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Article

The Impact of Using Activities Based on the Montessori Approach in Science in the Academic Achievement of Fourth Grade Students

Available from: International Journal of Instruction

Publication: International Journal of Instruction, vol. 12, no. 2

Pages: 695-708

Academic achievement, Montessori method of education, Science - Study and teaching

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigated the effect of using activities based on the Montessori approach in science academic achievement of the fourth grade students. A quasiexperimental design was used wherein the students were equally divided into two groups: the experimental and the control group. Both groups consisted of 31 students. To achieve the aim of the study, Montessori Hall has been set up with six dimensions, and each corner has several shelves comprised different materials used for conducting the science activities. In addition, a teacher guide was prepared to be used by the teacher to implement the Montessori approach for the experimental group. Finally, an achievement test that consisted of seven multiple choice questions (MCQs) and five short answer questions was constructed and administered to both study groups. The results of the study indicated that there were statistically significant differences at the level of significance (P ≤ 0.05) between the mean values of the experimental and the control groups in the academic achievement in favor of the experimental group. In light of the study results, the study recommends holding training workshops for teachers on how to use the Montessori approach in teaching science classes.

Language: English

DOI: 10.29333/iji.2019.12244a

ISSN: 1308-1470, 1694-609X

Doctoral Dissertation

A Comparison of Student Achievement, Student Self-Concept, and Parental Attitude Toward Traditional and Montessori Programs in a Public School Setting

Available from: University of North Texas Digital Library

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigates differences in academic achievement and self-concept of students enrolled in a traditional public school program and a public school Montessori program. The attitudes of parents of students are also compared. The population includes 182 experimental and control kindergarten, first-, second-, and third-grade students in a Texas metropolitan school district. Academic pretest and posttest data include scores on the Bilingual Syntax Measure, Metropolitan Readiness Tests, California Achievement Tests, and the Iowa Test of Basic Skills. The McDaniel-Piers Young Children's Self Concept Scale and the Parent Opinion Survey were also administered. A two-way analysis of covariance was used to analyze pretest and posttest academic achievement and self-concept scores, and to test for possible interaction between the programs and the sex variable. The pretest score was used as the covariate. The means of both parent groups were analyzed using the t test for two independent samples. The .05 level of significance was used to test each hypothesis. First-grade traditional students had significantly higher academic achievement scores than first-grade Montessori students. A significant interaction effect at the first-grade level revealed that traditional males had the highest adjusted mean score for academic achievement and Montessori males had the lowest adjusted mean score. Second-grade traditional students showed a significant increase over second-grade Montessori students in self-concept. No significant difference was found in the attitude of parents of students enrolled in both programs. Conclusions based on this investigation are that more similarities than differences are evident between the two programs, differences in academic achievement and interaction effects and sex appeared at only one grade level, differences in self-concept appeared at only one grade level, and parent attitudes are similar. Recommendations include continuation of the Montessori program evaluation and replication using a larger population, different grade levels, and different socioeconomic levels.

Language: English

Published: Denton, Texas, 1982

Report

Effectiveness of Direct Verbal Instruction on IQ Performance and Achievement in Reading and Arithmetic [Academic Preschool, Champaign, Illinois]

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Americas, Arithmetic, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Literacy, Mathematics education, North America, Reading, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This experiment was based on the assumption that the academic failure of the disadvantaged or middle class child is due to a failure of instruction and that if above-normal learning schedules were maintained, the second year of an enrichment program would not show the customary drop in gains from the first year. The subjects of this study were 43 disadvantaged Negro and white 4-year-olds of high, middle, and low intelligence. Fifteen of the children were placed in an experimental group (I) and 28 in a control group (II). A 2-year program involving a group (III) of middle class 4-year-olds was also conducted, with a control group (IV) consisting of middle class 4-year-olds in a Montessori preschool. Groups I and III received a 2-year experimental program in which rapid attainment of basic academic concepts was emphasized. Group II received a 2-year traditional preschool education. Group I achieved significantly greater Stanford-Binet IQ gains than Group II and maintained them over the 2-year program. Group III children also benefited measureably from the program and demonstrated greater achievement in many areas than Group IV.

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 1966

Doctoral Dissertation

How Social Emotional Development Skills Gained in High Quality Public School Prekindergarten Impact Kindergarten Academic Readiness

Available from: East Tennessee State University

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Abstract/Notes: Longitudinal research has demonstrated that children’s emotional and social skills are linked to their early academic achievement (Wentzel & Asher, 1995). Children who have difficulty paying attention, following directions, getting along with others, and controlling negative emotions like anger and distress do not do as well in school (Arnokl et al., 1999; McClelland et al., 2000). Academic achievement in the early years of schooling appears to be built on a firm foundation of children’s social emotional skills (Ladd, Kochenderfer, & Coleman, 1997; O’Neil et al., 1997). Higher quality prekindergarten programs are associated with the early years of schooling and more positive academic outcomes in children (Burchinal et al., 2000). Investments in early childhood programs by state and federal governments have been made with a goal of improving school readiness for low income children. These investments are based on findings that show a link between program quality and children’s academic outcomes. Studies of model programs show that intensive early childhood services can improve children’s cognitive, 2 academic, and social skills with gains maintained into adulthood (Burchinal, Kainz, & Cai, in press). The purpose of this study was to create knowledge that indicates the influence of the social emotional skills children gain by completing prekindergarten. Schools in Sevier County, Tennessee that have prekindergarten classrooms in place were chosen for this study because kindergarten is the next experience children will have after pre-k. Kindergarten teachers in the schools chosen were purposefully selected as participants. Kindergarten teachers have the opportunity to make comparisons of differences in academic readiness of students who have completed prekindergarten and the students who have not been in a school environment. Kindergarten teachers may be able to conclude from classroom observation of the 2 groups if there is a difference in academic readiness. Home environments with strong parental involvement were most kindergarten teachers’ first choice for early learning and kindergarten preparation. Teachers realization that a strong home environment is not available to all children encouraged them to appreciate having a high quality public school prekindergarten as an alternative. Kindergarten teachers overall perceptions about the readiness of children who enter their classroom after completing prekindergarten were positive.

Language: English

Published: Johnson City, Tennessee, 2013

Report

Reading and Math Achievement for African American Lower Elementary Students in Public Montessori Programs

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Arithmetic - Achievement, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Achievement, Montessori method of education, North America, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: As Montessori programs in public schools expand, Montessori education is becoming available to a more diverse population of American students than ever before. Students of color have a significant presence in public Montessori schools; over a quarter of students in whole-school public Montessori programs are African American. As these programs grow, researchers have increasingly directed their attention to demonstrating that Montessori works in public schools; however, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level, when critical reading and math skills are being established. This study sought to answer the question, how effectively does Montessori instruction promote achievement for African American third grade students in reading and math, compared to similar traditional schools and other public school choice programs?

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 2016

Article

School Environment and Methods of Teaching as Correlates of Language Skills Achievement of Pre–Primary School Pupils in Edo State Nigeria

Available from: Asian Institute of Research

Publication: Education Quarterly Reviews, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 243-251

Africa, Comparative education, Montessori method of education, Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The study investigated the effects of school environment and methods of teaching on language skills achievement of pre – primary school pupils in Edo State. It also investigated the interaction effects of Montessori and played methods and urban and rural environments on pupils' achievement in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Three urban and three rural areas which were selected from two Local Government Areas (LGAs) were used for the study. Six pre - primary schools were purposively selected for the study. A total of 228 kindergartens 2 pupils intact classes were used for the study which lasted for eight weeks. The study was a pretest, posttest, quasi- experimental control group design with independent variables as methods and school location while achievement in Language Skills Achievement Test (LSAT) was the dependent variable. Descriptive statistics and Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) were used to analyze the data obtained while the Multiple Classification Analysis (MCA) was used as post-hoc test for further significance. Three research questions were answered with three hypotheses, tested at 0.05 level of significance. Results showed that the Montessori Method of teaching pre –primary pupils was more effective than the play method. Similarly, urban school pupils achieved higher than their rural counterparts. There was also a significant interaction effect of methods and school location on pupils' academic achievement in Language skills. It was therefore recommended that the Nigerian Government should adopt the Montessori Method as a dominant method of teaching pre – primary school pupils and that pre – primary school owners should provide materials adequately for teaching and learning.

Language: English

DOI: 10.31014/aior.1993.04.03.335

ISSN: 2621-5799, 2657-215X

Article

Montessori Preschool Elevates and Equalizes Child Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study

Available from: Frontiers in Psychology

Publication: Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 8

Pages: 1-19

Academic achievement, Americas, Cognitive development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Longitudinal studies, Montessori method of education, North America, Philosophy of mind, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Quality preschool programs that develop the whole child through age-appropriate socioemotional and cognitive skill-building hold promise for significantly improving child outcomes. However, preschool programs tend to either be teacher-led and didactic, or else to lack academic content. One preschool model that involves both child-directed, freely chosen activity and academic content is Montessori. Here we report a longitudinal study that took advantage of randomized lottery-based admission to two public Montessori magnet schools in a high-poverty American city. The final sample included 141 children, 70 in Montessori and 71 in other schools, most of whom were tested 4 times over 3 years, from the first semester to the end of preschool (ages 3 to 6), on a variety of cognitive and socio-emotional measures. Montessori preschool elevated children's outcomes in several ways. Although not different at the first test point, over time the Montessori children fared better on measures of academic achievement, social understanding, and mastery orientation, and they also reported relatively more liking of scholastic tasks. They also scored higher on executive function when they were 4. In addition to elevating overall performance on these measures, Montessori preschool also equalized outcomes among subgroups that typically have unequal outcomes. First, the difference in academic achievement between lower income Montessori and higher income conventionally schooled children was smaller at each time point, and was not (statistically speaking) significantly different at the end of the study. Second, defying the typical finding that executive function predicts academic achievement, in Montessori classrooms children with lower executive function scored as well on academic achievement as those with higher executive function. This suggests that Montessori preschool has potential to elevate and equalize important outcomes, and a larger study of public Montessori preschools is warranted.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01783

ISSN: 1664-1078

Doctoral Dissertation

The Impact of Multi-Age Instruction on Academic Performance in Mathematics and Reading

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, Americas, Elementary education, Mathematics education, Nongraded schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Teachers and administrators are faced with a basic question when planning for a school year: how should the students be grouped when coming to school? Should students of similar age be together or should students be assigned to multi-age classrooms at the elementary school level? If the multi-age method is chosen, how will academic progress be affected by this instructional strategy? And, in the end, will the students in a multi-age setting perform similar to students who are in traditional group setting on standardized tests? The question of multi-age grouping and academic performance was the focus of this study. The purpose of this study was to compare the academic performance in reading and mathematics of third- and fifth-grade students who have completed three years of multi-age instruction with the academic performance of students in third and fifth grade who have been instructed in the similar-aged traditional classroom. The study compared test scores of students in third and fifth grades using the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment exams. This study determined that there was no significant difference in the scholastic performance between the groups of students who were instructed in the multi-age instructional settings compared to the traditional same age setting. The multi-age setting does allow for positive social settings particularly the opportunity for students to take leadership roles with fellow classmates.

Language: English

Published: Vermillion, South Dakota, 2010

Report

The Effects of Multiage Grouping on Achievement and Self-Concept

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Abstract/Notes: The effects of multi-age grouping on achievement and self-concept were studied. The achievement variables examined were reading and mathematics achievement as measured by the Stanford Achievement Tests. The Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale was used to measure self-concept. The groups studied consisted of single-age and multi-age classrooms of children in grades one through five. No significant differences were found between children in multi-age and single-age classrooms on any of the achievement measures. The multi-age classrooms had significantly higher mean scores on one of the six factors in the self-concept scale--happiness and satisfaction. The multi-age classrooms had slightly but consistently higher mean scores on the other five factor scores and on the total self-concept score but the differences were not significant. (Author)

Language: English

Published: Cortland, New York, Apr 1979

Article

Achievement and Self-Concept in Multiage Classrooms

Publication: Educational Research Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 69-75

Academic achievement, Americas, Comparative education, Elementary education, Language arts, Mathematics education - Achievement, Nongraded schools, North America, Reading - Academic achievement, Self-perception, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Effects of multiage grouping on achievement and self-concept were explored. No significant differences were found between children in multiage and single-age classrooms on any of the achievement measures. Multiage classrooms had higher mean scores on one of the six factors of the self-concept scale, Happiness and Satisfaction.

Language: English

ISSN: 0196-5042

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