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95 results

Master's Thesis (M.A.)

Parents Perceptions of Montessori Schools

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Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, 1977

Doctoral Dissertation

An Examination of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Antibias-Antiracist Curriculm in a Montessori Setting

Available from: Lynn University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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Abstract/Notes: The research consisted of a qualitative case study of three urban public Montessori schools with a population of 51% or more of students of color and a commitment of 2 years or more of CRP-ABAR within a Montessori setting. The theoretical framework used for the study was the critical race theory, which is the conceptual foundation for examining inequities in public education. This research dissertation had a focus on gaining an insight into the perceptions of administrators, teachers, and parents toward CRP-ABAR in Montessori schools by examining the practices in three public Montessori schools. The possible connections to student outcomes, such as behavioral referrals, suspension rates, and academic achievement for students of color were explored to determine if any connections exist between CRP-ABAR and outcomes for students of color within a public Montessori setting. Three major themes emerged of the perceptions of administrators, teachers, and parents about the impact of the CRP-ABAR in a Montessori setting. The CRP-ABAR could be delivered through a curriculum-oriented approach or a systemic-oriented approach and the CRP-ABAR connects to Montessori through peace-global education and the prepared teacher-environment. The CRP-ABAR practices impact students of color primarily through social emotional growth with limited academic outcomes. Even with an intentional focus and diversity training, many non-Black teachers’ perceptions of students of color included deficit theory thinking. Some parents believed racism is being dismantled through the curriculum and celebrations of diversity. Other parents identified some teachers-staff with underpinning instances of biases and insensitivity.

Language: English

Published: Boca Raton, Florida, 2020

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Montessori - What Is It All About?

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This research analyzes parents’ knowledge and perceptions of Montessori education in a dual track school. The school has three Montessori classrooms and nineteen traditional classrooms. Through surveys, the researcher gathered data on parents’ current perceptions. She then implemented Montessori educational workshops on core Montessori principles. The researcher also conducted five interviews to learn more about the various perceptions in the school. Finally, through a final survey the researcher was able gather data to show if using parent workshops changed parents’ perceptions on Montessori and offered more in-depth knowledge. The researcher found that a large majority of parents were on board with Montessori even though they had misunderstandings of different aspects of the method. Parents found the workshops helpful and were interested in going to more workshops. Based on the results gathered, the researcher found the need to do more parent education workshops in the next year.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of Anti-Bias Literature Small Groups on Children's Understanding of Themselves, their Families, and Others

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research study was to explore how sharing anti-bias children’s books in literature small groups in a lower elementary Montessori class affects children’s perceptions of and ability to communicate about themselves, their families, and others, as well as the classmates with whom they choose to associate. The sample studied in this research was a class of 20 children aged six to nine at a private Montessori school located in a small town adjacent to a large Midwestern city. Data was collected through pre and post oral interviews, written reading reflection worksheets, and daily teacher observations of children’s work and play partners. The study found that anti-bias literature small groups are an effective way to improve children’s perceptions of themselves and their ability to communicate about human difference. More research is needed about how to improve children’s perceptions of their families and their ability to communicate about human similarity. Additionally, a longer intervention period and refined data collection tool are recommended in order to learn more about the impact of anti-bias literature small groups on children’s choice of work and play partners.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Doctoral Dissertation

Imported Education: Investigating Educational Innovation Through a Case Study of a Montessori School in Thailand

Available from: University of Illinois - IDEALS

Asia, Southeast Asia, Thailand

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Abstract/Notes: This study investigates the dynamics of importing an innovative educational program across a cultural boundary. It is a case study of a particular Montessori School in Thailand that has practiced Montessori education for over sixteen years. The research's aim is to explore the process of adoption and adaptation as the program evolved, and to examine the cultural and social factors in Thailand that may be related to the adaptations. A combination of in-depth interviews and school/classroom observations was used in this study. The school was observed for a period of three months, and interviews were conducted with the director, twelve teachers, and eight parents. The method of triangulation and crosschecking were employed to ensure the validity and accuracy of the findings. The study explored in detail the various historical stages of the evolution of the school and analyzed them as involving different phases and types of changes, adaptations and conflicts. Much of the analysis relied on the perceptions of the director. These include her ideals and personal evolution with the program, her perceptions of difficulties as the program evolved, her perceptions of teachers' and 08 December 2012 Page 13 of 17 ProQuest parents' relationships to Montessori education, and her accounts of many decisions that she had to make. In addition, the teachers' feelings and attitudes regarding their work and the parents' perspectives and attitudes toward the school and education of their children also informed the analysis. The process of evolution of the imported educational method is conceptualized into four partially overlapping phases--Transportation, Translation, Transformation, and Nationalization. Aspects of program's implementation are classified into three features, representing three ways in which the existing cultural values and social expectations interacted with the program. These include adaptations to preserve the host's cultural values, adaptations to ensure the survival of the program, and conflicts of values and norms experienced by the teachers in their work at the school and by the parents in their vision of education for their children.

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 2002

Doctoral Thesis

Impact of Education for Sustainability at a Montessori Primary School: From Silos to Systems Thinking

Available from: Murdoch University Research Repository

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Oceania, Sustainability

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Abstract/Notes: This research investigated Education for Sustainability (EfS) at an independent Montessori primary school, located in the Perth metropolitan area of Western Australia. A longitudinal case study involving analysis of data from a twenty year period was conducted to determine the effectiveness of EfS. Historical information about EfS at the school from 1990 to 2005 was examined, with the main focus of the study being on the impact of the Australian Sustainable Schools Initiative (AuSSI) between 2005 and 2009. AuSSI promotes a whole school, whole systems thinking approach to EfS. Three school-based issues in EfS were studied. Firstly, the research aimed to determine what elements of EfS were in operation in the school prior to involvement in AuSSI. Secondly, student outcomes including engagement with whole systems thinking, attitudes and values, knowledge and understandings, and skills and behaviours related to EfS, were investigated during the first five years of participation in AuSSI. Thirdly, teacher perceptions of the EfS program, including engagement with whole systems thinking, were examined during this same time period. A case study approach was employed to enable in-depth investigation of EfS in the life of the school prior to, during and post implementation of AuSSI. This approach facilitated revelation of participants' lived experiences, their perceptions and understandings of EfS, as well as detailed information about student outcomes in EfS. Case study methodology was also compatible with the culture and processes of the participating school and provided an opportunity for utilising a whole systems thinking approach. Data was gathered from a range of sources, through surveys, interviews, observation and document analysis over a five year period. The total participants included eleven teachers and seventy five students. The research identified particular antecedents of EfS in the Montessori Method of education that existed in the school prior to AuSSI, including the whole child approach, together with the Montessori learning environment, curriculum and values. Following participation in AuSSI, student attitudes and values, knowledge and understandings, and skills and behaviours related to EfS were enhanced for all year levels. However, after three years when specific EfS actions and projects ceased, student EfS outcomes were limited. Furthermore, students’ thinking and behaviour indicated a ‘silo’, rather than whole systems thinking approach to EfS. Teachers perceived the EfS program as highly effective in the initial three years after joining AuSSI. Key elements that enhanced EfS included EfS staff champions who had access to EfS networks, leadership support, and active school community involvement in all EfS processes. However, after three years of being an AuSSI school, the culmination of reduced leadership support for EfS, lack of staff training, vague designation of staff with EfS responsibilities and inadequate community involvement, resulted in cessation of the EfS program. Teacher perceptions on whole systems thinking revealed alignment between Montessori philosophy, EfS and whole system thinking was more in theory than in practice. Through an in-depth longitudinal case study of a school this research highlighted the importance of whole school EfS professional learning, embedding EfS and whole systems thinking across the curriculum at all year levels, whole school support, and the usefulness of a sustainability continuum that recognizes the complex, dynamic interplay of issues involved in a school’s EfS journey. It is strongly recommended improvements to pre-service teacher education in EfS are implemented, and a review of the AuSSI toolkit is conducted to refine EfS evaluation processes and to target the specific EfS needs of teachers at different stages of schooling, as well as to enhance understanding and implementation of the whole systems thinking approach. Finally, EfS professional learning for all school staff in all schools is warranted to enhance depth of EfS engagement.

Language: English

Published: Perth, Australia, 2012

Doctoral Dissertation

An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Korean Montessori Teacher Training Program as Perceived by Montessori Teachers and Parents of Montessori-Educated Children

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: During the past ten years, a total of 3,642 teachers and administrators have attended the Korean Montessori Teacher Training Program (KMTTP). A sample of Montessori teachers (n = 261) and Korean parents (n = 375) from 32 Korean Montessori schools located in the major cities of Korea were surveyed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of this teacher preparation program. The EXPECTATIONS AND GOAL ATTAINMENT QUESTIONNAIRE (EGAQ), designed by the researcher, was the instrumentation used to conduct this study. Major findings demonstrated that 74.5 percent of the teachers surveyed indicated that their main reasons for attending the KMTTP were to increase their professional competency and their knowledge of child development through Montessori philosophy. The correlation between teachers' levels of satisfaction with their preparation and perceived effectiveness of the training program was higher (r =.29, p $<$.05) than between their levels of satisfaction with the program and their perceptions of their preparedness after completion of training (r =.18, p $<$.05). Significant differences existed between perceived effectiveness of the KMTTP and teachers' ages, positions, and years of experience. Older teachers and those with more advanced teaching positions expressed greater satisfaction with the program. Teachers indicated that, upon completion of the KMTTP, they felt more prepared in, than knowledgeable of, Montessori educational methodology. From the parent perspective, the most frequently cited reason (74.3%) for sending their child to a Montessori School was to provide a learning environment that nurtured their child's interpersonal growth. A majority of the parents (58.5%) were very satisfied with the Montessori experience; no parents were dissatisfied or very dissatisfied. In correlating the effectiveness of Montessori education with specific outcomes, parents indicated highest levels of satisfaction in the areas of "concentration" and "academic achievement." A majority of the teachers surveyed (52.8%) encouraged the implementation of the Montessori Teacher Training Program in neighboring countries, with 42.1 percent strongly encouraging implementation. This study demonstrated the need for further development and improvement in the area of Montessori teacher training in Korea.

Language: English

Published: San Francisco, California, 1994

Book Section

Alcuni approcci al concetto di numero

Book Title: La Formazione Matematica

Pages: 29-38

Imagination, Perceptions, percezione

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Language: Italian

Published: [Firenze]: La Nuova Italia, 1970

Article

Making Sense of Every Child

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 4

Pages: 40-47

Asperger's syndrome in children, Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Attention-deficit-disordered children, Autism in children, Children with disabilities, Depression in children, Inclusive education, Oppositional defiant disorder in children, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: This article presents an example of two boys who have received a list of diagnoses including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), autism, Asperger's syndrome, Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), and clinical depression. Both boys received a variety of interventions ranging from behavior modification plans to counseling and medication, but it was not until their behaviors were examined from a sensory integration perspective that a clear, consistent picture of each of them began to emerge. Sensory integration (SI) is neurobiological activity within our bodies, defined as the way the central nervous system processes information from the senses. Sensory integration is the brain and nervous system's ability to organize the sensory information that bombard a person's nervous systems. When sensations flow into the brain in an organized or integrated manner, these sensations can be used by an individual to form perceptions and create learning experiences. Dysfunction occurs when the nervous system is unable to integrate incoming information smoothly, resulting in the misinterpretation of information and roadblocks to creating appropriate perceptions, behaviors, and learning experiences. In this article, the authors explain how sensory integration affects behavior and the interventions to promote sensory integration for all children. (Contains 1 table.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation

An Exploratory Study on the Effectiveness of Montessori Constructs and Traditional Teaching Methodology as Change Agents to Increase Academic Achievement of Elementary Black Students

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, African American children, African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Black students consistently underachieve academically in comparison to White students. To minimize the achievement gap between Black students and White students, some experts advocate the use of differentiated instruction as an alternative methodology to teach underachieving students. Differentiated instruction is predicated on teaching students based on their learning abilities and/or learning preferences. The differentiated instructional model examined in this study combined traditional teaching methodology with specific Montessori stage two and stage three constructs. This exploratory qualitative study examined the impact that Montessori constructs combined with traditional teaching methods had on academic achievement of Black students in grades four and five in an inner city school in Dallas County, Texas. The study further explored the sample’s perceptions of and preferences for the combined teaching methodology. The sample group had been exposed to the differentiated teaching model evaluated in the study. Disaggregated 2007 and 2008 TAKS results from the Texas Education Agency were obtained to compare the school’s fourth and fifth grade Black students’ achievement to their cohort groups in the district and in the state. The TAKS data comparisons found variability in performance among the groups in each of the subject areas assessed by TAKS. Qualitative data from a Likert Scale, multiple choice questions, questionnaires, written essay, and interviews were obtained from the participants to examine the students’ perceptions of and preferences for the combined teaching methodology. Data responses were analyzed and themes were developed to determine black students’ preferences for teaching, learning, and factors that contribute to learning. The findings of this study imply that future use of a differentiated instructional model that combines traditional teaching methodology and specific Montessori constructs and principles might be effective in improving Black student achievement.

Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2009

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