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441 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Between Action and Theory: A Check List for Teachers Self-Evaluation in Montessori Contexts

Available from: Firenze University Press

Publication: Formare [Form@re], vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 322-331

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Abstract/Notes: The article presents the first monitoring phase following the introduction of the Montessori Method in three primary school classes of the public sector in Trentino, Northern Italy. In this context we are proposing a check list developed to observe teachers and children actions into experimental classes, with the aim of monitoring the gap between implemented educational choices and the theoretical references proposed by Maria Montessori. The check list points offer a supportive self-evaluation tool for teachers in Montessori public school contexts. [Tra l’agito e il dichiarato: una griglia osservativa per l’autovalutazione del docente nelle classi a metodo MontessoriIl contributo presenta la prima fase di monitoraggio dell’esperienza a metodo Montessori in tre classi di scuola primaria pubblica trentina. In questo contesto viene presentata una check list osservativa costruita per osservare le azioni di insegnanti e bambini all’interno delle classi sperimentali, con l’intento di monitorare lo scarto tra le scelte didattiche messe in atto e i riferimenti teorici proposti da Maria Montessori nell’ambito della scuola primaria. La check list proposta intende offrire uno strumento in grado di orientare il processo di autovalutazione dell’insegnante in contesti di scuola pubblica ad indirizzo montessoriano.]

Language: Italian

DOI: 10.13128/formare-23930

ISSN: 1825-7321

Doctoral Dissertation

The Problem of Self-Activity in Modern Educational Theory with Special Reference to Rousseau, Harris, Dewey, and Montessori

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Language: English

Published: New York City, New York, 1925

Article

Self-Government in Schools; The Education of the WIll (A Montessorian's Conception of Self-Government)

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: New Era, vol. 2, no. 6

Pages: 176-178

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Language: English

ISSN: 0028-5048

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Record-Keeping on Teacher Self-Efficacy and Student Self-Regulation in the Primary Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This paper examines the effects of teacher use of an online record-keeping system on teacher self-efficacy and student self-regulation behavior. Four teachers and thirty-four students between the ages of three and six years old participated in this seven-week study in one of the few Montessori schools in a Latin American capital city. Pre- and post-study data collection methods included a teacher self-efficacy questionnaire and small group discussion, as well as use of the Head-to-Toe Test, a means of measuring children’s self-regulation behavior. For seven weeks, teachers used the program Transparent Classroom to record lessons, inform their lesson presentations, and track overall student progress. Through weekly classroom observations, child behaviors hindering and encouraging normalization were tracked with a tally sheet. Data showed increases in both teacher self-efficacy and student self-regulation, especially in children with the lowest pre-study scores, who saw dramatic gains. These results show the use of a record-keeping system may be a means of increasing achievement and satisfaction in both students and teachers.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Using Self-Monitoring to Increase Self-Regulation in Young Children

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of a self-monitoring system on the social-emotional behaviors of children in a mixed-age early childhood classroom. The study took place over the course of six weeks at a public Montessori school with twelve participants ranging from ages 4 to 7. Data was collected using a teacher questionnaire, observation tallies, teacher notes, and student feedback. Findings indicated that disruptive behaviors increased and children’s ability to communicate their emotions and recognize emotions in others only slightly increased. Although the results displayed minimal changes in students' ability to self-regulate, some children appeared to become more aware of their feelings and utilized effective strategies for sharing how they felt and improving their mood. Further research might focus on a smaller group of children that need assistance with self-regulation or include an easier method of obtaining student feedback.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Doctoral Dissertation

A Comparison of Traditional vs. Montessori Education in Relation to Children's Self-Esteem, Self-Efficacy, and Prosocial Behavior

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, Americas, Caribbean, Comparative education, Elementary education, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori schools, Puerto Rico, Student attitudes

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Abstract/Notes: The present study compares elementary school children from Traditional and Montessori programs. The purpose is to investigate how different educational philosophies and teaching methods affect perceived levels of self-esteem, self-efficacy, prosocial behavior and aggressive behavior in children. The participants in this study consisted of second through sixth grade students who were attending Montessori and Traditional schools since the age of five, or earlier. All children completed the Washington Self-Description Questionnaire (WSDQ), three subscales of the Children's Multi-dimensional Self-Efficacy Scales (i.e., academic achievement, self-regulated learning, & social), the Physical and Verbal Aggression Scale, and the Prosocial Behavior Scale. No significant differences were revealed between the Montessori and Traditional programs in relation to the children's perceived levels of self-esteem, self-efficacy for academic achievement, self-efficacy for self-regulated learning, social self-efficacy, or prosocial behavior. However, the Montessori children reported significantly lower levels of physical/verbal aggression than the Traditional children. Moreover, as Montessori children develop a heightened ability to work within a group of peers, they seem to develop lower levels of physical/verbal aggression, which was not found among Traditional children. Furthermore, Montessori children's perceived ability to make and keep friends of the same gender was found to significantly improve with increased years in the program, which was not found in the Traditional method. For Montessori children, their perceived ability to work together in a group was found to be positively associated with heightened levels of self-efficacy for academic achievement and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Furthermore, the Montessori children's levels of self-esteem were correlated significantly with their perceived levels of self-efficacy for academic achievement and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Although Traditional children were also found to gain self-efficacy for self-regulated learning through working together at young ages, as they proceed to higher grade levels, their self-efficacy for self-regulated learning decreased.

Language: English

Published: San Juan, Puerto Rico, 2002

Book

Self-Reliance: A Practical and Informal Discussion of Methods of Teaching Self-Reliance, Initiative and Responsibility to Modern Children

Available from: Internet Archive

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Language: English

Published: Indianapolis, Indiana: Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1916

Book

Self-Reliance: A Practical and Informal Discussion of Methods of Teaching Self-Reliance, Initiative and Responsibility to Modern Children

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Language: English

Published: New York, New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1929

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Help Me Help Myself: The Role of Helper Flags as Tools for Self-Regulation

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Autonomy in children, Children and adults, Montessori method of education, Teacher-student relationships

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this action research was to determine if using flags, created as tools for signaling for help, was an effective way to develop persistence and encourage children to complete their chosen work. The study was conducted in a preschool classroom at a private Montessori school. Participants included 15 children aged three to five and three teachers. Data was collected in the form of student interviews, tallies, and observations made during the period of research. The results indicated that the helper flags increased the children’s persistence with their work and increased the likelihood they would complete their chosen work. Therefore, it was concluded that the flags were effective tools for the children. Additionally, the flags proved to be a useful classroom management technique. However, because the research was conducted at the beginning of the school year in a class of children new to the Montessori environment, it is unclear whether or not the results would apply to other classrooms. Therefore, further research is recommended in other classroom environments and at a later point in the school year.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2014

Article

Know Your Senses, Know Yourself: Connecting the Self and Nature

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 3

Pages: 46-49

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Abstract/Notes: To glide effortlessly across any body of water, regardless of conditions, the sailor studies the movement, speed, and directional changes of the wind. After much practice, the connection to the wind becomes a part of the sailor's environment; it becomes second nature. A child sailing by himself or with a crew of peers in a large lake is just one example of children learning to connect with their environment through risk taking.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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