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921 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Experiential Teaching Methods to Promote Consumption of Whole Grains, Fruits and Vegetables, and Nutritious Beverages by Elementary School Children: A Montessori Example

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 109, no. 9, Supplement

Pages: A56

Americas, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education, Nutrition education, Nutrition education, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Participants will be able to describe experiential educational methods that can be used to increase consumption of whole grain foods, fruits and vegetables, and nutritious beverages among lower elementary students.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.jada.2009.06.173

ISSN: 0002-8223

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Care Givers’ Knowledge of Integrating the Montessori; Indigenous Communicative Teaching Methods and Reggio Emilia in Early Child Care Education

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: AFRREV IJAH: An International Journal of Arts and Humanities, vol. 6, no. 3

Pages: 127-140

Africa, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Sub-Saharan Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: Studies have identified the mismatch between theory and practice as the main reason for gap between the intended and the achieved curriculum objectives. The early childcare education is no exception. Theories of child development emphasize that children learn best through play and self-discovery. Unfortunately, research results revealed that caregivers do not adhere to the prescribed pedagogy and since pedagogy stems from the theory of the nature of the learner and how he learns; it implies that failure to use the right pedagogy adversely affects the achievement of the objectives. The study therefore sought to identify caregivers’ knowledge of integrating Montessori, Indigenous Communicative Teaching and Reggio Emilia approaches in Early Childhood Care Education in Owerri Educational zone, Imo State, Nigeria. The study is a descriptive survey with the population comprising all caregivers in government approved pre-primary schools totalling 119, using a 39-item questionnaire and percentages as well as chi square for data analyses. Results showed that respondents were not knowledgeable. Recommendations include the need to monitor caregivers to ensure compliance to stipulated policy.Keywords: childcare education, caregivers

Language: English

DOI: 10.4314/ijah.v6i3.11

ISSN: 2227-5452

Article

Baroness Dedee Vranyczany and the New Child – Beginnings of the Montessori Teaching Methods in Croatia

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 2005, no. 1

Pages: 28–32

Croatia, Dedee Vranyczany - Biographic sources, Europe, Southern Europe, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Developmental Theory and Teaching Methods: A Pilot Study of a Teacher Education Program

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Elementary School Journal, vol. 93, no. 4

Pages: 417–441

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1086/461732

ISSN: 1554-8279, 0013-5984

Article

Montessori Teaching Methods Saluted in Schools Today

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: Chicago Tribune (Chicago, Illinois)

Pages: N13

Americas, Frances Sivak - Biographic sources, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori system, an educational program that promises "freedom without license," is being saluted today as 50 schools in the Chicago area observe Illinois Montessori Day.

Language: English

ISSN: 1085-6706

Book Section

The Teaching Methods Employed in Children's Houses: Physical Growth; The Environment; Practical Observations; Discipline and Liberty; The Difficulty of Discipline in Schools; Independence; The More Useless Help Is, the More It Is a Hindrance to the Development of Natural Powers; Reward and Punishments for Our Children; Freedom to Develop

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 41-64

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Article

Outline of Teaching Methods and Applications for Archaeological Studies of the Anasazi in the Montessori Elementary Classroom

Publication: AMI Elementary Alumni Association Newsletter, vol. 19, no. 1

Pages: insert

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

The Relationship Between Self-Concept and Stress of Elementary School Teachers Using Traditional and Montessori Methods of Teaching

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-concept and perceived levels of stress in the teaching profession at the elementary school level. The subjects of the study were teachers from two communities--Romulus, Michigan and Buffalo, New York. The subjects were chosen by the schools in which they taught and by the methods of teaching which they used. One-half of the total number of the subjects used traditional methods of teaching and one-half of the total number of the subjects used the Montessori Method of teaching. The responses of these teachers were gathered during the 1981 winter school term. The instruments used to gather the data for the study were the Tennessee Self Concept Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and a personal data questionnaire. The levels of self-concept of the subjects were taken as indicated by the means of the total positive scores of the Tennessee Self Concept Scale. The levels of the subjects' perceived stress were taken as indicated by the means from the Maslach Burnout Inventory in the areas of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal achievement. Pearson product-moment correlations were found to determine if a significant relationship existed between self-concept and the perceived stress of the subjects. Demographic data from the questionnaire were used to divide the subjects into categories which were investigated for significant differences. One way analyses of variance were performed of the self-concept and stress means of the categories to determine if significant differences existed. Statistical significance was chosen at the 0.05 alpha level. For the thirteen null hypotheses formulated and tested, it was concluded that the subjects indicating higher self-concept means, as measured by the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, also indicated lower stress means, as indicated on the Maslach Burnout Inventory, in the areas of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and higher means in the area of personal achievement. Null hypotheses formulated indicating no significant differences of stress or self-concept when the subjects were categorized by teaching methods, years of formal education, number of years of teaching experience, classroom racial dominance, number of students in the classroom, or marital status were all accepted. No significant differences were found at the 0.05 alpha level. The subjects of this study were shown to be similar in life style, education, and work environments. Further studies might bring to light differences if more varied teachers, teaching methods, and levels of education were taken into consideration. Replication of the study may also provide valuable information if performed with subjects from independent schools. A search for areas which the teachers feel are stress producing may also contribute to significant research.

Language: English

Published: Columbus, Ohio, 1981

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

School Environment and Methods of Teaching as Correlates of Language Skills Achievement of Pre–Primary School Pupils in Edo State Nigeria

Available from: Asian Institute of Research

Publication: Education Quarterly Reviews, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 243-251

Africa, Comparative education, Montessori method of education, Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The study investigated the effects of school environment and methods of teaching on language skills achievement of pre – primary school pupils in Edo State. It also investigated the interaction effects of Montessori and played methods and urban and rural environments on pupils' achievement in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Three urban and three rural areas which were selected from two Local Government Areas (LGAs) were used for the study. Six pre - primary schools were purposively selected for the study. A total of 228 kindergartens 2 pupils intact classes were used for the study which lasted for eight weeks. The study was a pretest, posttest, quasi- experimental control group design with independent variables as methods and school location while achievement in Language Skills Achievement Test (LSAT) was the dependent variable. Descriptive statistics and Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) were used to analyze the data obtained while the Multiple Classification Analysis (MCA) was used as post-hoc test for further significance. Three research questions were answered with three hypotheses, tested at 0.05 level of significance. Results showed that the Montessori Method of teaching pre –primary pupils was more effective than the play method. Similarly, urban school pupils achieved higher than their rural counterparts. There was also a significant interaction effect of methods and school location on pupils' academic achievement in Language skills. It was therefore recommended that the Nigerian Government should adopt the Montessori Method as a dominant method of teaching pre – primary school pupils and that pre – primary school owners should provide materials adequately for teaching and learning.

Language: English

DOI: 10.31014/aior.1993.04.03.335

ISSN: 2621-5799, 2657-215X

Article

Humanistic Methods in Foreign Language Teaching

Available from: Central and Eastern European Online Library

Publication: Euromentor Journal: Studies about Education, vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 71-79

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The psychological research and changes occurred in pedagogical thinking have led to new methods in foreign language teaching called “humanistic methods” or “fringe methods” which focus on some aspects neglected by the traditional strategies: feelings, emotions, interpersonal relationships: suggestopedia, first an experimental method belonging to suggestology, has become a psychological method of teaching and learning foreign languages based mainly on indirect suggestion which appeals to a peripheral subliminal; the silent way, which stems from the trend initiated by the Italian specialist in pedagogy Maria Montessori is based on the fact that the process of learning a foreign language is a natural one, which children perform involuntarily; cooperative learning, whose roots are in the counseling techniques of psychotherapy, is greatly based on group dynamics; the total physical response, which originates in the action-based methods, refers to the learner’s reaction, to the instructions received from the teacher and it has been a successful method to teach foreign language for children.

Language: English

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