America, Northern Europe, Scandinavia, South America, South Asia

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

A Full Day Program in DC Public Schools

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 10, no. 3

Pages: 4–6

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Pre-Kindergarten Classroom Practices in Oklahoma Public Schools: Influence of Teacher and Principal Beliefs and Characteristics

Available from: SHAREOK

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to examine the relations between pre-kindergarten (pre-K) teachers' characteristics, belief in developmentally appropriate practices (DAP), and DAP classroom practices and 2) to examine the relations between principals' characteristics, DAP and testing beliefs, and preferred pre-K classroom practices. Sixty-six principals and 63 pre-K teachers from public schools in small districts (districts with only one elementary school) in Oklahoma participated. Principals and teachers completed questionnaires containing DAP, demographic, and time allocation information. Data were analyzed using correlations and regressions.Findings and Conclusions: In the study of teachers, number of child development courses taken (r=-.29) and number of years experience teaching pre-K (r=.30) were related to DAP beliefs. The relation of DAP beliefs to DAP classroom practices was moderated by teacher's beliefs in the importance of obedience; DAP beliefs and practices were positively related for teachers with lower belief in the importance of child obedience. In the study of principals, principals' ECE courses taken (r=.36), ECE state test certification (r=.59), elementary certification (r=.34), number of years as a principal (r=-.25), years teaching preschoolers (r=.35), experience teaching 4th to 6th grades (r=-.35), and years teaching 4th to 6th grades (r=-.30) were related to principals' beliefs in DAP. Principals' ECE state certification (r=.41), ECE courses taken (r=.27), and years teaching 4th to 6th grades (r=-.33) were related to preferred DAP classroom practices and experience teaching 1st to 3rd grades (r=-.29) was related to use of workbooks and worksheets. DAP beliefs (r=.60) were significantly related to preferred DAP classroom practices. Testing beliefs were not related to principal characteristics or preferred classroom practices. The relation between the number of early childhood courses taken by principals and preferred DAP classroom practices was mediated by principals' beliefs in DAP.

Language: English

Published: Stillwater, Oklahoma, 2010

Article

Public Instruction and Education; Guatemala

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: Bulletin of the Pan American Union, vol. 58, no. 6

Pages: 630-631

Americas, Central America, Guatemala, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Specifically see pg. 631: "The school supply section furnished all the equipment necessary to the national schools, Montessori kindergarten material being imported."

Language: English

ISSN: 2332-9424

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