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531 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effects of a Montessori-Based Nutrition Education Program with Fruit and Vegetable Taste Testing on Intake, Preferences, and Nutrition Knowledge of Preschool and Kindergarten Children

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vol. 120, no. 9, Supplement

Pages: A50

Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori-based interventions (MBI), North America, Nutrition education, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Learn how a theory-driven Montessori-based intervention can be used to increase student nutrition knowledge, fruit and vegetable intake and preferences

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.jand.2020.06.147

ISSN: 2212-2672

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Evaluating Student Food Selections After a Nutrition Education Intervention in a Montessori Community School

Available from: The Annals of Family Medicine

Publication: The Annals of Family Medicine, vol. 20, no. Supplement 1

Pages: Submission 3129

Montessori schools, Nutrition education

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Abstract/Notes: Context: Schools are unique sites for nutrition education interventions due to their ability to provide educational activities as well as meals, allowing for observation of behavior change. Nutrition education and physical activity awareness programs implemented in the school setting have the potential to positively impact students’ eating habits. Eating habits are developed at a young age, but few efforts have been made to deliver and assess education interventions in the pre-K through grade 3 age group. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate student food selections before and after a nutrition education intervention was implemented in a Montessori school. Human Subjects Review: Approved as non-regulated research by the UTSW IRB. Study Design: Retrospective exploratory analysis. Setting: A single Montessori community school with students in grades pre-K through grade 3. Instrument: Aggregate lunch food selection data, including total food items offered and total food items left over, via daily production records. Main Outcome Measures: Records were collected from three school years to compare the food acceptability – the percent of food item taken from the total offered - of fruit (F), vegetable (V), F&V, 0% milk, 1% milk, and all milks before and after the implementation of the intervention program. Food acceptability served as a proxy for food consumption. Results: In all years, fruit (82.88%) and all milks (81.74%) were well accepted by students, but vegetables (62.00%) were not. The study found that from year 1 to year 2, there were statistically significant (p <0.0001) decreases in intake in all categories. This trend continued when comparing year 1 to year 3. Conclusions: Prior studies show that even in successful interventions, when vegetable or F&V intake does increase, changes are minimal. These findings corroborate the difficulties prior studies have demonstrated in changing students’ food selections for the better, particularly regarding vegetable consumption. This analysis of production records showed a decline in acceptability of foods over the three years. It is unclear if these changes are directly related to the instructional program, due to the presence of confounding factors. Future studies should attempt to reevaluate nutrition education and subsequently conduct a plate-waste study for a more accurate representation of food consumption before and after an intervention.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1370/afm.20.s1.3129

ISSN: 1544-1709, 1544-1717

Article

A Nutrition Education Program for Children–A Curriculum Overview

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 26, no. 1

Pages: 12–15

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Language: English

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

How Does Parent Nutrition Education Change What Children Bring for Lunch?

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The intent of this action research was to see if parent nutrition education changed what parents packed in their children’s lunches. This study was conducted at a Colorado Montessori school enrolling infants through kindergartners. Data sources included teacher observation before and after the nutrition classes, a pre-class parental survey on nutrition knowledge and topic needs, a teacher journal, and a post-class evaluation. Results showed that after the class, five out of seven students’ lunches changed 20 to 60%. Parents incorporated ideas learned from the class and ways to entice picky eaters. Based on this action research project, the school is implementing a hot lunch program. I initiated a monthly food club to teach parents ways to cook multiple meals from a basic staple, explore ethnic cuisines, and share recipes.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Implementing Fitness and Nutrition Education in Urban, Underserved, Community-Based Montessori Schools: Challenges and Lessons Learned

Available from: Project MUSE

Publication: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action, vol. 16, no. 3

Pages: 339-348

Americas, Lumin Education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Nutrition education, Physical education for children, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Background: Few studies have discussed school-based health programs in Montessori education. Lumin has a network of Montessori elementary schools serving mainly lower income families in Dallas, Texas. Since 2015, our medical school has partnered with Lumin to design and implement fitness and nutrition curricula adherent to Montessori principles., Objectives: To describe a novel Montessori school-based health program and determine avenues for improvement based on lessons learned., Methods: Led by medical students with guidance from faculty mentors, the program was developed collaboratively with Lumin leaders based on a critical need in their community and shaped with results from a cross-sectional health needs assessment among Lumin families. Data were collected to measure the impact of the program and a program evaluation was conducted after 5 years of operation to explore curriculum refinement., Results and Lessons Learned: The greatest challenges were recruitment of student volunteers, scheduling and coordination, and garnering community interest for secondary activities (e.g., health fairs)., Conclusions: Despite challenges, this partnership has resulted in a successful program that relies on faculty and student volunteers, incorporates community-based participatory research and service learning concepts, and follows Montessori principles.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1353/cpr.2022.0051

ISSN: 1557-055X

Article

Nutrition: Education for Life

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 17, no. 2

Pages: 40–42

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori Preschool Education: 유아교육에 관하여 [Montessori Preschool Education: About Early Childhood Education]

Available from: RISS

Publication: 人間理解 / Journal of Human Understanding and Counseling, vol. 3

Pages: 23-31

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Language: Korean

ISSN: 2005-0860, 2671-5821

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Comparison of the Intuitive Mathematic Skills of Preschool Children Who Take Education According to Ministry of National Education Preschool Education Program and Montessori Approach

Available from: IISTE - International Knowledge Sharing Platform

Publication: International Journal of Scientific and Technological Research, vol. 6, no. 6

Pages: 167

Asia, Comparative education, Mathematics education, Middle East, Montessori method of education, Preschool children, Preschool education, Turkey, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This study analyzed intuitive mathematics abilities of preschool children and to ascertain whether there was a difference between children who were educated according to the Ministry of National Education (MoNE) preschool education program and the Montessori approach. It was also examined whether the intuitive mathematics abilities of the children who were educated according to the MoNE program and Montessori approach showed a significant difference according to variables of gender, duration of pre-school education, and educational levels of parents. The study sample of the study consisted of 121 children (56 girls, 65 boys) aged between 60-72 months. The data was collected via “Personal Information Form” and “Intuitive Mathematics Ability Scale” developed by Güven (2001). Intuitive mathematical abilities of children who were educated according to the Montessori program were more developed compared to those of children educated according to MoNE program. There was no significant difference in intuitive mathematical abilities according to duration of preschool education, education levels of parents. As a result of the study, a significant difference was observed in the intuitive math abilities of the children trained according to the MoNE program in favor of the girls, whereas no significant difference was observed trained according to the Montessori approach. The results are discussed in light of the relevant literature.

Language: Turkish

DOI: 10.7176/JSTR/6-06-12

ISSN: 2422-8702

Article

Une éducation pour une ère nouvelle: le congrès international d’éducation de Calais (1921) [Education for a new era: the international congress of education in Calais (1921)]

Available from: CAIRN

Publication: Les Études Sociales, vol. 163, no. 1

Pages: 43-77

Europe, France, New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: Renouant avec les pratiques d’échanges intellectuels d’avant 1914, des spécialistes de l’éducation d’une quinzaine de pays, appartenant à l’enseignement public comme au secteur privé, tiennent un congrès original, durant deux semaines, à Calais. Au-delà du thème qui les rassemble, « l’expression créatrice de l’enfant », éducateurs théosophes, pédologues et psychologues de l’enfant, praticiens des écoles nouvelles et représentants de l’institution scolaire débattent d’une conception de l’éducation pertinente pour l’ère nouvelle de l’humanité qu’ils appellent de leurs vœux. Conscients d’ouvrir un chantier immense, les personnalités majeures du rassemblement calaisien (B. Ensor, O. Decroly, A. Ferrière) mettent à profit le congrès pour fonder une organisation durable qui poursuivra la réflexion : la Ligue internationale pour l’éducation nouvelle. [Reviving the practices of intellectual exchange that began before 1914, education specialists from some fifteen countries, belonging to public and private school organizations, gathered for an original congress held over two weeks in Calais. Beyond the matter that brought them together, dedicated to “the creative expression of children,” educators, theosophists, pedologists and child psychologists, practitioners of New Education and school officials, discussed what could be the significant educational concepts for the new age of humanity they expected. Conscious of launching a huge project, the prominent personalities of the Calais gathering (Béatrice Ensor, Ovide Decroly, and Adolphe Ferrière) built on that project to create a sustainable organization that could carry on discussions: The New Education Fellowship.]

Language: French

DOI: 10.3917/etsoc.163.0043

ISSN: 0014-2204

Article

Achieving Inclusive Education in Early Childhood: From the Viewpoint of an Affinity Between Inclusive Education and Montessori Education

Publication: Montessori Kyōiku / モンテッソーリ教育 [Montessori Education], no. 49

Pages: 100-113

Asia, East Asia, Inclusive education, Japan, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This is an article from Montessori Education, a Japanese language periodical published by the Japan Association Montessori.

Language: Japanese

ISSN: 0913-4220

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