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584 results

Article

Celebrating the Difference: For Partial Vision in Alternative Education

Available from: ERIC

Publication: ΣΚΟΛΕ [Skole]: The Journal of Alternative Education, vol. 15, no. 1

Pages: 53-57

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Abstract/Notes: This Journal title is also sometimes known as 'SKOLE: The Journal of Alternative Education'

Language: English

ISSN: 1056-9197

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

The Historical Evolution and Contemporary Status of Montessori Schooling in New Zealand as an Example of the Adaptation of an Alternative Educational Ideal to a Particular National Context

Available from: Massey University - Theses and Dissertations

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, Montessori schools, New Zealand, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: There have been two distinct phases of the Montessori method of education in New Zealand. The first began in 1912 and continued into the 1950s. The second phase, starting in 1975, has resulted in over one hundred Montessori early childhood centres being established throughout the country. In this thesis I examined the historical evolution and contemporary status of Montessori schooling in New Zealand, as an adaptation of an alternative educational ideal to a particular national context. To situate this study, the history of the Montessori movement was investigated, taking into consideration the particular character and personality of its founder, Dr. Maria Montessori (1870-1952). It is argued that the apparent contradictions of Montessori, who claimed to be both a scientific educator and a missionary, help explain the endurance of her method. The thesis further maintains that Montessori became a global educator whose philosophy and pedagogy transcends national boundaries. The middle section of this thesis examines the Montessori movement in New Zealand during the first phase and the second phase, highlighting the key role that individuals played in spreading Montessori's ideas. The major aim was to examine how Montessori education changes and adapts in different cultures and during different time frames. The thesis concentrates on New Zealand as a culturally specific example of a global phenomenon. The final section of the thesis is a case study of a Montessori early childhood centre examining the influence of Government policy and how the development of the centre supports the ongoing implementation of Montessori's ideas. The perceptions of Montessori teachers, former parents and students regarding the nature and value of Montessori education are also considered. Finally, observations carried out as part of the case study are analysed to further demonstrate the ways in which the original ideas of Montessori have been reworked to suit a different historical and societal context. It is concluded that Montessori is a global educator whose philosophy and pedagogy transcends national boundaries. Nonetheless, the integration of Montessori education within any country, including New Zealand, does result in a culturally specific Montessori education.

Language: English

Published: Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2004

Article

Philosophically-Based Alternatives in Education: An Exploration of Learner-Centered, Progressive, and Holistic Education

Publication: Encounter: Education for Meaning and Social Justice, vol. 17, no. 1

Pages: 17-27

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Abstract/Notes: Based on a database of over 500 resources, this paper explores the educational alternatives that exist today between the cracks of mainstream education and culture. It presents information about the growing numbers of schools and education centers that call themselves learner-centered, progressive, and/or holistic. Sources of data for this summary report also include over 3 years of informal interviews with and observations of people at alternative schools. The paper begins by examining terminology issues, discussing qualities for distinguishing educational alternatives, and describing eight types of schools (democratic and free schools, folk education, Quaker schools, homeschooling/unschooling/deschooling, Krishnamurti schools, Montessori schools, open schools, and Waldorf schools). It also presents frameworks for education (maps for understanding the territories of alternatives), and it discusses the three orientations of a competency based education: transaction (progressive), self-directed (learner-centered), and transformation (holistic). After looking at political issues around school choice which could impact the growth of the various philosophical alternatives, the paper concludes that in a society where issues of pluralism and diversity are valued as part of creating a more sustainable world and just democracy, the diversity of philosophical perspectives in education needs to be acknowledged. (Contains 41 references.) (SM)

Language: English

ISSN: 1094-3838, 2158-8414

Report

Alternatives in Education: An Exploration of Learner-Centered, Progressive, and Holistic Education

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Based on a database of over 500 resources, this paper explores the educational alternatives that exist today between the cracks of mainstream education and culture. It presents information about the growing numbers of schools and education centers that call themselves learner-centered, progressive, and/or holistic. Sources of data for this summary report also include over 3 years of informal interviews with and observations of people at alternative schools. The paper begins by examining terminology issues, discussing qualities for distinguishing educational alternatives, and describing eight types of schools (democratic and free schools, folk education, Quaker schools, homeschooling/unschooling/deschooling, Krishnamurti schools, Montessori schools, open schools, and Waldorf schools). It also presents frameworks for education (maps for understanding the territories of alternatives), and it discusses the three orientations of a competency based education: transaction (progressive), self-directed (learner-centered), and transformation (holistic). After looking at political issues around school choice which could impact the growth of the various philosophical alternatives, the paper concludes that in a society where issues of pluralism and diversity are valued as part of creating a more sustainable world and just democracy, the diversity of philosophical perspectives in education needs to be acknowledged. (Contains 41 references.) (SM)

Language: English

Published: New Orleans, Louisiana, 2002

Article

Achieving Inclusive Education in Early Childhood: From the Viewpoint of an Affinity Between Inclusive Education and Montessori Education

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku / モンテッソーリ教育 [Montessori Education], no. 49

Pages: 100-113

Asia, East Asia, Inclusive education, Japan, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This is an article from Montessori Education, a Japanese language periodical published by the Japan Association Montessori.

Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Comparison of the Intuitive Mathematic Skills of Preschool Children Who Take Education According to Ministry of National Education Preschool Education Program and Montessori Approach

Available from: IISTE - International Knowledge Sharing Platform

Publication: International Journal of Scientific and Technological Research, vol. 6, no. 6

Pages: 167

Asia, Comparative education, Mathematics education, Middle East, Montessori method of education, Preschool children, Preschool education, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This study analyzed intuitive mathematics abilities of preschool children and to ascertain whether there was a difference between children who were educated according to the Ministry of National Education (MoNE) preschool education program and the Montessori approach. It was also examined whether the intuitive mathematics abilities of the children who were educated according to the MoNE program and Montessori approach showed a significant difference according to variables of gender, duration of pre-school education, and educational levels of parents. The study sample of the study consisted of 121 children (56 girls, 65 boys) aged between 60-72 months. The data was collected via “Personal Information Form” and “Intuitive Mathematics Ability Scale” developed by Güven (2001). Intuitive mathematical abilities of children who were educated according to the Montessori program were more developed compared to those of children educated according to MoNE program. There was no significant difference in intuitive mathematical abilities according to duration of preschool education, education levels of parents. As a result of the study, a significant difference was observed in the intuitive math abilities of the children trained according to the MoNE program in favor of the girls, whereas no significant difference was observed trained according to the Montessori approach. The results are discussed in light of the relevant literature.

Language: Turkish

DOI: 10.7176/JSTR/6-06-12

ISSN: 2422-8702

Article

Une éducation pour une ère nouvelle: le congrès international d’éducation de Calais (1921) [Education for a new era: the international congress of education in Calais (1921)]

Available from: CAIRN

Publication: Les Études Sociales, vol. 163, no. 1

Pages: 43-77

Europe, France, New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Renouant avec les pratiques d’échanges intellectuels d’avant 1914, des spécialistes de l’éducation d’une quinzaine de pays, appartenant à l’enseignement public comme au secteur privé, tiennent un congrès original, durant deux semaines, à Calais. Au-delà du thème qui les rassemble, « l’expression créatrice de l’enfant », éducateurs théosophes, pédologues et psychologues de l’enfant, praticiens des écoles nouvelles et représentants de l’institution scolaire débattent d’une conception de l’éducation pertinente pour l’ère nouvelle de l’humanité qu’ils appellent de leurs vœux. Conscients d’ouvrir un chantier immense, les personnalités majeures du rassemblement calaisien (B. Ensor, O. Decroly, A. Ferrière) mettent à profit le congrès pour fonder une organisation durable qui poursuivra la réflexion : la Ligue internationale pour l’éducation nouvelle. [Reviving the practices of intellectual exchange that began before 1914, education specialists from some fifteen countries, belonging to public and private school organizations, gathered for an original congress held over two weeks in Calais. Beyond the matter that brought them together, dedicated to “the creative expression of children,” educators, theosophists, pedologists and child psychologists, practitioners of New Education and school officials, discussed what could be the significant educational concepts for the new age of humanity they expected. Conscious of launching a huge project, the prominent personalities of the Calais gathering (Béatrice Ensor, Ovide Decroly, and Adolphe Ferrière) built on that project to create a sustainable organization that could carry on discussions: The New Education Fellowship.]

Language: French

DOI: 10.3917/etsoc.163.0043

ISSN: 0014-2204

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

A New Education for a New Era: The Contribution of the Conferences of the New Education Fellowship to the Disciplinary Field of Education 1921–1938

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education, vol. 40, no. 5-6

Pages: 733-755

New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Abstract/Notes: This article examines the role played by the conferences of the New Education Fellowship (NEF) in the emerging disciplinary field of the sciences of education between the two world wars. As Fuchs points out in an article in the present issue, the field of education at this time was being internationalized, and, being an international movement, the field impacted on by the NEF was international in scope.1 As will be seen, the ideas and practices of the new education were mediated by national cultural differences and thus their impact on the disciplinary field varied from nation to nation.2 In addition, the development of the field in terms of journals, conferences and its institutionalization within nations was uneven, which presents further difficulties when trying to evaluate the impact of the NEF's conferences. Much of the following discussion focuses on their impact on the disciplinary field in England though, as will be seen, not exclusively so. One of the distinguishing features of the NEF other than its international scope was that it was a movement that connected lay enthusiasts for the educational reforms associated with the new education with major figures in the developing disciplines of psychology and education, such as Carl Gustav Jung, Jean Piaget and John Dewey. The relation between these lay and professional constituencies is examined and conclusions drawn regarding the professionalizing process in the field and the impact of the conferences on educational research and its institutionalization.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0030923042000293742

ISSN: 0030-9230, 1477-674X

Article

Montessori Preschool Education: 유아교육에 관하여 [Montessori Preschool Education: About Early Childhood Education]

Available from: RISS

Publication: 人間理解 / Journal of Human Understanding and Counseling, vol. 3

Pages: 23-31

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Language: Korean

ISSN: 2005-0860, 2671-5821

Doctoral Dissertation

New Education and Alternative Schools in Taiwan: Educational Research from 1949 to 2005 Taking Special Account of Ten Alternative Schools

Asia, China, East Asia, Taiwan

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Abstract/Notes: Reviewed in Communications 2008/1 // In her dissertation she analyses the efforts of New Education in her home country and compares them to European reform approaches. In this context she analyses and evaluates a large amount of written documents and adds to her literary research especially for the ten alternative schools her own studies at these schools and interviews with the educationalists/teachers responsible. One of the analysed schools was a Montessori school, another one was a Waldorf school. The survey communicates interesting insights and findings about school development in an increasingly democratising Asian country that is scarcely considered in Germany.

Language: English

Published: Münster, Germany, 2005

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