Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

226 results

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Instructional Leadership Practices of Montessori Public School Principals: The Montessori Teachers' Perspective

Available from: American Montessori Society

See More

Language: English

Published: Lubbock, Texas, 1994

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

An Examination of Implementation Practices in Montessori Early Childhood Education

Available from: American Montessori Society

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study examined to what extent Montessori early childhood education programs in one geographical region of the United States could be classified into homogeneous clusters based on teachers’ reported practices associated with Montessori education. Once identified, the characteristics defining each subgroup were described, and factors supporting or hindering the implementation of recommended practices were examined. Of particular interest was whether the teachers were intentionally or inadvertently making changes to the model, and if modifications were being made, whether these were due to situational factors or to viewpoints that differed from Montessori’s perspectives. Teachers’ beliefs about managing and motivating children were also assessed in relation to their interpretation of the Montessori method in order to examine what role, if any these beliefs played in shaping classroom practices.

Language: English

Published: Berkeley, California, 2004

Book Section

Montessori Language Practices Meet the Needs of All Learners: The Montessori Early Childhood Inclusive Classroom: Creating a Cherished Experience

Available from: Rowman and Littlefield

Book Title: The Inclusive Classroom: Creating a Cherished Experience through Montessori

Pages: 83-102

Children with disabilities, Classroom environments, Inclusive education, Language acquisition, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Prepared environment, Special education

See More

Language: English

Published: Lanham, Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-4758-5635-4

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Exploration of Implementation Practices of Montessori Education in Mainland China

Available from: Nature

Publication: Humanities and Social Sciences Communications, vol. 8

Pages: Article 250

Three-hour work cycle, Work periods

See More

Abstract/Notes: This descriptive research work highlights the implementation practices of Montessori education in mainland China and the concerns over Montessori education’s localization in mainland China. Localization can be understood as the adaptive process Montessori education undergoes in order to fit within Chinese culture. Two hundred and ten in-service Montessori teachers and administrators in China were surveyed to discover information concerning implementation practices in the following areas: mixed-aged classrooms, whether classrooms were co-teaching, student-to-teacher ratios, and morning and afternoon work cycles. The study found that the majority of classrooms were mixed-aged, reflecting high-fidelity Montessori practices. However, it also found that classrooms are co-teaching, have lower student–teacher ratios, and shortened work cycles, reflecting a departure from high-fidelity Montessori implementation. While localization should be considered to safeguard Montessori education’s sustainability, Chinese Montessori educators should also reflect on these findings as high implementation fidelity has been linked to better student outcomes.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1057/s41599-021-00934-3

ISSN: 2662-9992

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Breathing and Behavior: The Effects of Mindfulness Practices on Work Completion and Self- Regulation in the Upper Elementary Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Three-hour work cycle, Upper elementary, Work periods

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a mindfulness curriculum and practices on student self-regulation and work completion. The study took place in a large suburban school in western Canada with 19 participants in a grade four, five and six Montessori classroom. The intervention took place over a period of six weeks, during which the researcher led mindfulness lessons using the MindUp curriculum. Additionally, students took part in mindfulness and yoga practices daily and weekly, respectively. Data was collected using student journals, an observational tally, student work cycle folders, and student pre and post surveys. The data shows an increase in mindful and self-regulated behavior as well as improved work completion rates. It is recommended that future studies focus on a broader subject base as well as a more longitudinal period of intervention and data collection.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Comparison of the Application of Maria Montessori's Language Arts Ideas and Practices in Two Periods of Development in the United States: 1909-1921 and 1953-1963

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Americas, Language acquisition, Language development, Language education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori's work is intimately grounded in her detailed teaching practices and the logic of their sequence, along with their underlying ideas and values, particularly in the area of language arts. There are no studies, however, which comprehensively analyze her language arts curriculum for children from three to seven as it was applied by the practitioners who fostered, interpreted, and promoted her work in America in two periods of its popularity: 1909-1921 and 1953-1963. This lack of comprehensive analysis blurs the fundamental identity and contextual coherence of Montessori's work and obscures the significant and ongoing contribution made to American education through her language arts curriculum. An analysis of Montessori's published work and those written about her was made in order to achieve a description of her language arts curriculum for the purpose of comparing her work to that of her American sponsors. To determine how Montessori's curriculum was interpreted and applied, the literature on the history of the Montessori movement was reviewed and five leaders were identified: Ann George, Alexander Graham Bell, Clara Craig, Helen Parkhurst, and Nancy McCormick Rambusch. Their writings and other primary sources were analyzed with reference to Montessori's curriculum. In some cases interviews were conducted and Montessori classrooms were observed over an extended period of time. The analysis of the activity of the leaders, within their contemporary social and educational settings revealed how Montessori's curriculum became detached from her original experimental context and was reshaped because of lack of understanding or of agreement with the sys~ tematic purpose of her educational material in the development of language arts skills, and because of varying intentions and views on how and what children should learn. The findings of the study also contribute to existing studies on the reasons for the decline of Montessori's practices by the end of the first period, and for success in the revival of her work in the second period. In addition, conclusions contribute to the unified body of knowledge needed to thoroughly identify the Montessori educational model practiced and researched by educators.

Language: English

Published: Durham, North Carolina, 1984

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Early Childhood Montessori Pedagogy: Practices and Challenges in Pupils' Cognitive Development in Dar es Salaam City, Tanzania

Available from: Research and Scientific Innovation Society

Publication: International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science, vol. 7, no. 3

Pages: 228-245

Africa, Cognitive development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, East Africa, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Sub-Saharan Africa, Tanzania

See More

Abstract/Notes: The Montessori educational method has seen great success in recent years. The media portrays this method in a very favourable

Language: English

ISSN: 2454-6186

Article

Montessori Practices: Options for a Digital Age

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 41, no. 2

Pages: 153-181

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

See More

Abstract/Notes: Mark Powell's plea for an open-minded view on the full scope of technology that is compatible with Montessori education enriches Maria Montessori's clear modernism of welcoming science into her educational vision. Growing up digital can be intelligently managed so that "technology may offer an effective, adaptable, and easily available means … to gain independence … that may otherwise have intimidated them." Mark's enthusiasm for the right use of technology in history, writing, touch typing, information access and sharing, photography, place-based learning, and citizen science upholds technology as a supportive and educational tool for today's Montessori student. Mark offers a laundry list of technology resources to choose with commentary as to positive learning tendencies met by digital natives, millennials, and succeeding generations of young people who look to adapt to the onslaught of technological tools in carrying out life missions.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis

Práticas com inspiração em Maria Montessori no jardim de infância: um estudo de caso [Practices inspired by Maria Montessori in kindergarten: a case study]

Available from: Escola Superior de Educação de Paula Frassinetti

See More

Abstract/Notes: O presente relatório foi desenvolvido no âmbito da Prática de Ensino Supervisionada em Educação Pré-Escolar, integrada no Mestrado em Educação Pré- Escolar e Ensino do 1.º Ciclo do Ensino Básico. Este estudo realizou-se com um grupo de vinte e quatro crianças com 4 anos de idade e a respetiva educadora, de um jardim-de-infância do distrito do Porto. Enquadrouse numa abordagem qualitativa, através de um estudo de caso, sendo a questão de partida orientadora da investigação: De que forma o método de Maria Montessori está presente na organização do ambiente educativo, ao nível do espaço e dos materiais no jardim de infância? Decorrente desta pergunta foram definidos objetivos e mobilizadas técnicas e instrumentos de recolha de dados: a observação participante, a análise documental, as notas de campo, o portefólio reflexivo e a entrevista à educadora cooperante. Assim sendo, foi possível concluir, que na instituição onde decorreu a pesquisa, a educadora cooperante sustentava algumas das suas intervenções educativas em princípios de Maria Montessori, ainda que de forma não consciente. Recorria, designadamente, a materiais e imagens, as mais reais possíveis e utilizava alguns materiais com inspiração no método Montessori na organização do ambiente educativo. Promovia atividades para trabalhar a educação do silêncio, a educação sensorial e a autonomia das crianças. Estas intervenções valorizavam a participação da criança e atribuíam-lhe centralidade no processo de ensino aprendizagem. Na linha da investigação-ação a estagiária teve uma intervenção junto do grupo de crianças sustentada em princípios do método de Montessori que passaram pela organização do ambiente educativo, utilização de materiais diversificados Montessorianos, nas atividades e situações pedagógicas que desenvolveu. Essa ação promoveu o desenvolvimento de várias áreas e domínios de desenvolvimento da criança, nomeadamente: a educação dos sentidos; a coordenação óculo-manual; a motricidade fina e grossa; a aquisição de habilidades para a vida diária; o desenvolvimento de competências de matemática e de linguagem oral e abordagem à escrita. [This report was developed within the scope of the Practice of Supervised Teaching in Pre-School Education, integrated in the Master's Degree in Pre-School Education and Teaching of the 1st Cycle of Basic Education. This study was carried out with a group of twenty-four 4-year-old children and their teacher, from a kindergarten in the district of Porto. It was framed in a qualitative approach, through a case study, with the starting question guiding the investigation: How is Maria Montessori's method present in the organization of the educational environment, in terms of space and materials in kindergarten? As a result of this question, objectives were defined and techniques and instruments for data collection were mobilized: participant observation, document analysis, field notes, the reflective portfolio and the interview with the cooperating educator. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that in the institution where the research took place, the cooperating educator supported some of her educational interventions in Maria Montessori principles, even if not consciously. She resorted, namely, to materials and images, as real as possible and used some materials inspired by the Montessori method in the organization of the educational environment. She promoted activities to work on the education of silence, sensory education and children's autonomy. These interventions valued the child's participation and attributed centrality to the teaching-learning process. In the line of action-research, the intern had an intervention with the group of children based on the principles of the Montessori method, which went through the organization of the educational environment, use of diverse Montessori materials, in the activities and pedagogical situations that she developed. This action promoted the development of several areas and domains of child development, namely: education of the senses; eye-hand coordination; fine and gross motor skills; the acquisition of skills for daily life; the development of math and oral language skills and approach to writing. Keywords: Method of Maria Montessori; Montessori educational environment; Child conception; Kindergarten in the activities and pedagogical situations he developed. This action promoted the development of several areas and domains of child development, namely: education of the senses; eye-hand coordination; fine and gross motor skills; the acquisition of skills for daily life; the development of mathematics and oral language skills and approach to writing. Keywords: Method of Maria Montessori; Montessori educational environment; Child conception; Kindergarten in the activities and pedagogical situations he developed. This action promoted the development of several areas and domains of child development, namely: education of the senses; eye-hand coordination; fine and gross motor skills; the acquisition of skills for daily life; the development of math and oral language skills and approach to writing.]

Language: Portuguese

Published: Porto, Portugal, 2021

Article

Identifying Best Practices: What You See Is What You Get

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 16, no. 4

Pages: 20-22

See More

Abstract/Notes: NAEYC standards and Montessori

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Advanced Search