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Book Section

Montessori with the Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation of Some Research Findings

Book Title: Montessori Schools in America: Historical, Philosophical, and Empirical Research Perspectives

Pages: 153-162

African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article was originally published as an entry in Early Education, eds. R. D. Hess and R. M. Bear (Chicago: Aldine, 1968), p. 105-118.

Language: English

Published: Lexington, Massachusetts: Ginn Custom Pub., 1981

Edition: 1st ed.

ISBN: 0-536-03647-0

Book Section

Montessori with the Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation and Some Research Findings

Available from: Books to Borrow @ Internet Archive

Book Title: Early Education: Current Theory, Research, and Action

Pages: 105-118

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: Chicago: Aldine Pub. Co., 1968

Master's Thesis

Mixed-Age Grouping in Kindergarten: A Best Case Example of Developmentally Appropriate Practice or Horace Mann's Worst Nightmare?.

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This practicum study examined kindergarten teachers' perspectives regarding mixed-age groupings that included kindergarten students. The study focused on pedagogical reasons for using mixed-age grouping, ingredients necessary for successful implementation of a multiage program that includes kindergartners, and the perceived effects of a multiage program on kindergartners. Participating were 48 public and private school kindergarten teachers from Ohio and Kentucky who taught in multiage settings. Questionnaire results indicated that teachers believed schools implemented multiage programs because they viewed them as benefiting children; encouraging appropriate, student-centered, practices; reducing pressures for competition; developing peer learning; facilitating flexible student pacing; and promoting a family-like climate. Necessary components for successful implementation of mixed-age grouping included developmental curricula, pre-implementation discussions, parental knowledge and

Language: English

Published: Canton, Ohio, 1997

Report

Ungraded Primary Programs: Steps toward Developmentally Appropriate Instruction

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This volume presents case studies of 10 ungraded primary programs. Also discussed are the obstacles, accomplishments, advantages, and disadvantages of ungraded primary programs experienced by the faculties of these schools; their recommendations for future implementation; and the literature on multi-age grouping and ungraded primary programs. Case studies were used to: (1) illustrate concepts, procedures, and materials being used by schools that had initiated ungraded primary programs; (2) provide contact information for these schools so that other educators could call on them for assistance; and (3) assess commonalities in effective ungraded primary programs. Each case study of an ungraded primary program describes the philosophy and goals, and program background and implementation. Each program's practices regarding grouping and organization, curriculum and instruction, student assessment, and remediation and enrichment, are described. In addition, the teacher's role, the

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., Apr 1991

Book Section

Montessori with the Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation and Some Research Findings

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Book Title: Early Formal Education: Current Theory, Research, and Practice

Pages: 105-118

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This chapter describes a small research project evaluating the effects of a Montessori pre-school program upon the cognitive development of a group of Negro children from families in the Aid to Dependent Children category. The program has involved bringing a group of these children into classrooms for middle-class children in a parent-organized Montessori school in Hyde Park. Glen Nimnicht reports that the New Nursery School project at Colorado State College has also found some decreases in IQ in permissive non-integrated classroom programs for culturally disadvantaged children. During the summer, three Head Start classrooms were held in the Ancona Montessori School in the context of a general summer school program. Two of the classrooms were integrated: they were composed of half Head Start children, half middle-class children. The children of average IQ on first testing increased as much as did the children of low IQ on first testing.

Language: English

Published: New York: Routledge, 2017

Edition: 1st

ISBN: 978-1-351-31268-4 978-1-138-52252-7

Conference Paper

Responses to Guidelines for Developmentally Appropriate Practice for Young Children and Montessori

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (Nov 13-16, 1986)

Early childhood education, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Three central components of the Montessori method are described and shown to be reflected in the National Association for the Education of Young Children's (NAEYC) guidelines for developmentally appropriate curricula. NAEYC guideline 1C states, "Teachers prepare the environment for children to learn through active exploration and interaction with adults, other children, and materials"; this is a statement of a basic Montessori principle. A second Montessori principle concerning "sensitive periods" is reflected in the entire body of the NAEYC guidelines. A third principle common to both Montessori practice and the NAEYC guidelines is the idea of the teacher as an observer. It is concluded that, if early childhood educators intend to follow the NAEYC guidelines, they will be behaving very much like Montessori teachers. (RH)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C.: NAEYC, Nov 14, 1986

Pages: 12

Article

Nine Developmental Needs of Adolescents

Publication: Montessori Insights

Pages: 18-19

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Language: English

Article

Montessori: The Original D.A.P.? [Developmentally Appropriate Practice]

Publication: PNMA Newsletter

Pages: 4

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Abstract/Notes: Presentation at Washington Association for the Education of Young Children. Newsletter of the Pacific Northwest Montessori Association (Kirkland, Washington).

Language: English

Article

Montessori Developmental Principles to Support the Needs of the Elderly

Available from: Association Montessori Internationale

Publication: AMI Journal (2013-), vol. 2020

Pages: 306-309

Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Language: English

ISSN: 2215-1249, 2772-7319

Article

A Developmental Perspective of Spirituality

Publication: The Child and You, vol. 1

Pages: 22-28

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Language: English

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