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1370 results

Article

Authenticity and Technology in Montessori Education

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 2

Pages: 16-20

Classroom environments, Elementary education, Information and communications technology (ICT), Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Prepared environment, Technology and children

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori classrooms commonly integrate their learning across the curriculum, and participate in service learning projects. Both of these practices are authentic experiences for children. This article outlines examples of technology being used to create authentic learning environments, tasks, audiences, sources, and assessments. Technology provides access to the information, tools, and personnel that were once only available through extended research and in laboratories. Through technology, students no longer have to work with old data to learn weather patterns; they now have the capability to download real time data and make predictions about the weather. In this article, the author discusses the different authentic tasks that she used in the classroom. Providing authenticity to those learning experiences, supplemented with the wealth of educational resources available through technology, can only enrich the daily lessons and further the Montessori's mission to create lifelong learners of both students and educators.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

La creatività e la capacità espressiva del bambino [The creativity and expressive capacity of the child]

Available from: Atlante Montessori

Publication: Vita dell'Infanzia (Opera Nazionale Montessori), vol. 21, no. 10-11

Pages: 3-4

Marziola Pignatari - Writings

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0042-7241

Master's Thesis (M.A.)

Montessori in the South Bronx: Considering Advantages for English Language Learners and Examining Tensions in New York City’s First and Only Montessori Public School

Available from: American Montessori Society

Americas, Language acquisition, Language development, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: New York City, New York, 2016

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Early Childhood Montessori Pedagogy: Practices and Challenges in Pupils’ Cognitive Development in Dar es Salaam City, Tanzania

Available from: Research and Scientific Innovation Society

Publication: International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science, vol. 7, no. 3

Pages: 228-245

Africa, Cognitive development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, East Africa, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Sub-Saharan Africa, Tanzania

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori educational method has seen great success in recent years. The media portrays this method in a very favourable

Language: English

ISSN: 2454-6186

Book Section

Il bambino e la città [The child and the city]

Book Title: Convegno sui problemi dell'educazione infantile nella vita industriale: atti [Conference on the problems of childhood education in industrial life: proceedings]

Pages: 100-122

Conferences

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Language: Italian

Published: Roma, Italy: Ente Opera Montessori, 1956

Article

Into the City: Near North Montessori School and the Uses of Environment

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 1

Pages: 113-127

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: Rick Mosher's coining of the word "Urbkinder" reminds us that the city provides a broad environment for learning with key experiences being defined by the student's choice of in-depth involvement. Quoting John Long, these city experiences are real, engaging, connected to thought, allow for personal reflection, and rely on the teaching moment. Rick Mosher feels that the urban experience should be clearly differentiated from that of the work on the land, but his characterization of the needs and tendencies of adolescents shows little difference from unfolding development on the farm. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Montessori: Engaging the Human Personality," Fort Worth, TX, February 29, 2012.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Book Section

Bowling Green Nursery School [New York City]

Book Title: Preschool and Parental Education: 28th Yearbook

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Language: English

Published: Bloomington, Illinois: Public School Publishing Co., 1929

Report

An Evaluation of the Relationship between Academic Performance and Physical Fitness Measures in City Montessori Schools

Available from: Social Science Research Network

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between academic achievement and physical fitness in City Montessori Schools. Data from the academic year 2004-2005 Fitnessgram were compared to reading, mathematics and science scores on the Health Standards Test (CST) of 253 elementary schools in the Orange County School District. Physical education teachers from the 10 lowest scoring and 10 highest scoring schools were interviewed regarding content of the physical education classes in their school. Simple correlation coefficients revealed a positive linear relationship between academic scores and physical fitness scores. The interview with the teachers revealed that most of the 10 lowest scoring schools did not have a designated physical education teacher. All of the 10 highest scoring schools had designated physical education teachers and followed the physical education guidelines recommended by the Lucknow Education Board.

Language: English

Published: Rochester, New York, Mar 27, 2013

Report

Preschool Education for Inner-City Children: Preliminary Results of an Experimental Montessori Programme

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Early results from a Montessori nursery program initiated by Toronto, Canada, in 1971, to help inner-city children prepare for formal education indicate that the mothers of the 15 three- and four-year-old children were pleased with the program. Specifically, they felt that the children had increased their verbal skills, preparedness for junior kindergarten, and social maturity. However, not all mothers were pleased with the increased independence shown by some of the children. A study of the children's characteristics suggested that caution should be exerted in extrapolating the findings from other so-called disadvantaged children to inner-city children in one's own city. Other data are useful but the needs of a particular population must be carefully observed. When isolating deficiencies or identity needs, wholesale generalizations from superficial measures should not be made. Precise and explicit definitions should be made for such terms as deficient in language, intellectual motivation, or conceptual ability. Otherwise inadequate solutions are likely to result. (JS)

Language: English

Published: Toronto, Canada, Nov 1971

Report

Implementing a Multi-age Model in a New York City Public School.

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Benefits of multi-age grouping include continuity for children and teachers, a sense of community, the possibility for peer tutoring, and an incorporation of developmental differences. This study explored the development of a non-graded program in a New York City public school, particularly the attitudes of teachers, students, and parents to the new program. Twenty subjects in each category completed a survey or an interview. Results indicated that not only were parents and students relatively uninformed about mixed-age grouping before the program began, but teachers also felt that the support and training they received were inadequate. Teachers did have positive attitudes about the benefits of mixed-age grouping, however, and students seemed to have made a positive adjustment. About half of the parents held positive attitudes toward mixed-age grouping, but parents overall appeared to reserve judgment because of a perceived lack of information.

Language: English

Published: [S.I.], 1996

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