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369 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Duyu Eğitiminin Otistik Çocukların Alıcı Dil Gelişimine Etkileri / Evaluation of Sensorial Education on Receptive Language Development of Autistic Children

Available from: DergiPark Akademik

Publication: Kastamonu Eğitim Dergisi / Kastamonu Education Journal, vol. 25, no. 5

Pages: 1819-1834

Asia, Autism in children, Children with disabilities, Developmentally disabled children, Language acquisition, Language development, Middle East, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education, Sensorial education, Sensorial materials, Turkey

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Abstract/Notes: This study aimed to evaluate a sensorial education program using Montessori sensorial materials on receptive language development of 8 young children (DSM-V) with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). At the end of 6 months intervention period, the sensory processing of the participants was evaluated using Sensory Processing Evaluation Form for Children with ASD and their receptive language level was measured using Peabody Picture – Vocabulary Test. In this study, multiple survey models between subjects were used in single subject design. The emerging findings of the research suggest that there is a substantial improvement in auditory, visual and tactile skills of five out of eight participants. The remainder three participants demonstrated increase in their receptive language scores but a little improvement was observed in their auditory, tactile and visual comprehension. / Bu araştırmada, montessori materyalleri ile sunulan duyusal entegrasyon programının otizmli çocukların alıcı dil gelişimi üzerine etkisinin incelenmesi amaçlanmıştır. Araştırma grubunu, bir okul öncesi kurumunda kaynaştırma eğitimine devam eden, DSM-V kriterlerine göre otizm tanısı almış 8 otizmli çocuk oluşturmaktadır. Çalışma öncesi ve sonrasında çalışma grubunu oluşturan otizmli çocuklar duyusal açısı ve alıcı dil düzeyleri; Peabody Resim-Kelime Testi ve Otizmli Çocuklar İçin Duyusal Değerlendirme Formu kullanılarak değerlendirilmişlerdir. Bu çalışmada, tek-denekli araştırma yöntemlerinden, denekler arası çoklu yoklama modeli kullanılmıştır.Çalışmanın sonucunda; araştırma grubundaki çocuklardan beşinin; işitsel, görsel ve dokunsal algı becerilerinde önemli ölçüde başarı sağladıkları ve dil puanlarının yükseldiği gözlenmiştir. Diğer üç denekte ise; alıcı dil puanlarının yükseldiği ancak işitsel, dokunsal ve görsel algılarındaki artışın daha sınırlı olduğu görülmüştür.

Language: Turkish

ISSN: 2147-9844

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Materials and (Language) Learning Environment Based on Montessori Concepts

Available from: LLT Journal

Publication: LLT Journal: A Journal on Language and Language Teaching, vol. 21, no. 1

Pages: 46-54

Children with disabilities, Classroom environments, Inclusive education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities, Prepared environment

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori Education is widely spread in almost all countries in the world. Even though this school is meant for all kinds of learners including “normal” learners, the Montessori education concepts used in Montessori schools will be very supportive education for children with special needs. Therefore, the schools which adopt Montessori education concepts can facilitate inclusion, especially with the concepts of ‘I can do it myself.’ Inclusive education needs to be carefully prepared and implemented by schools. The movement brings about some challenges for teachers. This paper explores the environment and materials based on Montessori education concepts. The environment and materials are suitable for all types of learners and thus can be an option to be implemented in the inclusive education setting. Teaching materials rooted in Montessori education concepts indeed cater all ages and embrace the needs of all students. DOI: doi.org/10.24071/llt.2018.210105

Language: English

DOI: 10.24071/llt.2018.210105

ISSN: 2579-9533

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Building Vietnamese Language System for Children 5-7 Years of Age with Montessori Method

Available from: Macrothink Institute

Publication: Journal of Studies in Education, vol. 9, no. 4

Pages: 42-53

Asia, Language acquisition, Language development, Southeast Asia, Vietnam

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Abstract/Notes: Language is a very socially important and basic structure of thought. It allows the child to integrate into society and dealing with abstract concepts. The principle of language education is that Montessori language is attached to human life; language is a form of sound or image that represents human perception of objective or subjective life. Thus, Maria's principle of language development is attached to things, from abstract objects to linguistic sounds, and from linguistic sounds to symbolic characters. This article systematizes Maria Montessori's core views on children’s language acquisition as well as the principles affecting this process. Subsequently, it analyzes the development principles of the Montessori method as a basis for lesson and teaching tools development for Vietnamese language education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5296/jse.v9i4.15579

ISSN: 2162-6952

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Second Language Corner for Children’s House: A Practitioner–Researcher Journey Into Bilingualism in Montessori Education

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 7, no. 1

Pages: 67-82

Americas, Bilingualism, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This work reports, from a qualitative research perspective, the development of an English Corner project for a preschool Children’s House classroom in central Mexico over the course of a 3-year period. It shows the transition of a language specialist over six consecutive periods of work, from a traditional understanding and practice of teaching English as a second language to young learners into a more comprehensive one of the Montessori Method. The analysis of my own practice is used to recover insights through a reflective process with the intention to develop a second language (L2) Montessori program for 3- to 6-year-olds that aligns better with Montessori pedagogy.  Variables such as instruction time, setting, group constitution, materials, and teaching and learning strategies allowed for certain aspects to arise as leading points of interest for the focus of the analysis and the methodological and pedagogical adaptations that followed each period. This paper is an attempt to fill the gap between the need to deliver a second language effectively in Montessori education and the lack of guidance for doing it the Montessori way; it is especially for practitioners who do not have a Montessori background but also for Montessori-trained teachers for whom more specific preparation would aid their practice. I also hope to stimulate further research in the field of second language acquisition and multilingualism in Montessori education at every level of education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v7i1.13401

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Multilingualism in a Montessori Preschool: A Study of Language Variability in a Linguistically Diverse Preschool Programme

Available from: IndianJournals

Publication: Journal of Exclusion Studies, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 111-131

Asia, Bilingualism, India, Multilingualism, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This article is based on a study of an ‘English-medium’ preschool programme for underprivileged children. The diverse linguistic backgrounds of the teachers and students prompted an enquiry into how multiple languages would be negotiated in the setting and how comprehension, learning and communication would occur given that none of the children came from English-speaking homes. The article identifies and interprets key features of verbal language that were observed in the setting and articulates implications for educational practice.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5958/2231-4555.2019.00009.3

ISSN: 2231-4547, 2231-4555

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Max: Concern with Social Skills, Language and Excessive TV Viewing in a 3 Year Old

Available from: Lippincott Wolters

Publication: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, vol. 27, no. 6

Pages: 488–492

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Abstract/Notes: Max is a 3-year-old healthy boy who was brought to the pediatrician's office by his mother for frequent temper tantrums at home. His teachers at the Montessori school are concerned about his communication skills. He is very talkative with his peers, but he constantly speaks about Thomas the Tank Engine. His peers seem to be uninterested in his repetitive stories. His teachers believe that Max has difficulty separating fantasy and reality. At home, his mother describes Max as “difficult to control.” When placed in time-out, he hits, kicks and scratches his mother. He has a large vocabulary, but mostly speaks in phrases directly from cartoons. For example, he repeats a particular phrase from a program in which the main character grows in size with fury every time he gets angry and says, “I hate it, leave me alone.” Before this exposure, the mother reports that her son had never used the word “hate.” Max watches 5 hours of children's programs on television every day; he is not exposed to any news programs. Frequently, he watches the same episode of a program many times. Max's mother believes that he can watch as much TV as he wants as long as it is “good programming,” so he only watches PBS kids shows and the Disney channel.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1097/DBP.0b013e3181d83173

ISSN: 0196-206X

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Introducing Constructivism to Young Learners: Analysing the Impact on English Language Performance

Available from: International Knowledge Sharing Platform

Publication: Journal of Culture, Society and Development, vol. 46

Pages: 51-58

Asia, Constructivism (Education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Southeast Asia, Thailand

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Abstract/Notes: The significance of this study was to observe the instructional effect of constructivist teaching methodologies on English language performance outcomes among grade four students at a private all-boys school in central Bangkok. The experiment comprised two classes of differing ability: Class One (n = 18) classified as above average; and, Class Two (n = 15) below average. Both groups were taught according to the traditional Thai syllabus in the first semester of the academic year of 2016/17, transitioning to a constructivist learning environment in the second semester. The results of formal academic assessments were analysed via t-tests (<0.05); and the findings revealed that, as a result of the constructivist program, a significant difference was observed in both classes in relation to speaking attainments. However, in terms of overall language performance, a significant difference was noted in Class One only.

Language: English

DOI: 10.7176/JCSD/46-07

ISSN: 2422-8400

Master's Thesis (M.A.)

A Comparison of Montessori and Traditionally Schooled Five Year Olds in the Language, Motor, and Concept Area Skills of the Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning-Revised

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation

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Abstract/Notes: This quasi-experimental research study examined the performance of two groups of five year old children on the Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning-Revised (DIAL-R) (1990) in relationship to their method of schooling. The purpose of the study was to compare mean scores received by the Montessori group (N=10) and the Traditional group (N=10) on Motor Area skills, Concept Area skills, and Language Area skills of the DIAL-R (1990) using t tests for independent samples. Scores received on each test item were also analyzed statistically to determine the specific strengths and weaknesses of each subject group. The findings show that there was no significant difference between the two subject groups in the Motor Area skills as assessed by the DIAL-R (1990). There was a significant difference between the two subject groups in the Concept Area skills which favored the Montessori subjects. The Montessori group performed better than did the Traditional group in the Language Area skills of the DIAL-R (1990), but the difference was not statistically significant. Implications of these findings for Early Childhood educators are discussed, in view of the fact that this sample was quite small. The findings provide support for both the Montessori and Traditional programs for young children found within the Dallas Public Schools in student performance on the DIAL-R (1990). Recommendations for further studies are also given.

Language: English

Published: Denton, Texas, 1995

Book Section

Development of Language in the Normal Child

Book Title: Readings Toward a Montessori Language Curriculum

Pages: 11-24

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Abstract/Notes: Previously published as an entry in the edited volume, "Language Intervention with the Retarded" (1972).

Language: English

Published: Lexington, Massachusetts: Ginn Press, 1986

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Pretending Emotions in the Early Years: The Role of Language and Symbolic Play

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Infancy, vol. 26, no. 6

Pages: 920-931

Child development, Developmental psychology, Emotion recognition in children, Emotions in children, Language acquisition, Montessori method of education, Play

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Abstract/Notes: Although 3-year-old children sometimes simulate emotions to adapt to social norms, we do not know if even younger children can pretend emotions in playful contexts. The present study investigated (1) what emotions infants of 1–2 years old are capable of pretending and (2) the possible role of language and symbolic play in the ability to pretend emotions. The sample included 69 infants aged 18 to 31 months and their parents. Infants were administrated the Test of Pretend Play, and their parents responded to the MacArthur-Bates CDI-II inventory, part of the MacArthur-Bates CDI-I, and a questionnaire about the expression of pretend emotions. Results suggest that very young children simulate emotions. Furthermore, children's simulation of emotions was related to both symbolic play and language. Specifically, the ability to label emotions was linked to the ability to simulate them. The role of language and symbolic play in the development of the capacity to express and understand pretend emotions is discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1111/infa.12414

ISSN: 1532-7078

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